Call Us Now: (240) 429 2177

country

Rwandans forced Third Term on me-President Kagame
July 3, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Maniraguha Ferdinand

Kagame speaks during a press conference ahead Liberation Day ceremony

Kagame speaks during a press conference ahead Liberation Day ceremony

President Paul Kagame of Rwanda said he did not want to run for a third turn before Rwandans begged him to do so.

He revealed this on Tuesday afternoon during a press conference ahead of Liberation Day ceremony which comes on 4th July.

In 2015 Rwanda hold a referendum which amended the Constitution, and  incumbent president was allowed to run for other terms beyond two.

As a Rwandese Patriotic Front flag bearer, Kagame won 2017 presidential elections with 98 %.

Opposition alleged him of amending the constitution to cling on power which he has held since 2000.

Speaking to local and international journalists, Kagame said it was against his will to run for another term.

“It’s an open secret that I didn’t want to continue. Even people in my party who I interacted with, my view was on one side and theirs on the other. I asked them to keep thinking differently and to bring the same argument next time.”

Kagame who led rebel group that ended a 1994 genocide against the Tutsis, went on saying  he is happy with the achievements the country is realizing under his leadership.

He said “I might be fitting into the accidental president context but while I am there, I have to do something. Before I became President I was a person who fought a real fight. Where I didn’t know whether I would  survive the next day”.

 

 

 

President Kagame stressed that  what brings him joy is  “to be alive. To be on an everyday struggle to make this country better. At first you sacrifice and then you enjoy the sacrifice. I enjoy this fight to make this country better.”

The Constitution that was amended in 2015 allows Kagame who turns 62 next October, to run for presidency until 2034.

0
Read More
Kenya:Collymore cremated at a Nairobi crematorium
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Samuel Ouma | @journalist_27

Bob Collymore, CEO of  Safaricom PLC

Bob Collymore, CEO of  Safaricom PLC

Ex-Safaricom CEO Bob Collymore’s body was cremated on Tuesday, July 2, in a private ceremony attended by family members and a few of his friends.

His body left a Nairobi Morgue in the morning and was taken to a crematorium where he was burnt at a temperature between 1, 000 and 2, 000 degree Celsius in the watch of his wife, children, mum, sister and a handful of family members.

The 61-year-old CEO succumbed to Acute Myeloid Leukemia yesterday, Monday, July 1 after battling the disease for almost two years.

The deceased was diagnosed with the cancer in October 2017 in the United Kingdom. He stayed in UK for nine months while receiving treatment before he resumed his duties last year July.

He continued seeking medication in various hospitals in the country until he departed according to the telco giant’s leadership. The dominant mobile operator in East and Central Africa fraternity expressed their sadness about his death and lauded his visionary leadership.

“It is a very sad day for us, it is not what we have been expecting but we have to accept the reality,” said Safaricom Board Chairman Nicholas Ng’ang’a.

“For nine years since he joined Safaricom, Bob has provided the company with visionary leadership and he was always passionate at whatever he did,” added Ng’ang’a.

President Uhuru Kenyatta led Kenyans in eulogizing the CEO. He said that Collymore’s outstanding corporate leadership will be missed in the country.

“It is with a deep sense of loss that I have received the sad news of the death of Safaricom CEO Robert William Collymore this morning. In the moment of great sorrow, my thoughts and prayers go out to his family, relatives, friends and the staff of Safaricom,” said the President.

The deceased was born in 1958 in Guyana. He lived with his grandmother until he was 16 when he relocated to UK to stay with His mother.

The businessman schooled at Selhurst High School in London and He worked with a number of companies around the in Japan, South Africa and United Kingdom before joining Safaricom in 2010.

He also served on a UN commission on life saving commodities for women and children, board of Acumen, Kenya Vision 2030 board, the United Nations Global Compact Board and a Founder Trustee in the Kenya’s National Road Safety.

He was a member of the B TEAM, a non-profit initiative established by a global group of business leaders to provide a better way of doing business, for the well-being of people and the whole world.

Meanwhile, Michael Joseph has been appointed as interim CEO until the right candidate is found.

Joseph is the current chairman of Kenya Airways and the former outfit’s CEO.

