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Over 150 High-Level Speakers to Grace the Africa Trade & Investment Global Summit (ATIGS) 2018 in Washington, D.C
March 1, 2018 | 0 Comments
Over 150 High-Level Speakers to Grace the Africa Trade & Investment Global Summit (ATIGS) 2018 in Washington, D.C
“Driving Trade, Unleashing Investment and Enhancing Economic Development: the Gateway to African Markets”
WASHINGTON D.C., United States of America, February 28, 2018/ — Business leaders and prominent personalities are expected to speak at the Africa Trade & Investment Global Summit (ATIGS) 2018 (http://ATIGS2018.com) to be held on June 24 to June 26 at World Trade Center – Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C. The prestigious biennial business conference and exhibition will bring together delegates from more than 70 countries including government delegations, high-profile African leaders, project developers, and international investors. The event has a well-structured format for facilitating direct peer engagement, for more advanced deal-making, showcasing fundable companies, co-investments and financing engagements, strategic partnerships, and business networking.

The 2018 Summit will feature as panelist and speakers a wide array of senior officials and distinguished personalities including, Hon Senator Ike Ekwerenmadu, Deputy Senate President of Nigeria; H.E. Adonia Ayebare, Uganda’s Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the United Nations;H.E.Clyde Rivers Ph.D. Ambassador of Republic of Burundi, and Advisor to the President of Burundi; Hon Dr. Ekwow Spio-Garbrah, former Minister for Trade & Industry, and former Ambassador of Ghana to the USA; Hon. Ibrahim Awaal Mohammed, Minister for Business Development in Ghana; Hon. Sebastian Kopulande, CEO, Zambian International Trade and Investment Centre (ZITIC) in Zambia; Andrew Herscowit, Coordinator, Power Africa – U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in USA; Asma ALAOU, CEO, Africa Key Partners in Morocco; Arnon Rosenbaum, VP Global Projects, Netafim in Israel; Belarmino Van-Dúnem, Chairman of Angola’s Investment and Exports Promotion Agency (APIEX); Maria Goravanchi,Director, Overseas Private Investment Corporation in USA; Dr. Mohamed Doumbouya, Minister of Budget, Republic of GuineaRaj Kumar, Founding President of Devex in United States, Dr. Belachew Mekuria, Industrial Park Division Deputy Commissioner of Ethiopian Investment CommissionDr. Mima S. Nedelcovych, President & CEO of Initiative for Global Development in USA; Pablo Martín Carbajal, Deputy head for African Affairs, and CEO of Proexca, Government of the Canary Islands; Bernadette Fernandes, Founder of The Varanda Network in Canada; Chris Kirubi, Director, Centum Investment in Kenya; Chris Knight, Global Commercial Director for fDi Intelligence, Financial Times Group in UK; Dr. Richmond Annan, President, iRichie Group Inc in USA; Dr. Munir Ahmad Ch, President, Aspire World Investments LLC – United Arab EmiratesDr. Mima S. Nedelcovych, President & CEO of Initiative for Global Development in USA; Joseph Lititiyo, Deputy Executive Secretary of Economic Community of the Great Lakes Countries in Rwanda; Matthew Downing, Chairman & CEO, Ethium Group in Australia; Prince Adetokunbo Kayode, President of Abuja Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Nigeria; Vanessa Adams, Director of Strategic Partnerships of DAI in France; Walid Loukil, Deputy Managing Director of Loukil Group in Tunisia; Xoliswa Daku, Founder & CEO, Daku Group of Companies in South Africa; Zekarias Amsalu, Founder and MD of IBEX Frontier, IBEX Financial Consultancy Ltd in Ethiopia, and many more.

For all speaker’s line-up and for all latest developments. visit www.ATIGS2018.com

ATIGS 2018 will feature unique activities, top rated speakers, and high-level participation. To register for the event, visit www.ATIGS2018.com/eventbrite, and for exhibition, contact ATIGS@gaadvancement.com

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WHY U.S. COMPANIES NEED TO INCLUDE AFRICA IN THEIR GLOBAL GROWTH STRATEGIES
February 28, 2018 | 0 Comments

Grant T. Harris, CEO of Harris Africa Partners LLC, makes a compelling case on why U.S. companies need to map out how Africa’s dynamic markets fit into their company’s business plan

By Grant T. Harris*

When it comes to talk of Africa’s economic outlook, do not believe the gloom – or the hype. The “Africa rising” storyline took a big hit when commodity prices crashed, but the truth is, no monolithic narrative could ever accurately capture the continent’s dynamism, challenges, and sheer economic potential.

Nonetheless, there are some clear regional trends that should compel American businesses to ask themselves, “How does Africa factor into my company’s growth strategy?”

Frankly, there is no need for a simplistic soundbite about Africa’s economic potential. The region is a complex and diverse ensemble of markets, opportunities, and political and investment climates which, for many different reasons, are undergoing what the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has described as “multispeed” growth. For instance, while the commodity-dependent countries are currently less buoyant, four economies in East Africa – Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Uganda – are predicted to see growth above six percent through 2020.

Nevertheless, even as we eschew sweeping generalizations that pretend to lump 54 African countries into one market, there are some region-wide trends that should make businesses sit up and take notice. To get straight to the point: Africa’s long-term economic outlook remains strong, underpinned by a young and growing population that is increasingly urban and technologically savvy. Consumer spending is projected to reach $2.1 trillion by 2025, while African economies as a whole are estimated to be valued at $3 trillion by 2030 – by which time half of the population will live in urban areas. Moreover, demographic shifts mean that Africa’s place in the global economy is only likely to grow. By 2034, Africa will have more working-age people than either India or China. With a current median age of just 19.5 years, Africa will make up a quarter of the world’s population by 2050, bringing inevitable social, cultural, and economic impacts.

Of course, there is no denying that African governments have a lot of work to do to improve investment climates at national and regional levels. According to a recent African Development Bank report, “the continent’s infrastructure needs amount to $130-170 billion a year, with a financing gap in the range of $68-108 billion.” In sub-Saharan Africa, roughly two-thirds of people lack access to electricity. And it is not just insufficient infrastructure; the recent commodities crash highlighted several other persistent challenges, particularly the need for resource-rich countries to diversify their economies. Many African governments would be wise to follow the IMF’s advice to enact “policies to enhance macroeconomic stability, improve education outcomes, bolster governance and transparency in regulation, and deepen financial markets.” Importantly, many countries are working hard to realize these changes. According to the World Bank, governments in sub-Saharan Africa carried out a record number of business reforms in 2016 and 2017 – more than any other region.

