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NJ Ayuk in Billions at Play Explains How Energy Underpins the African Dream
August 28, 2019 | 0 Comments
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After Steve Harvey, Hollywood star Danny Glover visits Ghana, advocating “Go Back Home”
August 26, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Amos Fofung

Danny Glover (left) urges African American to reconnect with Africa. (photo: kasapa fm)

Danny Glover (left) urges African American to reconnect with Africa. (photo: kasapa fm)

Days after US famous comedian and host of The Steve Harvey Show, alongside his family visited Ghana urging Africans in the diaspora to return home, another American TV star, Danny Glover, a legend in Hollywood is advocating “Go Back Home” as he visits Ghana in commemoration of the year of return.

Speaking at the airport in Ghana, the movie director, producer and acclaimed humanitarian said it is important for the “African diaspora to reconnect with Africa” reason why he’s advocating the Go Back Home”.

“It was important for me to be part of this trip because I think it is important for all African Americans to build a strong relationship with the wider African diaspora and the continent of Africa itself,” he said in a tweet about his visit.

Launched last year in Washington, D.C., by Ghana’s President Nana Akufo-Addo, for Africans in the diaspora to visit the West African country as part of the commemoration 400th year since the first African slaves landed in Virginia, the initiative has gain commendation with several celebrities and Africans in across the globe make their way into Ghana to learn more about their root.

Arriving Ghana alongside officials of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Danny Glover and his team travelled from Jamestown, Virginia in the United States of America to Jamestown, Accra, Ghana to commemorate Jamestown to Jamestown, on the same route the first slave travelled on.

‘Jamestown to Jamestown’ kicked off on August 18 in Washington, D.C. where participants travelled via bus to Jamestown, Virginia, for a prayer vigil and candle-lighting ceremony.

The ceremony marked the African “Maafa,” a term that describes the suffering embedded in the past four centuries related to enslavement.

“Jamestown to Jamestown represents one of the most powerful moments in the history of the Black Experience,” says NAACP President and CEO Derrick Johnson. “We are now able to actualize the healing and collective unity so many generations have worked to achieve in ways which bring power to our communities in America, Africa and throughout our Diaspora.”

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#VoiceandChoice & State of Women in SADC Barometers launched
August 23, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Wallace Mawire

Gender activists from across Southern Africa will on 22 August launch the#VoiceandChoice 2019 Barometer alongside the  State of Women in SADC 2019 report.

The Barometer has been produced for the last eleven years by the Southern African Gender Protocol Alliance, a network of Women’s Rights Organisations that campaigned for the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development in 2008, its updating and alignment to the Sustainable Development Goals in 2016.

In keeping with global and regional trends, reflected in the #MeToo, #TimesUp, #TotalShutdown and related campaigns, the 2019 Barometer departs with past tradition in focusing specifically on Sexual Reproductive Health and Right (SRHR).

The 2019 #VoiceandChoice Barometer is the first civil society shadow report on the recently adopted SADC SRHR strategy.  It measures 100 indicators in seven thematic areas including Sexual and Reproductive Health; adolescent SRHR; safe abortion; GBV; HIV and AIDS; harmful practices and sexual diversity. The State of Women report details progress made against the provisions of the SADC Gender Protocol using two important yardsticks, the empirical SADC Gender and Development Index (SGDI) and Citizen Score Card (CSC) to measure progress made towards Gender Equality in the region.

The key findings of the two reports include:

  • With an SGDI score of 60%, just one percentage point higher than last year, the region needs to up its game if it is to achieve gender equality by 2030. Seychelles has the highest SGDI score and South Africa the third highest SGDI score in the region.
  • The CSC which measures citizen’s opinions and perceptions on government effort on addressing gender equality has increased from 62% in 2018 to 66% in 2019 for the region, showing that citizens are slightly more buoyant than what the actual figures show regarding the progress on gender equality.
  • The SADC Gender Progress score which measures gender attitudes has increased to from 53% in 2017 to 60% in 2019. Seychelles and Malawi (66%) have the highest GPS. 49% of respondents said that people should be treated the same whether they are women or men, yet 46% agreed or strongly agreed that a woman should obey her husband.
  • SRHR is now firmly on the Southern African agenda but gaps remain in data collection, legislation, policy, and service delivery for women and girls. The region has made significant strides with the adoption of the Mahe Declaration on SRHR (2016) and the SADC SRHR Strategy (2018) with an accompanying score card. Using the SRHR indicators in the SADC strategy for which data could be gathered, South Africa leads the way, with progressive laws and policies on abortion and sexual diversity, but still many challenges with implementation.
  • Only two SADC countries, Seychelles and Mauritius, meet the global target of less than 70 deaths per 100 000 live births for pregnant women and girls. The maternal mortality rate is ten times more in the DRC.
  • Adolescent fertility ratios in the region range from 27 per 1000 women in Mauritius to 152 per 1000 women in Angola.
  • Only six SADC countries (DRC, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, South Africa and Zambia) have stand-alone Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (ASRHR) policies or strategies. Only five countries (Madagascar, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Tanzania) in SADC do not require parental consent for adolescents to access SRHR services.
  • The age of access to contraceptives in SADC ranges from 12 in five countries to 18 in one.
  • Only South Africa and Mozambique have legislation that allows abortion on demand in the first trimester. Abortion is available under certain circumstances in all SADC countries, with varying degrees of restriction.
  • Women, and especially young women, comprise the highest proportion of those living with HIV and AIDS, except for the islands (Madagascar, Mauritius and Seychelles) where intravenous drug needles are the main means of transmission.
  • Only six countries have valid National Action Plans (NAPs) on GBV, 10 have expired NAPS and only three have fully costed NAPs. South Africa broke new ground with a presidential summit on GBV in 2018, and is establishing a multi sector forum to tackle GBV head on.
  • While all SADC countries meet the requirement of the minimum age of 18 for marriage for men, only three countries (Malawi, Mozambique and South Africa) stipulate 18 as the minimum age of marriage for women and men with no exceptions, i.e. are compliant with the SADC Protocol on Gender and Development. In eight SADC countries (Angola, DRC, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe) over one third of all young women are married by the age of 18.
  • Homosexuality is now legal in one third of Southern African countries including South Africa, Seychelles, Angola, Mozambique, Lesotho, Madagascar and DRC. However, only South Africa allows for same sex marriages and civil unions.

 

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Ghana’s Affirmative Action a reality or a mere rhetoric
August 21, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Ahedor Jessica

Co- Convener, for the CSO Cluster on Decentralization and Citizens’ Participation, Efua Edith Chidi

Co- Convener, for the CSO Cluster on Decentralization and Citizens’ Participation, Efua Edith Chidi

 

The CSOs Cluster on Decentralization and Citizens Participation, a body of 62 active CSOs in Ghana and other interest groups, has officially out doored a campaign aimed at calling on the Ghanaian government to fast-track the laying of the Affirmative Action bill towards its passage by its current Parliament. Affirmative Action is a set of temporary measures targeted at protected groups in order to enable or encourage members of those groups to overcome or minimize disadvantage to meet the different needs of the protected group.

In Ghana, Affirmative Action was needed to fill the gaps created by gender imbalances in the country’s political, economic and social spaces. Many stakeholders were engaged with public resources to map out the gaps and put together a draft for consideration and passage. 13 years down the line, this bill is yet to be a reality.

Ghana has committed to Affirmative Action by signing and endorsing the Convention on Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), Beijing Platform for Action, the SDGs and the Commonwealth Plan of Action on Gender Equality which set a minimum target of 30% of women in decision making position by 2015, the African Union (AU) Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa and AU Solemn Declaration on Gender Equality which targets 50% representation of men and women in public and political offices in Member States. Unfortunately, in the Ghanaian parliament, female representation is just 13.8%; only 23 women out of 124 ministers are representing just 18.55%; less than 10% women representation in all District Assemblies, this clearly demonstrated that despite the provisions under the constitution and the ratification of various international human rights laws, these laws can only be useful if an Affirmative Action Law is not passed and implemented to create an environment which is gender inclusive and gender responsive.

This, the co-convener of CSOs Cluster on Decentralization and Citizens Participation  Efua Edith Chidi argued that, since the Country’s independence, most plans for Women empowerment has become a mere rhetoric because the recognition of the role played by women activists during the struggle for independence, where 10 women were nominated and appointed to the legislature as part of the introduction of Representation of the People (Women Members) Bill in 1960 to establish consciousness for gender equality and women’s empowerment has been avoided by successive governments.