“Following the passing of the company’s CEO, at a special board meeting of the directors, the board resolved to appoint Michael Joseph, a board member of the company as the intericm CEO with immediate effect,” read the statement issued by Karthryne Maundu, the company’s secretary.

Collymore left behind a wife and four children.

 

 

 

0
Read More
Liquid Telecom connects South Sudan to “One Africa” broadband network and the world
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments
Dr. Ladu Wani Kenyi, Director General National Communication Authority, South Sudan addressing the journalists during the inauguration in Capital Juba

Dr. Ladu Wani Kenyi, Director General National Communication Authority, South Sudan addressing the journalists during the inauguration in Capital Juba

Transformative infrastructure will create a foundation for digital innovation and prosperity, while supporting the South Sudan Government’s positive economic growth forecast over the next decade

South Sudan, July 1, 2019 – Leading pan-African telecoms group Liquid Telecom will implement and operate South Sudan’s first fibre broadband network, connecting the country to the  “One Africa” broadband network, which is approaching 70,000km across 13 African countries and to the rest of the world. This breakthrough foreign direct investment by Liquid Telecom has been recognised by His Excellency Salva Kiir Mayardit, President of South Sudan. Ministers along with other national VIPs are joining senior executives from Liquid Telecom during a symbolic fibre digging inauguration on Monday 1 July.

With phase one due to be completed before the end of 2019, Liquid Telecom’s network will eventually make reliable and affordable internet connectivity available for nearly 13 million citizens of South Sudan, as well as thousands of businesses, government institutions and non-governmental organisations.  South Sudan will link to Liquid Telecom’s network across the region which covers the East African Community, a regional intergovernmental organisation of six partner states, the Republics of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, South Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania, and Republic of Uganda. The Community connects up to 300 million people and stimulates cross-border investment and trade.

This transformative infrastructure will ultimately create a foundation for digital growth, innovation and prosperity in this young country, while supporting the Government of South Sudan’s positive economic growth forecast over the next ten years.

“Liquid Telecom is immensely proud to bring fibre connectivity to South Sudan for the first time,” says Strive Masiyiwa, Executive Chairman of Econet Global and Liquid Telecom. “This modern ICT infrastructure will help address the most pressing challenges within South Sudan, including the urgent need for peace and state building, job creation and improved livelihoods. South Sudan’s 13 million citizens will be connected to 300 million people across the East African Community. Connecting South Sudan to the ‘One Africa’ broadband network will also champion pan-Africa trade and help build Africa’s digital future.”

His Excellency Salva Kiir Mayardit, President of South Sudan, commenting on this new partnership, says, “The implementation of this critical fibre infrastructure is a landmark step in the delivery of affordable communications access to the people of South Sudan, the business community, government and civil society. By connecting South Sudan to the global internet, this important infrastructure development will help improve social mobility, enable economic diversification and drive inclusive private sector-led growth and productive employment. The agreement is also ideally timed, coinciding with the signing of the Revitalised Agreement on the Resolution of Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan.”

The first phase of the agreement signed between the Government of South Sudan’s National Communication Authority and Liquid Telecom will include a 300km fibre backbone operating from the border of Uganda, through South Sudan, to Juba. Multiple metro clusters will also support the capital city. This first phase is scheduled to go live in the last quarter of 2019. The network will be expanded to other cities in subsequent phases, in time supporting the country’s 13 million citizens.

 About Liquid Telecom

Liquid Telecom is a leading communications solutions provider across 13 countries primarily in Eastern, Central and Southern Africa that serves mobile operators, carriers, enterprise, media and content companies and retail customers with high-speed, reliable connectivity, hosting and co-location and digital services. It has built Africa’s largest independent fibre network, approaching 70,000km, and operates state-of-the-art data centres in Johannesburg, Cape Town and Nairobi, with a combined potential 19,000 square metres of rack space and 80 MW of power. This is in addition to offering leading cloud-based services, such as Microsoft Office365 and Microsoft Azure across our fibre footprint. Through this combined offering Liquid Telecom is enhancing customers experience on their digital journey. www.liquidtelecom.com

0
Read More
Telecoming will exclusively distribute the digital contents of Real Madrid through mobile operators in Africa
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments
0
Read More
African Energy Chamber’s Investment Push in China is Met with Tremendous Success
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments
This 2-day roadshow is a demonstration of what the Chamber can accomplish for African governments and private stakeholders
BEIJING, China, July 2, 2019/ — The biggest names in the Chinese energy industry participated in the EG Ronda Licensing Round Roadshow in Beijing today, hosted by the African Energy Chamber (EnergyChamber.org/).