Above all, it’s time to realize that misconceptions about Africa’s economic potential – that it is too risky, too poor, or simply irrelevant to most businesses – amount to lost opportunities. As when considering any emerging market, investors must to do their homework, not fall victim to oversimplified narratives, and determine how to navigate political and policy risk. Armed with the right information and foresight, investors should map out how Africa’s dynamic markets fit into their company’s business plan. As the region’s demographic and economic trends make clear, Africa can no longer be considered an “optional” component of global growth strategies.

*courtesy of IGD.Grant T. Harris is CEO of Harris Africa Partners LLC and was President Obama’s principal advisor on sub-Saharan Africa in the White House from 2011-2015. Harris Africa Partners LLC is an organizational partner for IGD’s U.S. Roadshow Tour.

 

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In Africa, citizen diplomacy fills in where Trump leaves holes
February 27, 2018 | 0 Comments

BY K. RIVA LEVINSON*

More than 13 months into the Trump administration, the senior State Department job on Africa remains unfiled, along with appointments for U.S. ambassadors to South Africa, Morocco, Tanzania, and other high-profile political posts.

In addition to these diplomatic vacancies, the Trump administration is proposing a 30 percent cut in foreign assistance for the 2019 Fiscal Year budget, on top of recent reductions, which will disproportionately impact the African continent.

These Washington realities, when considered in conjunction with the controversy over the U.S. president’s alleged remarks labeling an entire continent of 54 unique nations as “s—holes,” would appear to paint a pretty bleak picture for America’s future engagements in Africa.

However, traditional diplomacy is being increasingly supplemented by an explosion of citizen-to-citizen contacts, which are creating shared value, good-will and relationships of consequence. This work is more important now than it ever has been, and can be found in unexpected places.

NBA Africa, led by Managing Director Amadou Gallo Fall and the league’s commissionerAdam Silver, have helped to transform the NBA’s footprint in Africa. In doing so, they have become part of the front-line of private sector institutions which celebrate a continent unhampered by inaccurate clichés, and defined by its potential, its people, and its diversity.

Fall, originally from Senegal, came to the U.S. on a basketball scholarship in the late 1980s, graduated with honors, and returned to Senegal to work for the Senegal Basketball Federation. He would later be hired as a scout for the Dallas Mavericks and eventually recruited by the NBA.

Sports through Education and Economic Development in Senegal (SEEDS), which Fall founded upon his return from studying in the U.S., has become embedded into the culture of NBA Africa, and holds that through a love of sport, basketball can be a tool for social, economic and personal development.  The league has taken its commitment to community to heart through the NBA Players Association, and programs like NBA Cares, and Basketball Without Borders.

Fall and Silver lobbied to bring an NBA exhibition game to Johannesburg, South Africa, in 2015. Importantly, it would be the first game involving any major North American professional sports league to take place on the continent of Africa.

Team Africa against the World,” as it has become known, is now played annually and this year will be dedicated to the life and legacy of the former South African president, Nelson Mandela, on the centennial of his birth year.

At the NBA Africa luncheon on Saturday, 17 February, on the margins of 2018 NBA All-Star Weekend in Los Angeles,  Silver explained that, “basketball is witnessing an explosive growth in Africa.” He explained that one of the cardinal objectives of NBA Africa is to grow the game and to see more young players competing at the highest level. Silver predicts more than 100 million Africans will eventually play the game.

“But it’s not just about the sport,” Fall told me in an interview.  “Yes, we celebrate the fact that this year 12 African-born players will be playing for the NBA. But as NBA Africa, we must reach beyond the players.”

Fall believes it is his responsibility to give a greater voice to African innovation, African excellence, and to help reclaim the narrative on Africa.  And last weekend in Los Angeles, just hours before NBA All-Star Saturday Night, that’s exactly what NBA Africa did.

Silver, Fall, African legends and players like Dikembe Motumba and Serge Ibaka assembled — not to talk the sport, but to lead a discussion on youth, development and entrepreneurship.

The luncheon was titled #AfricaNow and featured a panel of African entrepreneurs to showcase the human potential of the continent through the eyes of prominent innovators and changemakers.

Said panelist Richelieu Dennis, founder of Shea Moisture:

“It is our culture and our story. We must own it. We must define it. And it is we who must monetize it.”

On stage, and at the head table sat officers from the World Bank along with private sector players, like Invest Africa.  The African Development Bank noted it would unveil later this month a multi-year program with sport as the foundation for a youth empowerment program.

Perhaps eventually the Trump administration will prioritize diplomatic engagement with Africa, appointing senior officials and propose a budget which better reflects our national security interests. In the meantime, I find inspiration in our citizen diplomats, no matter their excessive height

*Source The Hill.K. Riva Levinson is president and CEO of KRL International LLC,a D.C.-based consultancy that works in the world’s emerging markets, award-winning author of “Choosing the Hero: My Improbable Journey and the Rise of Africa’s First Woman President” (Kiwai Media, June 2016). You can follow her on Twitter @rivalevinson.

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COMIC CON COMES TO AFRICA
February 27, 2018 | 0 Comments

The first Comic Con Africa will be hosted in South Africa on

14 -16 September 2018 at the Kyalami Grand Prix Circuits & International Convention Centre

 

Reed Exhibitions Africa and, ReedPOP have partnered with VS Gaming on a South African first and will be bringing Comic Con to South Africa. ReedPOP, a subsidiary of Reed Exhibitions, and the world’s largest producer of pop culture events and VS Gaming, South Africa’s largest independent gaming brand will host Comic Con from 14 – 16 September 2018.

Comic Con Africa will take place at the Kyalami Grand Prix Circuit and International Convention Centre. Comic Con Africa will showcase comic books and science fiction/fantasy related film, series and similar popular arts.  The exhibition will also feature a large range of pop culture and entertainment elements in animation, toys, gadgets, clothing, anime, manga, collectible card games, video games, webcomics, and fantasy novels and an Artists’ Alley, where comic artists can sign autographs and sell or do free sketches.

Superhero or sidekick – there will be exciting activations to enjoy that include professional gaming tournaments and activations, cosplay competitions, and new movie and series promotions. Comic Con Africa visitors can also enjoy international and local celebrity panel discussions, seminars, workshops and autograph sessions.

“ReedPOP has always stayed true to its core beliefs of always putting the fans first, creating killer events and being as transparent and authentic as possible. We try our hardest to bring massive amounts of fun and excitement to the lives of our audience by creating content and experiences that are original, exciting, memorable and exceptionally awesome. So, we are very excited for this new launch into Africa.”

“We are also very excited to be partnering with VS Gaming to bring this world-renowned convention to South Africa. Comic Con Africa is a fantastic opportunity to promote this growing industry on the continent,” says Carol Weaving, MD of Reed Exhibitions Africa.

