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The Africa Union Joins the Global Fight to End Neglected Tropical Diseases by 2020
May 4, 2013 | 0 Comments

Africa Union Health Ministers Call for Increased Investments to Rid Africa of Neglected Tropical Diseases

 

Dr. Neeraj MistryManaging Director of the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases,

Dr. Neeraj MistryManaging Director of the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases,

ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA, April 29, 2013— The Sixth Conference of African Union Ministers of Health (CAMH6) concluded on April 26, 2013 with a strong call for African countries and development partners to increase support for neglected tropical disease (NTD) control and elimination programs. This call for action supports the World Health Organization’s (WHO) goal to control or eliminate ten of the most common NTDs by 2020.

 NTDs were prominently featured at this year’s CAMH6 which took place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from April 22-26, 2013. The African Ministers of Health acknowledged the tremendous work done by country governments, the WHO Regional Office for Africa, and development partners, highlighting the development of 36 multi-year, national NTD control and elimination plans, the WHO Roadmap for Implementation titled, Accelerating Work to Overcome the Global Impact of Neglected Tropical Diseases, and the January 2012 London Declaration on NTDs. The Ministers called on African governments and partners to build on this momentum by making financial commitments towards the implementation of the national NTD control and elimination plans.

NTDs are a group of parasitic and bacterial diseases that infect more than one billion people around the world, most of whom live below the poverty line. These diseases cause malnutrition and anemia, pregnancy complications, blindness, disfigurement and delays to physical and cognitive growth among children, often perpetuating the poverty of those they infect.

During the conference, the Africa Union Commission (AUC) and the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases, an initiative of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, co-hosted a high-level breakfast discussion to showcase the current challenges and available solutions to combat NTDs in Africa. The meeting outlined clear actions for African governments and development partners to ensure NTD control and elimination by 2020.

This breakfast discussion, which included remarks by His Excellency Dr. Mustapha Kaloko, AUC Commissioner for Social Affairs; Ambassador Michael Marine, chief executive officer of the Sabin Vaccine Institute; the Honorable Dr. Sabine Ntakarutimana, Minister of Health for the Republic of Burundi; and Dr. Luis Gomes Sambo, regional director of the WHO Regional Office for Africa.

“Africa has the highest burden of NTDs in the world, with just under 50 percent of the global NTD burden. NTDs pose a threat to healthcare, economic development and the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals,” said His Excellency Dr. Mustapha Sidiki Kaloko, Commissioner of Social Affairs at the African Union. “CAMH6 is reigniting this issue with the hope of triggering strong action against these diseases.”

“This week’s focus on NTDs confirmed African leaders’ commitment to advancing the region’s health and development,” said Ambassador Michael W. Marine, chief executive officer of the Sabin Vaccine Institute. “This strong commitment will be a clear signal of increased ownership of this issue by African governments and will catalyze greater financial contributions from development partners.”

Burundi became the first francophone country in the region to officially launch an integrated national plan to combat NTDs in February 2012. Dr. Sabine Ntakarutimana, the Honorable Minister of Health for the Republic of Burundi, encouraged other African nations to adopt a similar commitment to eliminate NTDs by 2020.

Dr. Luis Gomes Sambo, regional director of the WHO Regional Office for Africa, highlighted the new and growing momentum to eliminate NTDs. Dr. Sambo added that, “government leadership and commitment remains critical to accelerating the control and elimination of NTDs and enhancing development in Africa.”

 To learn more about NTDs in Africa, visit www.globalnetwork.org

Media Contacts:

Amber Cashwell

Policy Officer, Sabin Vaccine Institute

Tel: +1 202-621-1695 or Mobile: +1 (864) 978-9335

amber.cashwell@sabin.org

 Wynne Musabayana

Deputy Head of Information and Communication

African Union Commission

Email: MusabayanaW@africa-union.org

 About NTDs

NTDs are a group of 17 parasitic and bacterial infections that are the most common afflictions of the world’s poorest people. They blind, disable and disfigure their victims, trapping them in a cycle of poverty and disease. Research shows that treating NTDs lifts millions out of poverty by ensuring that children stay in school to learn and prosper; by strengthening worker productivity; and by improving maternal and child health.

 

About Sabin Vaccine Institute 

Sabin Vaccine Institute is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization of scientists, researchers, and advocates dedicated to reducing needless human suffering caused by vaccine preventable and neglected tropical diseases. Sabin works with governments, leading public and private organizations, and academic institutions to provide solutions for some of the world’s most pervasive health challenges. Since its founding in 1993 in honor of the oral polio vaccine developer, Dr. Albert B. Sabin, the Institute has been at the forefront of efforts to control, treat, and eliminate these diseases by developing new vaccines, advocating use of existing vaccines, and promoting increased access to affordable medical treatments. For more information please visit www.sabin.org.