This is the first investment roadshow organized by the Chamber in China, as it pursues its strategy of channeling Africa’s global outreach to energy investors and stakeholders worldwide.

It has confirmed the appetite of Chinese companies for Africa, with the biggest public and private sector companies responding to the Chamber’s call to explore investment opportunities in Equatorial Guinea, including PowerChina, Sinohydro, Sinopec, Sinochem, Zhenhua Oil, CNOOC, CMEC, China Minmetals, Shenergy Group and CPP among others.

“This 2-day roadshow is a demonstration of what the Chamber can accomplish for African governments and private stakeholders. Our resources and reach have grown tremendously over the past few years and enabled us to position ourselves as a pillar of Africa’s global investment outreach. I am looking forward to seeing more deals being signed soon,” declared NJ Ayuk, Executive Chairman at the Chamber and CEO of the Centurion Law Group. “We thank the government of China, the Chinese energy sector for putting their trust and funding in the Chamber to organize this very successful roadshow, which is the first of many more we will be organizing in the future in China.”

The EG Ronda Licensing Round Roadshow 2019 in Beijing is notably showcasing the 27 oil & gas blocks on offer under the country’s 2019 oil & gas licensing round, and is promoting the high-potential that Equatorial Guinea has in minerals such as gold, diamonds, base metals, bauxite and iron ore. The winners will be announced during the upcoming GECF’s 5th Gas Forum in Malabo on November 27th, 2019.

“The pro-activeness of the Ministry of Mines and Hydrocarbons to reach out to global investors is a winning strategy that should be followed by many others amidst such competitive market conditions. The Chamber will always be ready to support African governments and companies seeking to attract investors and build successful industries at home that promote local content, job creation and prosperity,” said Mickael Vogel, Director of Strategy at the Chamber. “The Chamber’s future roadshows will be taking us back to Beijing but also to global energy centers such as Singapore, Moscow, Dubai, London and Houston. Africa is the last true global energy frontier and the time to engage with investors is now.”

0
Read More
Equatorial Guinea Presents Open Oil, Gas and Mining Licenses in Successful Roadshow in China
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments
0
Read More
Centurion CEO speaks to Chinese Oil and Gas Investors on African opportunities
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments
Led by CEO Nj Ayuk, the team is meeting with several high-profile Chinese executives and energy companies seeking to invest in sub-Saharan Africa
Centurion CEO NJ Ayuk

Centurion CEO NJ Ayuk

BEIJING, China, July 2, 2019/ — A team of attorneys from Centurion (https://CenturionLG.com) is in China this week to participate in the EG Ronda Licensing Roadshow being held today and tomorrow at the Kempinski Hotel Beijing. Led by CEO Nj Ayuk, the team is meeting with several high-profile Chinese executives and energy companies seeking to invest in sub-Saharan Africa.

The roadshow is organized by the African Energy Chamber on behalf of Equatorial Guinea’s Ministry of Mines and Hydrocarbons. With the biggest names amongst the Chinese energy companies attending, including companies such as CNPC, PowerChina Group, Sinopec, Sinochem, CNOOC, Shenergy, CMEC and China Minmetals Corp, Centurion has had the opportunity to discuss considerable deals in several African oil markets.

“Centurion’s presence in China for the EG Ronda Roadshow is a mark of our commitment not only to Equatorial Guinea, but to the promotion of Chinese investments across Africa,” declared Nj Ayuk from Beijing. “China is serious about investing in Africa, and Chinese investors and companies are looking for reliable African legal advisors and partners to efficiently do business in our continent. This represents billions of dollars of investment ready to support the development of the African oil industry.”

Centurion has always been at the forefront of channeling foreign investments into Africa’s oil & gas value chains. The firm has advised on the most recent PSCs being signed in the continent and continues to be part of landmark deals and projects in West and Eastern Africa. The firm has a specific desk dedicated to Chinese companies and investors, and has been increasingly working in diversifying the flow of investments coming into Africa’s extractive industries, working with new partners from Russia, Turkey and the Middle East.