On the strategic alignment with Comic Con Africa, Lenushka Parannath, spokesperson of VS Gaming shared, “VS Gaming has been at the forefront of a couple of firsts, last year we successfully hosted the largest e-football Festival in Africa and now we’re the first to jointly bring Comic Con to Africa.”

Parannath continues, “We always aspire to bring gaming to life in a way that has never been experienced before and what better way to do that in 2018 than to align with Comic Con Africa. We are looking forward to hosting this incredible global brand for a 3-day out-of-this-world experience.”

ReedPOP has many global entertainment brands in its stable, including Comic Con New York, Star Wars Celebration (Lucas film), TwitchCon (Twitch) and PAX (Penny Arcade), and in collaboration with Reed Exhibitions Africa, will set the stage for Comic Con Africa – a first of its kind – to join the international league of epic comic book and industry enthusiast conventions.

About Reed Exhibitions Africa

Reed Exhibitions is Southern Africa’s top exhibition organiser and venue management company.  With access to global trade and consumer event organising expertise serving 44 industry sectors, we provide the best platform to showcase all industry sectors.

About ReedPOP

ReedPOP started up back in 2006, and we’ve been on an epic ride ever since! From the very first New York Comic Con to launching and acquiring the coolest events all over the world, we’ve always stayed true to our core beliefs of always putting our fans first, creating killer events and being as transparent and authentic as possible. We try our hardest to bring massive amounts of fun and excitement to the lives of our audience by creating content and experiences that are original, exciting, memorable and exceptionally awesome. We owe a huge thanks to our fans for fuelling this amazing journey that we are on, and we hope that you’ll continue to party with us in the future.

About VS Gaming

Formerly DGL, VS Gaming is South Africa’s largest independent gaming brand and the leading platform for online gaming in Africa. Since 2008, we’ve been devoted to providing regular tournaments and ladders across all major game titles and skill levels, because we’re just as passionate about virtual sports as you are.

As one of the fastest growing digital networks in Africa, we’re here to take local gaming to the next level by providing improved spectator access, increased awareness, education and a fun, social and rewarding environment for both pros and casual gaming enthusiasts.

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Africa: Shortlist Announced for €20.000 Henrike Grohs Art Award
February 27, 2018 | 0 Comments

The winner will be announced on 6 March and awarded on 13 March in Abidjan

Em’kal Eyongakpa (Cameroon)

Em’kal Eyongakpa (Cameroon)

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, February 26, 2018/ — Em’kal Eyongakpa (Cameroon), Georgina Maxim (Zimbabwe) and Makouvia Kokou Ferdinand (Togo) have been shortlisted for the first Henrike Grohs Art Award, conceived by the Goethe-Institut (https://goo.gl/nKYUpW) and the Grohs family. The winner will be announced on 6 March and awarded on 13 March in Abidjan.

Em’kal Eyongakpa is an intermedia artist who approaches the experienced, the unknown, as well as collective histories through a ritual use of repetition and transformation. His recent ideas draw from indigenous knowledge systems and aesthetics, ethnobotany, applied mycology as well as technology.

Georgina Maxim’s work combines weaving, stitch work and the utilisation of found textiles creating objects that evade definition. The dresses are deconstructed, and at times reconstructed to find new ways of giving tribute to and reflection upon the person that owned the original garment.

In Makouvia Kokou Ferdinand’s sculptural and performance work, he plays with borders and mixes memories, materials and cultural references. Building on traditional Mina culture, his gaze on contemporary society is unique, sometimes ironic and often moving.

The Henrike Grohs Art Award is a biennial prize dedicated to artists who are living and working in Africa and practicing in the field of visual arts. It recognises the lifetime achievements of the former Head of the Goethe-Institut in Abidjan, Henrike Grohs, who was killed on 13 March 2016 in a terrorist attack in Grand-Bassam, Côte d’Ivoire.

The prize “aims at strengthening artists and encouraging them in their quest for a world of togetherness and dialogue”, said jury members Koyo Kouoh (Artistic Director, RAW Material Company, Dakar), Laurence Bonvin (artist and representative of the Grohs family, Berlin), Raphael Chikukwa (Chief Curator, National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare) and Simon Njami (Curator, Paris).

More about the shortlisted artists

Em’kal Eyongakpa
Video portrait:

 https://youtu.be/xkagubNL6ZA 

Em’kal Eyongakpa (born 1981 in Mamfe, Cameroon) is an intermedia artist who approaches the experienced, the unknown, as well as collective histories through a ritual use of repetition and transformation. His recent ideas increasingly draw from indigenous knowledge systems and aesthetics, ethnobotany, applied mycology as well as technology in his explorations of the personal and the universal. Eyongakpa is also known for self-organised community research projects and autonomous art hubs like KHaL!SHRINE in Yaoundé (2007-2012) and the recently launched sound art and music platform ɛfúkúyú. He holds degrees in Plant biology and Ecology from the University of Yaoundé and was a resident at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam.

Eyongakpa’s work has recently been exhibited at the Jakarta Biennale (2017), the 13th Sharjah Biennial (2017), La Biennale de Montreal (2016), the 32nd Bienal de São Paulo (2016), the 9th and 10th Bamako Encounters (2011, 2015), the 10th Biennale de l’art africain contemporain, Dak’art (2012) and at several international art spaces and museums around the world.

More information: https://goo.gl/aT7aWZ  

Georgina Maxim 
Video portrait: https://youtu.be/2sTfNETFLM4 

Georgina Maxim (Zimbabwe) - Photo by Cynthia Matonhodze

Georgina Maxim (Zimbabwe) – Photo by Cynthia Matonhodze

Georgina Maxim was born 1980 in Harare, Zimbabwe. Maxim is known for both working as artist and curator with over a decade of arts management and curatorial practice. Maxim together with two other artists (Misheck Masamvu and Gareth Nyandoro) co-founded Village Unhu in 2012, an artist collective space that has been providing studio spaces, exhibitions, workshops and residency programs for artists – young and professional.

Georgina Maxim’s work combines weaving, stitch work and the utilisation of found textiles creating objects that evade definition. The dresses are deconstructed, and at times reconstructed to find new ways of giving tribute to and reflection upon the person that owned the original garment. Maxim describes it as ‘the memory of’. Currently, Maxim studies African Verbal and Visual Arts – Languages, Curation and Arts at the University of Bayreuth in Germany.