She cited countries such as Rwanda, Uganda, Malawi and Guinea Bissau who started the Affirmative Action journey later than Ghana, but had passed their bills and are implementing with impressive progress while Ghana marks time with even the laying of the bill in parliament.

In responding to this actions by the CSOs, the Department of Gender under the Ministry of Gender Children and Social Protection has acknowledged the receipt of the written petition sent to the department seeking the update on the bill. The Director of the Department Rev, Dr Comfort Asare in a two page document wrote back to the group stating chronologically efforts made by government from 2011 to 2018 stating that bill is currently with the Ministry for some comments, after it went through series of scrutiny at the Attorney General’s department.

Rev. Dr Asare says the next steps to be taken before the bill is passed includes the Resubmission of the bill to cabinet, Gazetting the bill, Tabling the bill before parliament and advocacy and sensitization on the bill. She however did not give any time frame of which the bill will be resubmitted for further actions talk less of when her Department will be done commenting on the bill.

Background

It will be recalled that, at the first United Nations Conference on Women in 1975,Ghana set up the National Council on Women and Development (NCWD) now known as the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection as the national machinery, to support government-wide efforts in empowering women through income generation, social mobilization and social development.

After the Beijing Conference in 1995, NCWD submitted a proposal for Affirmative Action and Gender mainstreaming to the Office of the President, to formulate guidelines for the promotion of Gender equality, rights and opportunities for women in Ghana. Eventually, the NCWD was placed within the Office of the President; with linkages to relevant MMDAs to enable it play an active role in facilitating cooperation between all agencies of government, Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Civil Society Organizations (CSOs). It set the pace for the establishment of an improved administrative framework for addressing women’s affairs by creating Gender Desk Officers (GDOs) in most MDAs. Their role was to ensure that gender concerns are incorporated into sector policies, plans and programmes of MDAs. Mainstreaming Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment into Ghana’s Development Efforts, in May, 2015.

But successive governments have paid lip services to the passage of the bill after numerous call from all fronts.

 

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Rise in Sea Levels: A dilemma of Ghana’s Antique community
August 21, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Jessica Ahedor*

File Picture.The fishing village of Totope is disappearing as the rising sea and worsening coastal erosion bury buildings in sand. The villagers say they were once three miles from the sea. Here women sweep sand towards the sea in a forlorn attempt to prevent their homes from being buried completely. Photograph: Nyani Quarmyne/Panos Pictures , culled from the Guardian

File Picture.The fishing village of Totope is disappearing as the rising sea and worsening coastal erosion bury buildings in sand. The villagers say they were once three miles from the sea. Here women sweep sand towards the sea in a forlorn attempt to prevent their homes from being buried completely.
Photograph: Nyani Quarmyne/Panos Pictures , culled from the Guardian

Ghana, like it peers along the Gulf of Guinea is among countries in the western part of Africa. Like Togo, Benin and Nigeria, has been experiencing severe sea erosion problems at various points along – her 580 kilometer coastline. The most severe and internationally known areas are located in the Volta estuary basin, at Keta, Ada and that of Shama.

Largely, the natural landscapes of Ghana’s coastline comprise a series of sandy beaches and also rock outcrops. Erosion of the beach material has occurred at places exposing the rocky substratum. Areas where the rocks are not hard enough experience considerable erosion. Changes in the ecological system, as a result of the coastal erosion, have produced effects which have gravely minimized the effectiveness of the fishing, tourist and other commercial activities according to the Publication of National black of Commence report on Sea Defense and Erosion Projects in Ghana.

The far-reaching erosion along beaches has resulted in the migration of most fishermen from the belt to inlands. As a result, fishing in Ghana currently at most places is faced with great disasters arising from the impact of sea level rise. These occurrences have impacted greatly on the economy of the communities whose livelihood is very much dependent on fishing.