0
Read More
Revisiting ‘democracy and dictatorship’
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Edwin Madunagu

Let us begin by quickly recalling two bits of Nigeria’s recent history. First, at the close of 1983, a military junta overthrew and supplanted the elected civilian government of Shehu Shagari, the first and only president of Nigeria’s Second Republic (1979-1983). Then, early in 1985, in the second year of the new military regime, which was headed by Major-General Muhammadu Buhari, an animated debate, similar to the one the country is now witnessing, raged in Nigeria’s national newspapers. The debate then was the relationship between democracy and dictatorship, or—as Leftists would more elegantly describe it—the “dialectics of democracy and dictatorship”. Thirty-three years later, with the global triumph of “democracy”, the question has transformed to the relationship between “national security” and “the rule of law” under “democracy”!

Incidentally, I joined The Guardian newspaper as a resident, full-time member of the Editorial Board when the 1985 debate was raging. And I joined the debate as a newly-inaugurated member of the Board and columnist. The present piece may be read either as an entirely fresh article provoked by the current debate over a recent statement by Nigeria’s current democratically–elected civilian President, Muhammadu Buhari, or as a review/update of my article, “Democracy and dictatorship”, published by The Guardian on Thursday, May 16, 1985. The 1985 article was provoked by the government of the same personage, Muhammadu Buhari, then Nigeria’s unelected military Head of State.

The broadest presentation of the central question in the 1985 debate was whether Nigeria, under military rule, was a democracy or not. It was as simple and straightforward as that—or as I saw it then, in 1985. A second question attached to the first, or issuing from it, was what should be done, if the regime was not a democracy. Leftists are often more interested in this type of follow-up questions. In any case, many participants in the 1985 debate agreed that Nigerians should struggle to return the country to democratic rule, perhaps a better form of democracy than the Second Republic. Many others argued for a revolution—perhaps a socialist one—to re-define democracy. However, my attitude then was that a comprehensive answer to the first question carried the essential elements of the answer to the second.

Back to the central question of whether Nigeria was a democracy—a question that was, in essence, neither legal nor technical, but political. One answer was that Nigeria was not a democracy and should, in fact, not pretend to be one. Another opinion was that although Nigeria was not a democracy, there were certain democratic rights of the Nigerian people that ought to survive any change of government—“rights that are, more or less, conquests of humanity as a whole, rights that are incorporated in the United Nations’ Declaration on Human Rights to which Nigeria is a signatory”. That was how I put it in my May 1985 article: “Democracy and dictatorship”. Of course, there were other positions—some illuminating the questions, others confusing them. But I settled for the two described above as the main, dominant ones.

My substantive answer to this central question was in two parts. The first part was that Nigeria under the military rule of General Buhari and Brigadier Idiagbon was not a democracy, and that the Shehu Shagari civilian regime which it overthrew and supplanted was also not a democracy. The second part was that under class rule, democracy and dictatorship are not “polar opposites” but “dialectical opposites”; that “democracy” and “dictatorship” are polar opposites only in their “pure forms”; and that “democracy” in its pure form is realizable only in a distant regime projected by Marxists and some other strata of Leftists. By this composite proposition I meant that in actually-existing political class regimes, the best democracies contain significant dictatorial elements while even the worst dictatorships usually claim, or are portrayed, to be influenced by some known democratic principles and antecedents. Today, what I would add to this 1985 “disquisition” is that we can differentiate between regimes and social orders advancing to democracy and those that are not.

About five years after this debate and the appearance of my article “Democracy and dictatorship”, I received a copy of the August 1990 issue of a Moscow-published magazine called “New Times”. Pages (40-43) of the issue carried an article titled “Dictatorship and democracy” written in prison in 1918 by Rosa Luxemburg, a leading Marxist political economist and revolutionary of Polish-German nationality. She was the de-facto co-founder of what became the Communist Party of Germany: “de-facto” because she was murdered in prison in 1919 by rising German fascists before the party was formally proclaimed. The article was extracted from a larger article by Luxemburg titled “The Russian Revolution”, a long review of the 1917 Russian Revolution. Being incarcerated, she based her review on what she saw and knew before her incarceration and reports smuggled to her in prison.