 

About the African Union

The African Union Commission is the Secretariat of the African Union whose vision is that of “An integrated, prosperous and peaceful Africa, driven by its own citizens and representing a dynamic force in global arena.” The mission of the Commission is to become “An efficient and value-adding institution driving the African integration and development process in close collaboration with African Union Member States, the Regional Economic Communities and African citizens.” Guided by its values and principles, the Commission will endeavour to achieve its mission through implementation of clear goals and strategies and by committing the requisite resources for effective discharge of its mandate. This would require the AUC presenting specific proposals to give full effect to its texts, and bring new possibilities and benefits to the citizens of Africa.

 

 

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Equatorial Guinea Moves Towards Partnership with GB Group Global To Improve Health Standards
April 10, 2013 | 0 Comments

Equatorial Guinea  (EG) Ministry of Health meets in Washington,DC with GB Group Global andTNI Biotech (OTCBB:TNIB) to launch major innovative health solutions and improve pharmaceutical quality for its citizens.

 

 

 GB Energy Washington, D.C. The EG Ministry of Health met with Dr. Gloria B. Herndon of GB Group Global in the nation’s capital recently as part of Equitorial Guinea’s efforts to dramatically raise its standards of health care. These endeavors include building a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility in EG, implementing pharmaceutical quality control and policies,  and exploring the release of a new treatment (Low Dose Naltrexone LDN) against cancer and HIV/AIDS.

 The purpose of the visit of Dr. Diosdado-Vicente Milang Nsue, the Delegate Minister of Health & Social Services and Dr. Consuelo Ondo Efua the D i r e c t o r  G e n e r a l  o f Drug Supply and Medical Equipment, was to engage with organizations who through assistance, partnership and the sharing of best practices could close knowledge gaps and help bring improved health care to Equatorial Guineans. The visitors’ meetings with members of the medical community were facilitated by Dr. Herndon, President and Managing Member of GB Group Global andits wide ranging auxiliary companies, GB Energie, GB Pharma and GB Oncology and Imaging Group.

 Presiding over their near week-long stay, Dr. Herndon said the government of EG had included the improvement of health care as a facet of the “Industrialization Plan-2020”, which was defined by the government and stretches across all sectors of the country to focus on raising the economic level and quality of life of the country’s citizens by year 2020.

Among issues discussed, Minister Dr. Milang Nsue raised a problem rampant overseas: The need for affordable high quality medicines. “The devastating effects of substandard and counterfeit medicines in circulation lead to treatment failure, increased mortality; and the development of drug resistance.” Dr. Milang Nsue also stressed that “…establishing in Equatorial Africa a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility with an analytical laboratory would be of paramount importance.” The proposed facility was part of conversations with TNI Bio Tech Inc., GB Pharma, Gb Oncology & Imaging Group,  Howard University and the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) representatives, with whom partnerships were discussed.

The Director of Pharmacology, Dr. Ondo Efua said “With the availability of a drug manufacturing facility to treat the most current pathologies, we could secure the safety and high quality of medicines either produced in EG or imported. We would have taken an important step to halt the traffic and commercialization of the counterfeit medicines that undermine the quality of the health services delivered to our population” Further, as EG is concerned with the global struggle to combat the scourge of diseases such as HIV/AIDS and cancer, new developments regarding the therapy known asIRT-103 Low Dose Naltrexone* (LDN) were explained during the sessions with TNI Bio Tech Inc. (OTCBB:TNIB) IRT-103 is an active immunotherapy for patients with deficient functioning of the immune system. It works within the body by activating the patient’s immune system to attack and destroy cancer cells and controlling infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS. The therapy  has been hailed in other countries where it will be used as inexpensive and simple to manage, requiring only one dose each day, taken orally.

The process to initiate approval of the treatment of HIV/AIDS and cancer by IRT-103 should begin soon. This step will change the lives of the country’s citizens, by decreasing the sufferings and death of the killer diseases, and will permit Equatorial Guinea to take a leadership position in eliminating these plagues. A meeting will be held in Malabo, the capital of Equatorial Guinea, with the technical team of TNIB, GB Pharma and GB Oncology & Imaging Group in order to present the significance of IRT-103 to the medical and scientific community of EG and acquainting them with IRT-103’s most recent advances and widened scope. Concluding the sessions, Dr. Herndon said she felt the exchanges had been productive, and was pleased that “…we (GB Group Global) were able to demonstrate our commitment to viable and sustainable solutions to the issues of the citizens well being and the growth of the nation.”