The consequence of the environmental changes as a result of climate change is the frequent inundation of settlements onshore, leading to destruction of buildings and property and even human lives. A typical example in this July’s incidence at Anlo Beach a fishing and a settler community located at the estuary of the Pra River- the largest of the three principal rivers in Ghana. The Centre for Coastal Management, Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, University of Cape Coast in the Central Region, Ghana predicts after accessing the level of havoc racked by climate change says the community will be no more in the next 12 months due to the extreme sea rise level impact.  According to Professor John Blay, the leader of the research team and a retired Professor of Zoology with specialization in marine and aquaculture, University of Cape Coast, the community must be relocated to safer place for the security of the people and Government must erect a defence wall to protect the remaining land cover. ‘’ Climate impacts on coastal Ghana, is largely due to changes in the environment. I partially blame sand winning and other ecological destructive activities’’. He however warned other communities along the beaches of coastal Ghana to be wary of them.

The community, made up of fisher folks, used to be one of the preferred destinations for tourists in 90s in the region due to its large stretch of beautiful sandy beach with a natural environment. The settler fishing community north-west of Shama, the district capital is just 5 minutes away from the forth Sabastian, one of the forts used by the colonial master during slave trade era. The community of over 3,000 fisher folk has been heavily exposed to sea level rise, which had swallowed more than half of their asserts and continue to wreak havoc on them due to worsening climatic conditions coupled with uncontrolled human activities. The Annual phenomenon which usually happened in the country’s raining season saw this year’s impact as the worst in the history. In the past eight years Houses, fishing gears, economic trees and other personal belongings and properties including their working capitals are lost to the sea since the disaster normally happens in the night and early dawn. According some affected persons who spoke to Jessica Ahedor after this July incident, they acknowledged this year’s disaster is yet another worse one, they lost everything including their working capital. ‘’ I will say this year’s Disaster is the worst I couldn’t pick anything from my room I was so lucky I heard the sound from the building at the time it was collapsing so I quickly picked by twins and run out before it fell down’’. Rose Agbenyo narrates.

Many are of the view that a relocation strategy as the ultimate solution under the climate change adaptation and mitigation programme but that is yet to be a reality. The Chief Linguist to the Anlo Beach community chief, Kennedy Attipoe, says, “Relocation is key but there is the need for state intervention in the area of infrastructure which could be paid for by the people”.  Even though the Central Government for 2018 – 202 – Ministry of Finance Ghana.  Budget statement has earmarked some allocations for sea defence projects in the region that may not cover this community which has been hardly hit by tidal wave this year. According to the Assemblyman all efforts to reach authorities for a relation plan for the community has proven abortive.

*Freelance/ Broadcast Journalist, Ghana

 

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German Expertise is Behind West Africa’s First LNG Storage and Regasification Plant
August 20, 2019 | 0 Comments
Sebastian Wagner, founder at the Germany-Africa Business Forum (GABF)

Sebastian Wagner, founder at the Germany-Africa Business Forum (GABF)

The Akonikien plant will be receiving LNG and distribute it to various industries on the mainland, such as power and cement

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, August 20, 2019/ — German companies ESC Engineers and Noordtec worked closely with Equatoguinean contractor Elite Construcciones on the design, development and construction of the Akonikien LNG project in Equatorial Guinea. The 14,000 cubic metres storage and regasification plant was inaugurated this week by H.E. Gabriel Mbaga Obiang Lima, Minister of Mines and Hydrocarbons, and is the first such facility in West Africa.

The project is part of Equatorial Guinea’s LNG2AFRICA initiative that seeks to develop small-scale LNG projects to supply African gas to African countries and regions with limited infrastructure. The Akonikien plant will be receiving LNG and distribute it to various industries on the mainland, such as power and cement.

“German companies have once again demonstrated their ability to bring valuable technical expertise and technology to meet Africa’s growing and complex energy needs,” declared Sebastian Wagner, founder at the Germany-Africa Business Forum (GABF). “More importantly, this project was realized in cooperation with German SMEs, showing the increasing number of private German companies able to work in collaboration with African entities on key energy project. Germany has developed a strong expertise in gas, power and renewables, which have all become central to the African energy agenda.”

Last month and in order to support the growing energy cooperation between Germany and Africa, the GABF launched a multi-million Euro funding commitment to invest in German energy startups that focus on Africa. The funding commitment, which pledges funds to German startups with exposure to African energy projects, is the first such intra-regional initiative. It goes in line with Germany’s renewed focus on Africa, with the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) providing new stimulus to cooperation with the continent through the Marshall Plan with Africa.