I was pleased to see Rosa Luxemburg’s 1918 article five years after I wrote mine. But I noted then, in 1990—and more strongly now, in 2018—that the difference between Luxemburg’s title, “Dictatorship and democracy” and mine, “Democracy and dictatorship” goes beyond the arrangement of the two key words. Each arrangement indicates where the author concerned was focusing in the dialectics.

My reading of what Luxemburg was saying in her review was that the Russian revolution ought to be more democratic— notwithstanding the need and the fact, both upheld by her, that it was a form of the “dictatorship of the proletariat” which was conceived as a transition to socialism, to socialist democracy. The best that capitalism had been able to offer the world, she insisted, was bourgeois democracy. This bourgeois democracy was however, in essence, bourgeois dictatorship, the dictatorship of the capitalist ruling class.

Proletarian democracy should not be a mere “inversion” of bourgeois democracy—or else it would not transit to socialist democracy. Proletarian democracy should “proceed at every step from the active participation of the masses; it should be under their direct influence; it should submit to control by the people and it should rest on the growing political knowledge of the masses.”

Rosa Luxemburg’s review of the Russian Revolution was both critical and sympathetic. In addition to what I have already said, the following direct quotes from her “Dictatorship and democracy” further illustrate her provisional assessment—which unfortunately became the last one: “Any sustained rule by a state of siege leads to arbitrary rule; and any arbitrary rule leads to corruption”; “Without free press, without unfettered unions and freedom of assembly genuine rule by the people is unthinkable”; “The public life of a state with limited freedom is poor, meagre, schematic and sterile because by excluding democracy it shuts off its own sources of spiritual wealth and progress”; “Freedom for the government supporters is not freedom. Freedom is always for dissenters”.

Then, Rosa Luxemburg’s warning: “Unless the entire mass of people is engaged, socialism will be introduced by a score of intellectuals sitting round a green table. Control by the people is absolutely necessary, otherwise experience will be shared only within a close circle of officials of the new government, and corruption will be inevitable.”

But Rosa Luxemburg’s article ended on a note of praise, support and optimism: “At this stage, on the eve of decisive battles throughout the world …. Lenin and Trotsky and their friends were the first to march ahead of the world proletariat and show it an example. This is the most essential—and permanent—feature of Bolshevism. They have ventured out in the forefront of the international proletariat and given the struggle between capital and labour all over the world a mighty push forward. In Russia, the problem could only be raised but not solved, because it can only be solved internationally.”

Madunagu, mathematician and journalist, writes from Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria.

 

0
Read More
One Sight Commits to address vision problems in Gambia
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Adama Makasuba

One Sight- a United States based Organization has assured its commitment to addressing vision problem globally.

The Organization has now expanded its centre to the seven administrative regions of the country, aim to supporting Gambians to access vision care at affordable cost.

Speaking during a press conference at the Serrekunda General Hospital on Friday, President and Executive Director of the Organization-T OVERBEY said there are currently 1.1 billion people around the globe who need eye glasses but that they don’t have access to them.

According to her, this problem is either they don’t have access to right medical care or they can’t afford the glasses they need.

“We call this vision gab and One Sight is dedicated to closing it,” she said.

She said in order to address vision problem that there is need for permanent solutions like sustainable vision, adding they are able to pilot the module first in the Gambia.

“And because of this pilot, we are able to learn how to make this module successfully partner effectively and how to build in order to ensure a long lasting solution to vision care in a country that we serve,” she added.

She assured that One Sight ‘would is credibly proud of being part of the journey to ensure that all Gambians have access to high quality and affordable vision care.’

For his part, Dr Abba Hydara expressed with delight about One Sight partnership with Shiekh Zayyid eye care, saying “it has empowered to maintain the leadership of eye care in the Gambia.”

Meanwhile, One Sight has opened its vision centers in 130 countries across the World and said it hope to be able to provide access of eye glasses to over 38 million people around the world.

 

 

 

0
Read More
Burundi : Nkurunziza renames countries’ biggest infrastructure before his term ends
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Maniraguha Ferdinand

President Pierre Nkurunziza

President Pierre Nkurunziza

President of Burundi, Pierre Nkurunziza has renamed the  countries’ biggest infrastructures as a gift to those who fought for independence.