 GB Group Global’s entrepreneurial founder, Dr. Gloria B. Herndon, has more than 35 years of successfully conducting business internationally. Her social give-back programs in education, healthcare and municipal development are just a few areas the GB Group champions together with its collateral partners. The GB Group currently focuses on innovative and sustainable solutions in the energy, environment and health sectors. 

                GB Group Global

                        providing innovative & sustainable solutions while doing good

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:

Jan Du Plain

jan@duplain.com

202-486-7004

 

 

 

 

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Wave of Celebrity Support Boosts Global Effort to Eliminate Seven Diseases by 2020
August 20, 2012 | 0 Comments

By Sabin Admin on Wed, 08/01/2012 – 10:32

END7 campaign fights treatable Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) that infect more than 1 billion people

 Washington, DC—August 1, 2012—Celebrities from around the world called on their fans and followers to join the END7 campaign, a global effort to eliminate seven neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) by 2020. Music, entertainment and fashion stars, including Katy Perry,  Slash, Ewan McGregor, Stella McCartney, Tom Felton, Alyssa Milano, Danny DeVito, Amos Lee, Norah Jones, MC Hammer, Aaron Neville, The Kooks, Rosanne Cash and many others reached out to their Twitter and Facebook fans to help END7 raise awareness about these devastating diseases of poverty that infect one in six people worldwide, including 500 million children.

 “Join us in ending 7 diseases by 2020! Follow @END_7 today and find out how to make it all possible!” tweeted pop singer Katy Perry (@katyperry) to her 24 million followers.

“My fans mean the world to me. Today you meant the world to millions of kids suffering with NTDs,” tweeted British actor and a star of the “Harry Potter” movie franchise, Tom Felton (@tomfelton).

“Thousands of you have joined me to help #End7 preventable diseases today. You inspire me!” Felton also posted.

Yesterday’s social media push reached more than 50 million people through Twitter and Facebook, and put the END7 campaign on the map for millions who had never heard about NTDs.

“This week marks a turning point for the END7 campaign, as millions of people are learning just how easy it can be to eliminate or control a group of diseases that plague the world’s poorest people,” said Dr. Neeraj Mistry, managing director of the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases. “We are incredibly grateful for all of the new support we have seen over the past week and hope that it continues to inspire others to join our cause.”

It costs just 50 cents to treat and protect one person for an entire year against all seven of the most common NTDs. Pills to treat these diseases are donated by pharmaceutical companies and many programs use existing infrastructure, such as schools and community centers, to administer the treatments, making NTD treatment one of most cost-effective public health initiatives available today.

“See how you can help stop 7 different kinds of diseases with a donation as small as 50 cents,” posted Stella McCartney (@stellamccartney), fashion designer and daughter of Beatles member, Sir Paul McCartney.

NTDs cause blindness, massive swelling in appendages and limbs, severe malnutrition and anemia.  These diseases prevent children from growing and learning. They reduce adults’ economic productivity and ability to care for their families, keeping communities trapped in a cycle of poverty and disease.

The END7 campaign, launched earlier this year by the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases, an initiative of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, aims to raise the public awareness and funding required to cover the cost of distributing medicine and setting up treatment programs for NTDs. It is the first global public awareness campaign dedicated to NTD treatment and elimination and relies heavily on compelling visual content disseminated through various social media channels such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to spread its message.

 

To see a full list of our celebrity supporters and to learn more about NTDs or to join the END7 campaign, please visit END7 on Facebook. Together we can see the end!

About END7

END7 is a grassroots campaign that seeks to raise money to expand access to NTD treatments and catalyze support for NTD control efforts to encourage major political and philanthropic leaders to increase funding for this important global health issue. The U.K. and U.S. governments, as well as major pharmaceutical companies, have already made significant contributions. END7 works with the World Health Organization and many other global partners.

About NTDs

NTDs are a group of 17 parasitic and bacterial infections that are the most common afflictions of the world’s poorest people. The Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases focuses on the seven most common NTDs that account for 90 percent of the disease burden – elephantiasis, river blindness, snail fever, trachoma, hookworm, whipworm and roundworm. They blind, disable and disfigure their victims, trapping them in a cycle of poverty and disease. Research shows that treating NTDs lifts millions out of poverty by ensuring that children stay in school to learn and prosper, by strengthening worker productivity and by improving maternal and child health.