Makouvia Kokou Ferdinand 
Video portrait: https://youtu.be/lZCcRSab2hA

Makouvia Kokou Ferdinand – a student at the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris – shares his life and work between Lomé and Paris. Both his sculptural and performance work emanate from the personal experiences of the artist. He plays with borders and mixes memories, materials and cultural references. Building on traditional Mina culture, his gaze on contemporary society is unique, sometimes ironic and often moving. He is a recipient of the Dauphine Prize for Contemporary Art, the Young Talent Revelation Prize for Plastic Arts ADAGP as well as the Aurige Finance and the Amis des Beaux-Arts et Juvenars-IESA Prize. His work will be displayed at Du Salon Du Dessin in Paris (23-25 March, 2018), as part of a group exhibition at Anne de Villepoix Gallery during the first half of 2018 and in a solo show at Vincent Sator Gallery in April and May 2019.

About the Henrike Grohs Art Award

“The Henrike Grohs Art Award is a biennial award dedicated to artists living and working in Africa. Yet the message sent goes far beyond the continent. It is a universal address, a call for reflection and action”, said the jury members Koyo Kouoh (Artistic Director, RAW Material Company, Dakar), Laurence Bonvin (artist and representative of the Grohs family, Berlin), Raphael Chikukwa (Chief Curator, National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare) and Simon Njami (Curator, Paris).

The prize recognises the lifetime achievements of the former Head of the Goethe-Institut in Abidjan, Henrike Grohs, who was killed on 13 March 2016 in a terrorist attack in Grand-Bassam, Côte d’Ivoire. The award intends to continue her special commitment to support artists in Africa and make a contribution towards international dialogue.

The award will be awarded biennially to an artist or an arts collective practicing in the field of visual arts. Artistic quality is the most important criteria for the award. Collaborative partnership, imparting knowledge to other artists and social engagement are decisive elements for recognition.

Makouvia Kokou Ferdinand (Togo) - Photo by Peter Houston

Makouvia Kokou Ferdinand (Togo) – Photo by Peter Houston

Henrike Grohs Art Award: Mission Statement

“On 13 March 2016 in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, Henrike Grohs was killed by the blindest hatred as she was spending time with friends at the beach. Two months before, a young photographer, Leila Alaoui, 32, was shot in Burkina Faso by the ‘same people’. Many more, too many more, have fallen simply because they were at the wrong place at the wrong time; simply because a handful of fundamentalists started a war of terror. We are facing troublesome times and it is our duty to refuse to surrender to fatalism. All those deaths must be transformed into something stronger than death, into something bigger than ourselves. Henrike was working for a better world. A world where, ‘a proud heart can survive a general failure because such failure does not prick its pride.’” (Chinua Achebe: Things Fall Apart).

The Henrike Grohs Art Award is established as an answer to all those who think that we cannot live together in a world where sharing would be the main aim. Where borders would have no meaning and where humanity would be the only matter to fight for – that is humanity as a whole, as something that cannot be destroyed and that remains untouched. The message is clear: we shall not surrender. We shall, as Henrike did, stand for what we believe in, without any compromise.

The award is dedicated to artists practicing in Africa. Yet the message that is sent is a universal address, a call for reflection and action. Art is probably the one field where no translation is needed. It is that universal language which transforms the ‘chaotic world of sensations’ that we all share, into forms of representations and relations. The Henrike Grohs Art Award aims at strengthening artists and encouraging them in their quest for a world of togetherness and dialogue. Art knows neither borders nor religion. It is the very expression of that flame that keeps us going, from North to South and East to West. It is the best expression of our unbreakable faith in our humanity.”

The Jury members:
Koyo Kouoh, Laurence Bonvin, Raphael Chikukwa and Simon Njami


Henrike Grohs Art Award: video statements about the prize

Johannes Ebert (Secretary General of the Goethe-Institut, Munich): https://youtu.be/uAmVNxggLek
Koyo Kouoh (Jury member; Artistic Director, RAW Material Company, Dakar): https://youtu.be/lXnerwvJea4 
Laurence Bonvin (Jury member; artist, representative of the Grohs family, Berlin): https://youtu.be/HHrUN1-UqsA
Raphael Chikukwa (Jury member; Chief Curator, National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare): https://youtu.be/pIzNF5waGGQ 
Simon Njami (Jury member; Curator, Paris): https://youtu.be/wPWqYf0ETsQ 

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ZIM, BOTS, MOZA REVIVE MASSIVE RAILWAY PROJECT
February 27, 2018 | 0 Comments

Zimbabwe and Botswana have revived talks on the construction of a railway line that would link the two countries to Mozambique.  

Zimbabwe’s Foreign Affairs and International Trade Minister, Dr Sibusiso Moyo

Zimbabwe’s Foreign Affairs and International Trade Minister, Dr Sibusiso Moyo

If the project succeeds, it would become one of the most notable infrastructure projects in the region, as it would link more than two Southern African Development Community countries.

The railway line is expected to link Francistown in Botswana, Bulawayo in Zimbabwe and the Mozambican port of Techobanine to facilitate enhanced regional trade.

In an interview in Harare, Zimbabwe’s Foreign Affairs and International Trade Minister, Dr Sibusiso Moyo, said the three countries have revived dialogue over the envisaged railway line.

Moyo said the matter was one of the items under discussion during Zimbabwe President, Emmerson Mnangagwa’s state visit to Botswana last week.

“There were a lot of talks that we held with our colleagues in Botswana on economic projects that will facilitate greater regional integration.

“One of the projects that we talked about was the construction of a railway line, which will be a tripartite agreement between Zimbabwe, Botswana and Mozambique. The plan is that this railway line will get to the port in Mozambique thereby laying the platform for enhancement of trade,” he said.

Moyo said the three countries are now working on timelines to facilitate implementation of the project.

“This is going to be a win-win project for all the three countries. Respective Ministers from all three countries are now working on this deal and we have set the timelines for feedback.

“We are also going to review the agreements that have been already signed and give ourselves timeframes for implementation as prescribed by these agreements.”

Moyo said the three countries’ Governments as well as private partners are expected to provide funding for the project.

In 2016, the three countries signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) for the project.

According to that MoU, each country is expected to provide US$200 million towards the cost of the project with the rest of the work to be done through public-private partnerships (PPPs).

Upon completion, the venture will facilitate inter-regional trade through the movement of passenger rail traffic and up to 12 million tonnes of goods per annum through the three countries.

*Southern Times Africa

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“Do Not Ignore Africa” – President Akufo-Addo Appeals To US Governors
February 26, 2018 | 0 Comments

The President of the Republic, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, has urged Governors of the United States of America not to ignore Africa, stating his belief that “this can be Africa’s century”.

According to President Akufo-Addo, growth in Africa, in 2015 was second only to that of Asia, adding that six of the world’s ten fastest growing economies, this year, are in Africa.