On 1st  July 2019 Burundi celebrates 57th independance acquired from Belgium in 1962.

During his speech on the eve of the  independance, President Nkurunziza revealed  new names of Burundi’s biggest infrastructure including national airport.

Among renamed infrastructure includes Bujumbura International Airport which is now Merchior Ndadaye International Airport, Prince Louis Rwagasore Stadium renamed Heroes Stadium.

Prince Louis Rwagasore who brought Burundi to independance also was honoured by renaming low house palace after him.

A route in Bujumbura was dedicated to Lt. Gén. Adolphe Nshimirimana, a senior military figure loyal to Nkurunziza who was shot dead  in 2015.

President Nkurunziza also suspends  compulusory contributions  to next year’s general elections.

He said that they have already collected sufficient amount of money required to have credible elections.

However, Nkurunziza urged those who wish to go on contributing.

By the end of 2017, government of Burundi urged people to partcipate into contributions aimed at raising sufficient budget to fund  2020 general elections.

President Nkurunziza announced he will not run for another term after the one he is serving which ends next year.

Amidst an opposition boycott, Nkurunziza was re-elected for a third term in the July 2015 presidential election which was marred by violence., and thousands of people fled the country.

0
Read More
Gambia: Yankuba Touray Charged with ‘Murder’
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Bakary Ceesay

Retired Captain Yankuba Touray, a former minister and member of the defunct

Retired Captain Yankuba Touray, a former minister and member of the defunct

Retired Captain Yankuba Touray, a former minister and member of the defunct Armed Forces Provisional Ruling Council (AFPRC) has been arraigned and charged with ‘Murder’ of Ousman Koro Ceesay at The High Court in Banjul on Monday.

He is yet to take his plea on the allegations and he is remained at Mille II State Central Prison.

  Case continues on 8th July, 2019

Last week Touary, refused to testify, before Truth Reconciliation and Reparations Commission (TRRC) citing a Constitutional immunity on him, the Commission ordered his arrest. The lead counsel of the Commission Essa Faal said Touray’s claim immunity does not exist.

Statement of offence: Murder contrary to Section 187 of the Criminal Code Cap 10 Volume 3 Laws of the Gambia 2009.

Particular of offence alleged Touray  that sometime in the month of June 19995 at Kololi in the West Coast Region of The Gambia within the jurisdiction of the honorable court with malice and aforethought caused the death of one Ousman Koro Ceesay by beating him with a pestle- like object and other dangerous weapons thereby committed an offence.

0
Read More
Gambia At Risk of Returning to Dictatorship-Darboe
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments

By Bakary Ceesay

Ousainou Darboe, leader of United Democratic Party

Ousainou Darboe, leader of United Democratic Party

 Ousainou Darboe, leader of United Democratic Party, (UDP) has there is enough warning signs to suggest that The Gambia is at risk of returning tyrannical rule.

 “This is our country. We cannot afford another dictatorship. It should be the duty of every patriotic citizen to fight tyranny in any form,” Darboe, former vice President told a political rally on Saturday in Wellingara.

 The veteran lawyer cum politician pointed out that ex- President Yahya   Jammeh administration and that of Barrow’s rule,  there is not much difference between the two administrations-adding that Executive Orders are still being directed to target government workers suspected to be sympathetic to the opposition.

 He frowns at workers that are being fired under the directives of the President Adama Barrow

“This was not what we fought for. We do not fought Yahya Jammeh because he is from Foni. We do not fought Jammeh because he is a Jolla. We fought Yahya Jammeh based on principles. One of our main outcries during Jammeh’s rule was the abuse of Executive Orders. Here we are witnessing a similar trend happening in the new Gambia,” Darboe, whose was jailed by ex- President for standing by Gambia reechoed.

He advised Gambians to stand up to stop what he calls “the looming tyranny” developing in the country.

He noted that: “TRRC “Never Again” slogan will land in the dustbin of history, if Gambians do not stand up to be counted to stop what he calls “the looming tyranny” developing in the country”

Darboe, also former foreign affairs minister added that:  “I heard them asking as to whether I want to go back to jail; well if defending and standing up for my country means going to jail, then I am ready to die for The Gambia,”

0
Read More
1 192 193 194 195 196 337