About Sabin Vaccine Institute 

Sabin Vaccine Institute is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization of scientists, researchers and advocates dedicated to reducing needless human suffering caused by vaccine-preventable and neglected tropical diseases. Sabin works with governments, leading public and private organizations and academic institutions to provide solutions for some of the world’s most pervasive health challenges. Since its founding in 1993 in honor of the oral polio vaccine developer, Dr. Albert B. Sabin, the Institute has been at the forefront of efforts to control, treat and eliminate these diseases by developing new vaccines, advocating the use of existing vaccines and promoting increased access to affordable medical treatments. For more information please visit www.sabin.org

 

 

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Despite Strong Economic Growth, Neglected Tropical Diseases Remain a Barrier for Human Development in Nigeria
August 20, 2012 | 0 Comments

By Sabin Admin

WASHINGTON, D.C.Today, the open-access journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases published a comprehensive report showcasing the high burden of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in Nigeria. The paper’s authors, Drs. Peter Hotez, Oluwatoyin Asojo and Adekunle Adesina, found that despite Nigeria’s recent economic growth, progress in human development areas such as public health have lagged, contributing to high rates of NTDs in the country.

Among all African nations, Nigeria has the highest number of people infected with high-prevalence NTDs, such as soil transmitted helminth (STH) infections, schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis (river blindness) and lymphatic filariasis (LF). In fact, Nigeria not only has the highest prevalence of both schistosomiasis and river blindness in Africa, but also the highest global rates of these debilitating NTDs. The resulting enormous disease burden adversely affects maternal and child health and worker productivity in Nigeria, a pattern repeated throughout Africa.

“NTDs often perpetuate the cycle of poverty,” said Dr. Hotez, president of Sabin Vaccine Institute and director of the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development. “Because they can cause severe illness and long-term disability, they prohibit children from attending school and adults from working or even caring for their children.” Dr. Hotez is also the founding dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine.

However, Nigeria is in a unique position to quickly improve the devastation caused by NTDs. It has the third largest economy in Africa, with a gross domestic product (GDP) that is similar to western European countries such as Belgium and Sweden. As a result, Nigeria is better equipped than other neighboring countries to provide affordable access to NTD treatment and control programs.

NTDs are some of the most cost-effective public health programs available today. In Nigeria, the approximate cost to treat the population for the most common NTDs is 0.1 percent of the GDP.

Some strides have already been made to help eliminate NTDs in Nigeria. For example, Nigeria has been successful in its efforts with the Carter Center and the World Health Organization (WHO)to eradicate guinea worm. Through investments with the Nigerian government that exceeded US $2 million, along with other public and private support, the disease’s transmission has been halted there since 2009. Additionally, the Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health has successfully collaborated with the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) to ensure that 96 percent of the 35,000 at-risk communities have received and/or continue to receive treatment to prevent river blindness. In addition to calling for an expansion of ongoing NTD control and elimination efforts, the authors call for continued collaboration between the Nigerian government and public health organizations such as UNICEF, WHO Regional Office for Africa (AFRO) and the Carter Center to continue this important work to reduce the burden of NTDs.

“Nigeria can build on past success by aggressively expanding its national disease prevention programs to include integrated mass-drug administration (MDA) programs to treat several NTDs at once, helping to stop the disease transmission cycle and ultimately see the end of these diseases,” said Dr. Adesina, also at Texas Children’s Hospital and the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine.

The authors also called for new treatment and prevention tools, such as simpler and less expensive diagnostic reagents and more research and development for NTD vaccines, which is currently underway at the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development.

“Nigeria’s research institutes and universities have an enormous potential to contribute to the development of a new generation of drugs, diagnostics and vaccines for these conditions,” said Dr. Asojo, a scientist and faculty member at the National School of Tropical Medicine.

“A Nigeria free of NTDs will accelerate the country’s economic development through improvements in worker productivity, pregnancy outcomes and childhood education,” concluded Dr. Hotez.  “By expanding integrated NTD control, Nigeria could quickly become a role model for all of Africa.”

The full paper, “Nigeria: ‘Ground Zero’ for High Prevalence Neglected Tropical Diseases,” can be found at www.plosntds.org.

About NTDs
NTDs are a group of 17 parasitic and bacterial infections that are the most common afflictions of the world’s poorest people. They blind, disable and disfigure their victims, trapping them in a cycle of poverty and disease. Research shows that treating NTDs lifts millions out of poverty by ensuring that children stay in school to learn and prosper; by strengthening worker productivity; and by improving maternal and child health.

 About Sabin Vaccine Institute 

Sabin Vaccine Institute is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization of scientists, researchers, and advocates dedicated to reducing needless human suffering caused by vaccine preventable and neglected tropical diseases. Sabin works with governments, leading public and private organizations, and academic institutions to provide solutions for some of the world’s most pervasive health challenges. Since its founding in 1993 in honor of the oral polio vaccine developer, Dr. Albert B. Sabin, the Institute has been at the forefront of efforts to control, treat, and eliminate these diseases by developing new vaccines, advocating use of existing vaccines, and promoting increased access to affordable medical treatments. For more information please visit www.sabin.org.

About Baylor College of Medicine

 

 

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