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AFRICOM, Ghana Armed Forces Commence Africa Endeavor 2019
August 19, 2019 | 0 Comments
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Ministerial gathering to shape Africa’s health agenda opens in Brazzaville
August 19, 2019 | 0 Comments
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Angola’s Path Forward for Security and Economic Development: Weapons Management and Humanitarian Demining
August 19, 2019 | 0 Comments
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“I encourage you to go HOME”, American Comedian Steve Harvey says while commemorating Year of Return in Ghana
August 19, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Amos Fofung

In commemoration of 400 years since the first black slaves landed in Jamestown, Virginia, American comedian and actor, Steve Harvey, is in Ghana for the ‘Year of Return”, an initiative by the government of Ghana.

The famous comedian and host of The Steve Harvey Show, alongside his family, have visited some selected tourist sites including castles where slaves were kept as he embarked on the tour to expose himself and learn more about Ghanaian history and culture.

“It’s so wonderful to see our brothers and sisters from the African diaspora making the journey to the continent. He is in town with his family and taking in the sights and sounds of Ghana. He even got a brand-new outfit made by a local designer,” organizers of the “year of return” said on a social media post.

Launched last year in Washington, D.C., by Ghana’s President Nana Akufo-Addo, for Africans in the diaspora to visit the West African country as part of the commemoration 400th year since the first African slaves landed in Virginia, the initiative has gain commendation with several celebrities and Africans in across the globe make their way into Ghana to learn more about their root.

Steve Harvey and his family were welcomed to Ghana by the Minister of Tourism, Babara Oteng Gyasi and the Year of Return committee who met them at the W.E.B DuBois Center in Accra.

Steve’s family had an emotional day after visiting the Elmina Castle and Cape Coast Castle in Ghana.

“This was real pain I felt going back to Ghana’s slave castles…I could feel my ancestors on me… Powerful beyond words that I can explain. I encourage as many of you as possible to go HOME for your ancestors. Their strength is in each of us and we must honor their ultimate sacrifice in all that we do,” Steve wrote after visiting the Slave Castles.

Note that Steve Harvey is not the only American celebrity to visit Ghana in recent months. In December last year, actor Boris Kodjoe and some of his Hollywood friends and family including; Nicole Ari Parker, Diggy Simmons, Micheal Jai White, Anthony Anderson (of Blackish), Rosario Dawson, Jidenna, Cynthia Bailey, Bozoma Saint John spent a significant part of their month in Ghana.

Another Hollywood actor who came to Ghana was Samuel L. Jackson who had earlier traced his roots to Gabon. His adventures in the country included a documentary shoot and visits to local markets in Accra and fish markets in Cape Coast.

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Progress at Last for Kingdom of Eswatini’s Energy Mix Dream
August 19, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Koketso Lediga*

Maguga Dam, Eswatini

Maguga Dam, Eswatini

 

The request for qualification comes delayed given that Eswatini has publicized its intent to have a 46MW solar PV power plant online since 2017
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, August 19, 2019/ — By: Koketso Lediga, Managing Director & Lead Consultant, Infra-Afrika Advisory, Sandton

After a long wait, the Kingdom of Eswatini issued a request for the qualification and development of a 40MW solar PV plant to be developed via the First Tranche Procurement Programme and a 40MW biomass-to-energy plant to be developed via the Second Tranche Procurement Programme. Surprisingly, the announcement was made public through the Eswatini Energy Regulatory Authority (ESERA) and not the Eswatini Electricity Company on the 7thof June 2019. The later is a state-owned utility previously known as Swaziland Electricity Company (SEC) and currently operates a number of hydropower plants with an estimated installed capacity of 60MW to date. Needless to say, the generated power levels are inadequate since it provides a mere 10% to the Kingdom’s electricity demand.

The request for qualification comes delayed given that Eswatini has publicised its intent to have a 46MW solar PV power plant online since 2017. However, the decision is an important one for this developing country and it being it closer towards reducing the country’s reliance on imported power from utilities such as EDM (Electricidade de Moçambique) and EskomThis request could not have been issued at a better time taking into consideration the recent events in Mozambique and South Africa. The two utilities have an undisputed record that indicates their inability to provide steady or uninterrupted electricity for those within their borders.