“We are rich in natural resources, and in possession of nearly 30 percent of the earth’s remaining mineral resources. We have a vibrant young population, and, though we still have important security challenges, we are more at peace than before,” he said.

The President noted that with the historic decision of the African Union to bring into being, on 21st March, 2018, the Continental Free Trade Area, the agenda of regional integration, which will establish a market of some 2 billion people in 20 years, presents immense opportunities to bring prosperity to Africa with hard work, enterprise and creativity.

“This is the time to look at Africa”, he added.

President Akufo-Addo made this known when he delivered the keynote address at the National Governors Association 2018 Winter Meeting, in Washington DC, United States of America, on Sunday, 25th February, 2018.

Whilst acknowledging the disheartening spectre of African youths crossing the Sahara desert on foot and drown in the Mediterranean Sea, in a desperate bid to reach the mirage of a better life in Europe, President Akufo-Addo explained that the current structure of African economies, which are dependent on the production and export of raw materials, cannot create prosperity.

“These economies cannot produce wealth and prosperity for the masses on the continent. It, therefore, drives the determination to seek a much better standard of living out of Africa, thereby, fuelling the refugee crises and the numerous counts of illegal migrations,” he said.

The large wave of migrations into the United States from Ireland and Italy, in the 19th century, the President added, has completely subsided because the economies of the two countries are working properly.

It is for this reason that President Akufo-Addo stated that “the only way to ensuring prosperity in Africa and jobs for our young populations is through value addition activities, in a transformed and diversified, modern economy, in which we take full advantage of the digital revolution.”

He continued, “In other words, the industrial development of our continent, and we are determined to ensure the realisation of this, so that our young people can stay and devote their great energies to the building of a great Africa.”

The President was confident that it is only Asians who can engineer, in a generation, their transition from poverty to prosperity.

“We are determined to do that in our generation in Ghana, on the continent, and ensure that succeeding generations will be neither victims nor pawns of the global order,” he added.

This, the President indicated, will serve as the impetus for re-shaping the continent and charting a new path of growth and development in freedom, which will lift the long suffering African masses out of poverty into the realms of prosperity and dignified existence.

*Presidency Ghana

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South Sudan sentences South African national to death
February 25, 2018 | 0 Comments

By Prince Kurupati

William John Endley is  a former South African National Defence Forces (SANDF) Colonel

William John Endley is a former South African National Defence Forces (SANDF) Colonel

William John Endley, a former South African National Defence Forces (SANDF) Colonel was recently sentenced to death by hanging by a Judge in South Sudan. Endley was charged with conspiracy to overthrow the government of President Salva Kiir, illegal entry to South Sudan and spying.

A private radio station in South Sudan, Eye Radio was the first to break the news via its official Twitter handle before BBC corroborated the story. The official tweet sent by Eye Radio read;

“William John Endley, the South African accused of conspiring against the Kiir administration in 2016, has been sentenced to death by hanging. #SouthSudan

10:46 AM – Feb 23, 2018”

Endley came to South Sudan as a security advisor to the rebel leader, Riek Machar. Machar is a former deputy to President Salva Kiir. The two fell out soon after the peace agreement signed with Sudan with Machar going on to form his own resistance movement.

Endley was arrested in August 2016 after a clash between Machar’s bodyguards and government forces. At the time, Endley was arrested alongside Machar’s spokesman, James Gatdet Dak.

The two, Endley and James Gatdek Dak first appeared in court last year in October. Gatdek Dak who was charged with a single crime, conspiracy to overthrow the government of President Kiir received his sentence thereafter, a 21-year jail term to be followed by death by hanging. Gatdek Dak’s sentence caused an uproar locally and internationally with human rights group condemning the sentence as unjust.

Endley appeared in his last court appearance without a defence counsel as his previous lawyer left him over a month ago. Before leaving, Endley’s the then lawyer argued that he be freed using the Cessation of Hostilities Agreement which states that all sides in South Sudan have to release political detainees and prisoners of war. Endley’s new lawyer, Gar Adel who was supposed to represent him in the final trial could not do so as he was barred by the court after he pleaded for more time to familiarise himself with the case.

During Endley’s last court appearance, the court reported that Endley worked as a Major General for the SPLA-IO, Machar’s rebel organisation. In his role, the court reported that Endley would procure firearms and ammunition and helped the SPLA-IO with military expertise. According to the court, Endley’s role in the organisation was in violation of South Sudan’s Criminal Procedure Act and the South Sudan National Security Act of 2014.

The presiding judge, Ladu Armenio while delivering the sentence in Arabic said that Endley’s actions endangered state security and the economy of the nation. Judge Armenio passed a sentence of two consecutive prison terms of nine years after which he will be hanged.

A court official translated the sentence from Arabic into English.

Charmaine Quinn, Endley’s sister in Cape Town, South Africa said the family is devastated by the sentence. She said that the family has not received any news from the South African Embassy in Juba, South Sudan but they have approached the government in Johannesburg for assistance. She said the family is trying to stay positive and they want the government to have Endley extradited to South Africa for a new trial.

David Shearer, Chief of the UN Mission in South Sudan condemned the sentences for Gatdek Dak and Endley.

Endley has a window of 17 days in which to make an appeal.

 

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Entrepreneurship is not a choice but a MUST for all Africans-Badou Kane
February 24, 2018 | 0 Comments

By Ajong Mbapndah L

All Africans have to learn how to become entrepreneurs’ whether you went to school or not says Badou Kane

All Africans have to learn how to become entrepreneurs’ whether you went to school or not says Badou Kane

When dreams for a career in basketball were scuttled by injurious, Badou Kane found a calling in entrepreneurship, mentoring and empowering the next generation of African Youth. From his base in Senegal, Badou Kane  is using a variety of programs, and initiatives to instill positive values, and hope in the African youth on how to turn adversity into opportunity. Pained by the travails of those who risk it all to leave Africa in quest of greener pastures; Badou is taking  on the onerous task of helping young Africans to understand that with their potential, it is possible to make it big in Africa. Entrepreneurship is not a choice, but a must for all Africans, says Badou in an  exclusive interview with PAV to shed light on his vision and projects.

Badou Kane is one of the most inspiring entrepreneurs in Africa, let’s start this interview by paraphrasing a quote we got from a talk you gave at the Cheick Anta Diop University in Senegal in July of 2014, having a positive impact on others is how Africans in all walks of life should measure leadership, in 2018, how much of this are you seeing in the continent? 

I would say not much… numbers don’t lie. The fact that we have over 500 million Africans living under $1.50 a day shows that there isn’t enough sharing among us. Two things are to be shared knowledge and money in order to have a positive impact on others.

You equally said Africa is the richest continent with the poorest with the poorest people, not because not because we are poor but because we are poor in minds, in this age and time, what needs to be done to change this mindset? 

Wow! A good question with many solutions I will quote a few:

Let s start by stopping lies and getting rid of our complexes of inferiority and superiority. As long as you are on the right path do not worry about what people think of you or what you do. Then:

  1. We have to regain the control of our education. Our curriculum should be written by Africans that understand the realities of the continent.
  2. All Africans have to learn how to become entrepreneurs’ whether you went to school or not, whether you went far into your schooling or not. Entrepreneurship is not a choice but a MUST for all Africans.
  3. We have to all learn how to go from nothing to something. At least be able to earn 4 dollars a day.
  4. Every one of us has a hidden treasure but to find it we have to be willing to sweat cry and bleed. Through a strong will, endurance, and perseverance we will find our hidden treasures
  5. We have to all start some type of a business (small, medium. or big). Do not be afraid to start small. If you don t know how to go from nothing contact me I will show you how.
  6. Last but not least once you achieve success NEVER FORGET WHERE YOU COME FROM and share part of the knowledge and money you earned by teaching others your path to success. Find honest hard working people and show them the way to success that you know.

From your entrepreneurship and the mentorship that you have done, what difference have you succeeded in making, what are some of the positive stories that you can share with us? 

Another good question. We have thousands of stories to tell. As a matter of fact we are preparing a book. You will already find lots of the testimonies on my social media pages. We have created multi-millionaires in CFA. We have kept people out of jails. We have saved families that were struggling to eat one decent meal a day today they are eating at least 2 meals a day. We have prevented people from risking their lives and dying at sea or in the desert through illegal migration (a major problem in Africa). I can go on; we have changed or impacted thousands and thousands of lives in Africa.  We have saved relationships between fathers and sons, prevented people from blaming governments and environments in general. Some of the people we trained built houses for their mothers. Let me just say that thanks to the Almighty we have done a lot through our training centers, our conferences in schools and different institutions, our interventions on TV s and radios.

You literally grew up in America; you made it there, what motivated you to move back to Senegal and any regrets? 

You know that old saying: “there is no place like home”. I had a mother and father that gave a lot to Africa their names were Madeleine Sidibe and Bocar Kane. I wanted to follow on their footsteps. I remember one day we were having lunch at the house; a neighbor walked in and said that he did not have something to feed his family and my mom asked us to stop eating. We were all eating in a big bowl; she took it poured more foods in it and gave it to the man to take to his house. Then she told us to eat ” shaï” (bread and butter + hot tea) I always wanted to help develop a larger middle class in Africa. I love the fact that I was given a chance to be able to change lives and I have zero regrets.

At a time when many young people are risking life crossing the Sahara, ending up as slaves in Libya, dying in overloaded boats that sink in the Mediterranean, just to get to Europe, how challenging is it to make  a convincing case to them that in Africa, they can still make it and make it big? 

It’s very challenging but with a very good argument they will stay. They just want better alternatives and concrete solutions. The youth of Africa has lost the last piece of hope that they had left in them. They have been betrayed by their respective country leaders. But today we give them hope again by showing them that yes it is possible to make it here in Africa. Once upon a time the Italians and the Irish were fleeing to America; today they are proud to stay in their countries. I have faith that one day the Almighty will give us the leaders that will finally save the Africans. And our people will stay. It’s always been about Africa but not about the Africans but I can feel in the air that it is about to be about the Africans themselves as they will gain a better hold of their environment.

And on the flipside, when you look at the economic and political realities of the continent, the corruption, the leaders in power for over three decades, do you actually fault them and some may even say oh if Badou Kane did not have the opportunities he had out of Senegal, he may not be as successful as he is ,what is your take on this? 

Of course our leaders are to be blamed for some of it but not all. A bad head of state can’t stop a Badou Kane from washing cars to feed his family for example. We cannot spend the next 5 decades pointing the finger at them as it is a waste of time. Let us focus on ourselves on how we can do it ourselves. It is possible as I am showing the people in Senegal. Senegal gave me a peaceful environment, and people willing to do it themselves but as far as the rest is concerned we snatch what we want through discipline and hard work. We create opportunities NOTHING is handed to us.

Could you shed more ore light on your company LXG International Inc and your other programs that are used in helping to the build the next generation of entrepreneurs in Senegal, a young Senegalese told us that within five years you have turned atleast ten young Senegalese into millionaires, is this true and if so how have you done this? 

The major program is called Risk Innovation Social Entrepreneurship. I started it in Senegal on December 12 2012 to fight unemployment and poverty in Africa. I don t believe in poverty in Africa and we have the solution. Every African should be at least able to cover his basic needs of having a place to live, food to eat, a decent education, and the capability to pay for basic medical bills.

The RISE program is an entrepreneurship and leadership program that teaches any individual how to go from nothing to something. It’s a very tough program and at the end of it the best candidates receive an investment of 4 to 18 thousand dollars. Directly linked to me, 6 have made millions the rest are on the way. Indirectly, meaning those that were trained by us but went on their own, quite a few.

Since 2012 we have trained thousands and thousands of people, hundreds have started their own small businesses and we have invested in at least 15.

Another program is called DSB which stands for ” Demal Suñu Bopp” meaning it lets  do it ourselves. It is an economic movement that I created again to fight unemployment and poverty. It is a continuation of RISE, to help us raise awareness with a broader audience to teach them the same thing: how to go from nothing to something. The motto of the movement is “get richer to serve more”. There are thousands of members throughout Senegal with one thing in common, they are doing it themselves, and all we provide is the coaching through a system that allows them to get it done without the help of the government, or any form of entity.

What criteria are used in selecting those who benefit from your knowledge and resources and how has the government of Senegal viewed or supported these initiatives? 

The criteria are quite simple: discipline, a good heart, a willingness to learn and get better, and a capacity to grasp our teachings. The government has supported me by letting me do what I do without bothering me. I couldn’t t tell you what their views are.

One of the latest initiatives you are floating now is an entrepreneurship competition or program with the concept of people starting and growing a business with $3.50, can you shed more light on this? 

We have 500 Million people living under $1.50 a day. To fight this and the illegal migration that you mentioned earlier we launched this challenge. The candidates have to start a business with $3.50 or less and a month later they will have to show their financial results and immediate social impact. There will be 3 rounds. The winner will take home about 2000 dollars and there will also be a special prize for the best female entrepreneur. The objective is to spread the fact it is possible to start with little or no money, and to help people understand that they can do it themselves.

Is this new initiative going to be limited just to Senegal or there are plans to expand the concept to other parts of the continent? 

It is opened to all Africans. They can participate in Senegal.  And anybody in any given country can run with the concept and we will assist him or her.