Eswatini’s decision to act on its past commitment to invest in renewable energy and expand the ratio of renewables in the country’s electricity to 50% by no later than 2030 can only yield positive results for its population that amounts to roughly 1.42 million. It is beyond doubt that energy is the lifeblood of any economy as it is an input to practically every product or service produced across all sectors. Research has proven that there is a direct correlation between energy/electricity and economic growth. I would unashamedly argue that it is both the bloodline and backbone of a country and a thriving economy.

Given the long standing energy crisis in Eswatini, an unlimited natural resource such as solar is the most feasible backup to recover the lost economic opportunities for the country. Solar energy is available in abundance on a continent like Africa. It is still puzzling that most African countries have not exploited this resources. Even more so puzzling for a country like Eswatini that has more than one successful hydro power plan. ESERA has taken a wise move to embrace solar power as a strategy to hedge against unreliable and instable electricity supply and prices.

A further benefit of a diversified power generation approach means that Eswatini can rely less on imported power while creating more jobs for locals for the construction and operation of the plant. Basically, Eswatini’s decision will curb unemployment levels, improve productivity and improve the citizen’s standard of living and increase the economy’s GDP. The project is set to be consigned by 2020 and one would hope that the procurement process is not granted further deferment. Additionally, and imperatively, an appropriate procurement strategy and contracting method is used, which encourages collaboration and cooperation between ESERA, the successful bidder, subcontractors, funders, operator and all consultants to ensure that the project is not riddled with cost and time overruns.

Following the development and publication MNRE’s Energy Master Plan, the country should be more intentional in the future to encourage, support and implement public & private sector driven projects and increase local generation of renewable energy. While the project is an answer as well as solution for the country’s transient energy needs and the risk attached to the reliance on imported electricity, its long term strategy seeks to raise awareness for the evolution of home-grown renewable energy projects. Renewable energy will meet the country’s environmental clean energy goals which will reinforce economic growth. Since the current master plan expands over a period of 20 years, my hope is that the Eswatini government not only invites the private sector to contribute to the energy generation and distribution efforts but that it creates a conducive environment for participation.

*Managing Director & Lead Consultant, Infra-Afrika Advisory, Sandton

 

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Kenyans condemn unfair recruitment of census officers
August 16, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Samuel Ouma | @journalist_27

Bureau director Zachary Mwangi says that over 800,000 Kenyans had applied for 165,000 positions

Bureau director Zachary Mwangi says that over 800,000 Kenyans had applied for 165,000 positions

Kenya’s 2019 census is expected to begin on August 24 and Ends August 25 but there is fear that the process could be disrupted following complaints from the public that the hiring process was skewed by those who were in charge. Kenyans have read malice in the process which was overseen by the local chiefs.

People from various parts of the country have dismissed the criteria followed in selecting the officers. They have alleged that the selection process was marred with corruption, nepotism and impunity. The citizens argued that those who were in the position to raise the amount of money asked by the recruiters as a bribe and those related to them carried out the day.

There were also allegations that a number of people had started submitting their applications to local chiefs and their assistants before the jobs were advertised. Other claims are that in some areas outsiders were employed in courtesy of the locals and a number of state officials were recruited instead of the unemployed youths in many areas.

In the past few weeks Kenyans took it to the streets across the country protesting against the purported unfairness. They stormed the training centres demanding the exercise to be stopped until their grievances are addressed. Police have a difficult moment in containing the charged atmosphere. Yesterday police was forced to lob teargas at a group of youth who invaded a Nairobi training facility demonstrating against the ‘discriminatory’ hiring. In some areas locals had gone to court to seek an order barring the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics from conducting census in their regions until the fresh recruitment is done.

Nevertheless, the government has dismissed the claims that the process was not fair. Kenya National Bureau of Statistics has maintained that its agents carried out the process in accordance to the law and the qualified individuals met the set requirements. The Bureau director Zachary Mwangi said that over 800,000 Kenyans had applied for 165,000 positions and met the minimum requirements thus a number were left out. Mr. Mwangi’s statement seems to be far from the truth as the application process was concerned. The applicants hand delivered their applications at the Chiefs’ offices hence the source of his statistics is questionable since there was no recordings of data in those offices.

“We would like to reassure Kenyans that the recruitment was fair, transparent and above the board. The census committee who include local administrators ensured that those recruited were local residents,” said Mwangi.

 

 

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