Africa has a very strong diaspora, how can this diaspora be turned into a solid force that can participate in a more significant and impactful  way in transforming the continent ? 

Our leaders have to create a healthy secure welcoming environment that will make them want to come back. In the meantime the diaspora cannot wait for our leaders. They have to at least share their experiences with the people that did not have a chance to leave the continent. For example they can try to at least share their knowledge with someone on the continent. Nowadays through social media “everyone far is close”. We need everyone in order to get this ship moving. Remember there are always two things to share knowledge and money.

You are also author of the book Fortress of a Leader, what is the message that you see to convey with the book? 

Some characters that one might need to become a leader. It is more like a handy pocket guide to leadership.

A last question on how you view the future for young Africans and the continent as a whole, what are your hopes and fears? 

Hopes: a new generation of very strong leaders with new foundations are on the RISE.

My fears are that our youth gets consumed by sports music dance or politics thinking that those are the only ways to make it in Africa.

Thanks for granting this interview Badou

Thanks for having me. Stay blessed Ajong.

 

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Africa’s little miracle nation turns fifty
February 23, 2018 | 0 Comments

From apparently hopeless beginnings, Mauritius has become one of Africa’s most celebrated countries. But tough challenges are on the horizon.

BY SEÁN CAREY*

Mauritius. Credit: Miwok.

Mauritius. Credit: Miwok.

The story of how Mauritius defied the gloomy predictions of its fate is well told. A few years before independence in 1968, Nobel-prize-winning economist James Meade wrote the little island in the Indian Ocean off as a basket case. A few years after independence, writer V. S. Naipaul dismissed the nation as an “overcrowded barracoon”.

Yet Mauritius proved them wrong and went on to become one of Africa’s most lauded nations. It regularly tops indices for political freedoms, rule of law and human development on the continent. It has had ten competitive elections and seven peaceful transfers of power. And it is frequently held up as an exemplar of political stability and cohesion, containing within it several ethnic groups – including Hindus, Muslims, Afro-Creoles, and Sino- and Franco-Mauritius – all living together in relative harmony.

In 2011, the island’s various successes even led Joseph Stiglitz to wax lyrical about what he called “The Mauritius Miracle“. The Nobel laureate called on the US and other advanced economies to emulate the country and learn from its approach to free education, healthcare and strong social security net.

As it prepares to turn 50 years old on 12 March, the current government is understandably keen to build on this reputation and legacy. Among other things, the ruling coalition, led by the 56-year-old Prime Minister Pravind Jugnauth, has said it wants Mauritius to go from being an upper-middle-income country to a high-income one in the coming years.

As a plucky outsider that has always exceeded expectation, this may seem like a viable goal for the island. However, as it settles into its fifth decade of independence, Mauritius may find that it has to come up with some new ways of thinking if it is to continue to develop – both economically and politically – rather than stumble into a mid-life crisis.

Betting on blue

Economically, Mauritius’ growth over the last five years has been in the range of a modest 3-4%. The Bank of Mauritius has forecast growth of 4.2% for 2018. This would be enviable for many countries, but is a significant slowdown compared to the heady years of 1980s and 1990s when the economy expanded mostly on the back of the sugar industry, tourism, textiles and financial services.

The big hope of the current government is that a similar boost could now come from the ocean economy. The idea is that activities such as fishing, the extraction of hydrocarbons and minerals, marine biotechnology, and the generation of renewable energy will supercharge GDP for years to come.

So far the most significant development on this front has come from fish farming, with some products now being exported to Europe and the US. Overall, however, it is evident that significant financial and technical expertise from overseas will be required if other more capital-intensive businesses are going to take off. As a 2017 World Bank report warned, doubling Mauritius’ ocean economy “is possible and worthwhile, but it will take time”.

In trying to attract foreign direct investment, Mauritius certainly has an advantage in the fact that global institutions have long heaped praise on the island for its stable governance, democratic norms and openness to business. It also has the benefit of having a reputation for having shown vision and flexibility to new economic challenges in the past. As the Bertelsmann Stiftungs’ Transformation Index (BTI) 2018 country report puts it: “Mauritius’ governments have shown their creativity in the past at adapting to new geopolitical and geo-economic circumstances”.

Mauritius’ dynastic politics

Socially, Mauritius has been praised for how its several different ethnic groups co-exist cooperatively. One dynamic contributing to this stability may be the fact that the island has no indigenous population, meaning no single group has any greater claim to the island than any other. Another factor that may add to good relations is the high population density; 1.3 million citizens squeezed onto 2,040 square km enhances the need for cordial interchanges.

However, a third important factor is the unspoken division of political power. For example, Franco- and Sino-Mauritians do not seek political office by and large, leaving the field open to aspiring Hindus, Muslims and Afro-Creoles.

This avoids certain tensions and rivalry, though it has also contributed to the fact that Mauritius’ political system has always been dominated by middle-class men from the Hindu community, a group that makes up just over half the population. In fact, despite having enjoyed seven transfers of power, the very top of Mauritius’ politics has been even more exclusive. For 48 of the past 50 years, the country has been led by either Seewoosagur Ramgoolam or Anerood Jugnauth, or more recently by their respective sons Navin and Pravind.

Although this has occurred against a backdrop of impressive democratic engagement and vibrancy, there are signs the Mauritian people are getting tired after half a century in which the premiership has been almost completely controlled by just two families. In January 2017, Anerood Jugnauth passed power to his son without the say-so of the electorate. Knowing how much this move contributed to its unpopularity and deepened its reputation for corruption and cronyism, the main party in the ruling coalition, the Mouvement Socialiste Militant (MSM), decided to avoid contesting a recent by-election.

The Chagos question

Whatever their political differences, there is one cause that currently unites all mainstream Mauritian politicians: the Chagos islands.

This archipelago had been an integral part of Mauritian territory since 1814. But a few years before Mauritius gained independence from the UK, the islands were carved off to become the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT). The UK lent the archipelago’s largest island, Diego Garcia, to the US to use as a strategic military base. In the process, around 1,500 islanders were forcibly removed and abandoned in Port Louis, the Mauritian capital, and, to a lesser extent, the Seychelles.

Without questioning the continued operation of the US base, Mauritian policy in recent years has been to dispute the UK’s claim to BIOT and its appalling treatment of the exiled islanders. A Mauritian resolution at the UN to seek an advisory opinion from the International Court of Justice on the Chagos’ sovereignty was passed in June 2017 by 94 to 15. Interestingly, most European countries – including France, Germany and Italy – as well as China abstained, despite considerable pressure from the UK and US. The Court in The Hague is due to give its verdict later this year or in 2019.

New challenges

As the Chagos issue, together with the country’s economic progress and resilience illustrates, Mauritius has come a long way in establishing its independence. However, the Jugnauth father-to-son transfer of power last year along with the alleged involvement of political elites in corruption and drug scandals casts a shadow on the country’s positive prospects.

Among other things, it clearly shows the increasingly urgent need for Mauritius reconfigure its political leadership. As the forthcoming BTI report 2018 puts it: “New and younger politicians, not strongly affiliated with the ruling elite, can help to further the country’s image as a post-colonial success story, which is highly likely to continue.”

As Mauritius reaches the 50th anniversary of its independence, Meade’s and Naipaul’s predictions have been proved decisively wrong. However, building on this and becoming a high-income country may be more challenging than the current government is prepared to admit.

*Culled from African Arguments.Seán Carey is honorary senior research fellow in the School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester and fellow of the Young Foundation.

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Mercer announces Strategic Partnership with Advisory K in Zimbabwe
February 23, 2018 | 0 Comments

Global Human Resources consultancy ties up with leading local consulting firm to bring leading HR solutions to the local market

PRETORIA, South Africa, February 22, 2018/ — Mercer (www.Mercer.com), a global consulting leader in advancing health, wealth and career, and a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies (NYSE: MMC) (www.MMC.com), has entered into a strategic partnership agreement with Advisory K (www.AdvisoryK.co.zw), a Zimbabwe based Consulting firm, to bring leading talent management, consulting, data driven solutions and insights to the local market.

Clients will have access to a range of best practice Mercer solutions, driven by the global thought leadership benefiting current and prospective new Mercer and Advisory K clients in Zimbabwe.

Peter Botha, CEO of Mercer in Africa, said: “We are honoured to partner with such a leading and reputable player in the local market, we are excited about the broad knowledge this partnership will bring to help Zimbabwean organizations thrive in HR management and workforce performance.”

Advisory K specialises in optimizing organizations strategies through its six practices, which include organisation transformation, people and HR solutions, research and analytics. The firm is viewed as a pioneer for culture transformation in organisations that embrace performance as part of their culture.

Ethel Kuuya, Managing Director of Advisory K adds: “As a recognised representative of Mercer in Zimbabwe, we are committed to strengthening and expanding the provision of leading organisation solutions to all sectors in Zimbabwe. This partnership is timely as organisations at large are in a transformational spirit and by joining forces with Mercer we are now able to enhance bespoke change solutions for our valued clients.”

Mercer (www.Mercer.com) delivers advice and technology-driven solutions that help organizations meet the health, wealth and career needs of a changing workforce. Mercer’s more than 22,000 employees are based in 44 countries and the firm operates in over 130 countries. Mercer is a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies (NYSE: MMC) (www.MMC.com), the leading global professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. With nearly 65,000 colleagues and annual revenue over $14 billion, Marsh & McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. Marsh & McLennan Companies is also the parent company of Marsh, (http://usa.Marsh.com) which advises individual and commercial clients of all sizes on insurance broking and innovative risk management solutions; Guy Carpenter (https://goo.gl/8h8iet), which develops advanced risk, reinsurance and capital strategies that help clients grow profitably and pursue emerging opportunities; and Oliver Wyman (www.OliverWyman.com),  which serves as a critical strategic, economic and brand advisor to private sector and governmental clients. For more information, visit  www.Mercer.com. Follow Mercer on Twitter @Mercer(www.Twitter.com/mercer).

About Advisory K
Advisory K (www.AdvisoryK.co.zw) is a business advisory firm that helps their clients through five areas of deep skills: Analytics, Research, Strategy, Transformation and People. As a pioneer in both analytics and strategy implementation support in this market they have managed to develop and roll out projects to help clients to take their business to the next level.

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Landing of South Atlantic Undersea Cable in Brazil signals new chapter in Africa-America’s Telecoms
February 23, 2018 | 0 Comments
Celebrating the milestone: Moroni Torgan: Deputy Mayor of Fortaleza, Manuel Homem: Angolan Secretary of State for Information and Technology, António Nunes: CEO of Angola Cables, Inácio Arruda: Secretary of Science, Technology and Higher Education of Ceará, Camilo Santana: Governor of Ceará, César Ribeiro: Secretary of Economic Development of Ceará

Celebrating the milestone: Moroni Torgan: Deputy Mayor of Fortaleza, Manuel Homem: Angolan Secretary of State for Information and Technology, António Nunes: CEO of Angola Cables, Inácio Arruda: Secretary of Science, Technology and Higher Education of Ceará, Camilo Santana: Governor of Ceará, César Ribeiro: Secretary of Economic Development of Ceará

Angola Cables, a telecommunications multinational, has reported that the South Atlantic Cable System (SACS) has made landfall at Fortaleza on the Brazilian coast.

Company CEO, António Nunes said that the arrival and installation of SACS on the Brazilian coast was “an important strategic milestone for the company, Angola and Africa as it will be the first direct link between the Americas and the African continent, offering a faster routing with higher capacity.”

Now entering the final phase of completion, SACS is expected to be fully operational by the third quarter of 2018. The undersea cable is one of the most advanced submarine telecommunications systems and will have initial capacity of 40Tbps (100Gbps x 100 wavelength x 4 pairs of fibre).

“Once SACS has been fully commissioned, we will see a significant improvement in communications and content sharing between Angola, African countries and the Americas. With SACS, the delay in transporting digital content, known as latency, will be reduced fivefold, from the current 350 thousandths of a second to just over 60 thousandths of a second.”

“Investments made by Angola Cables and its partners in underwater cable systems, such as the West African Cable System (WACS) and Monet – connecting North and South America – combined with other investments in terrestrial infrastructure such as data centres, is opening up global communications networks. It is also reorienting worldwide internet traffic and is effectively positioning Angola as a telecommunications hub in sub-Saharan Africa,” concluded Nunes.

SACS makes landfall: The South Atlantic Cable System (SACS) between Africa and South America makes landfall at Fortaleza on the Brazilian coast.

SACS makes landfall: The South Atlantic Cable System (SACS) between Africa and South America makes landfall at Fortaleza on the Brazilian coast.

Angola Cables is an Angolan telecommunications multinational founded in 2009, operating in the wholesale market its business is the sale of international transmission capacity through submarine fibre optic cables and IP Transit. SACS, Monet and WACS are the three submarine cable systems operated by Angola Cables, which connect four continents (South America, North America, Africa and Europe). Angola Cables manages Angonix, an Internet hub located in Luanda and the third largest in Africa. Angola Cables also manages two data centers: one in Fortaleza (Brazil) connected to SACS and Monet and another in Luanda, connected to SACS and WACS.

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