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The 3rd Women In Africa (WIA) Initiative annual World Summit DEFINED HOW AFRICAN BUSINESS WOMEN CAN TAKE THE LEAD
July 5, 2019 | 0 Comments

MARRAKESH, Morocco, July 05, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- At the 3rd Women in Africa Annual Summit held in Marrakech June 27th and 28th, 2019, the delegates coming from more than 80 countries agreed that African women need to take the leading role in defining how they want to develop business with the rest of the world.

“Together we are and we will change the centuries’ old story of Africa through the magic of women from all part of Africa, from Asia, the Middle East and America and from the few men who have understood that we are changing Africa for the greater good of all of us,” said Women in Africa President Hafsat Abiola.

The ‘greater good’ was symbolized by the exceptional presence of Alaa Salah, the 22-year-old Sudanese student, now known throughout the world as the Lady Liberty of Sudan after she spoke up in a demonstration demanding the installation of a democratic and civilian government in her country. As she did last April, she reminded the audience the poem she read, standing fearless on top of a car: “It is not the bullet that kills; What kills is the silence of people.”

The 550 women and men leaders, representing the economic, governmental, cultural and civil society from more than 80 countries never kept silent during the Women In Africa third annual summit and the parallel WIA54 program dedicated to laureate women entrepreneurs coming from every African country but one.

Placed under the High Patronage of his Majesty King Mohammed VI, the Women in Africa annual conference welcomed for the first-time official delegations from the United States, the Middle East and Asia. Together, they worked on the theme: “How African Women Engage the World and Create a New Paradigm.”

“If you get the right people together and get them engaged on subjects, great things happen,” said the Kuwaiti Princess Intisar Al Sabah who attended the conference along with a delegation from her home country. “From the opening speech, the whole subject was: ‘let us collaborate for a better Africa and a better world.’ This set everyone’s mood to engage and collaborate with one another.”

Three specific sessions addressed how Africa can revisit its business relationships with America, Asia, and Europe.

“We have to stop thinking ‘charity’ when we talk about women of Africa,” said Aude de Thuin founder of Women in Africa and of the Women’s Forum for the Economy & Society. “The only message is, ‘women in the economy are at the same level as men,’” de Thuin added.

If Africa has done a lot of work in terms of empowering its population to be able to scale up and create a wealthy continent, there remains a gap in how the rest of the world understands the kind of development Africa is going through.

The presence of Africa and of African women in the media around the world appeared to be one of the two key paths toward creating a new paradigm. As American television anchor and lawyer Star Jones explained, it is urgent that Africa, and especially African women write their own narrative. “In other words, you do not want to allow the news media to dictate how the world sees you,” Jones said. “You write your own narrative and you tell the world who you are.”

“Africa is capable of producing its own images and telling its own stories,” added Denise Epoté, Regional Director for TV5 in Africa.

The other path to a new paradigm is to take the lead of professional investment prospection in Asia, beyond India and China through a demanding process that includes transparency and positive social impact.

Acknowledging the growing diversity of African-Asian economic exchange, delegates agreed that Europeans need to revisit their own business relationships with African countries and corporations to remain competitive.

The new African paradigm was also implemented at Women in Africa by the 53 women entrepreneur laureates of WIA54 2019, an initiative launched by WIA Philanthropy Foundation and aimed at high-potential African women entrepreneurs who are creating tomorrow’s Africa. They all participated in a two-day series of training workshops to guide them on the fundamentals of a startup at the crucial moments of its development.

“Africa is the only region in the world where more women than men choose an entrepreneurial career, a reality that underscores the work of Women in Africa Philanthropy, which we are proud to sponsor for the second consecutive year,” said Société Générale CEO Frédéric Oudéa in closing of the summit. “Opening a field of possibilities to the feminine dynamic will have a certain impact on the future of the African continent.”

“The 53 Women Entrepreneurs represent every country of Africa but Eritrea,” explained its program manager Seynabou Thiam. “They were selected among 1,800 applicants, which confirms the force of women entrepreneurship in Africa,” Thiam explained.

“These young women entrepreneurs represent the future of not only their countries but the future of Africa and the world,” said WIA54 Godmother Ann Walker Marchant, founder of The Walker Marchant Group in Washington D.C. and a former White House Special Assistant to President Bill Clinton. “They are innovative, creative and fierce. They are breaking glass ceilings and changing the perception of business in Africa. These fresh faces are the future.”

Seven of the 53 WIA54 2019 were also honored and their projects distinguished on seven different themes during a ceremony that started and concluded with a spontaneous enthusiastic and emotional party:

* Ley Zoussi (Republic of Congo) in agriculture for Complete Farmer and her community agriculture platform;

* Gladys Nelly Kimani (Kenya) on digital for Class Teacher Network and her application that digitizes the school path;

* Fadzayi Chiwandire (South Africa) in education for DIV:A Initiative, her NGO that teaches young girls how to code;

* Ehiaghe Aigiomawu (Nigeria) in fintech, for Vesicash and her instant escrow technology;

* Corine Maurice Ouattara (Ivory Coast) in health, for her Mousso Health Pass, the digital medical record on connected bracelets;

* Mariam Sherif (Egypt) in environment, for Reform Studio, her eco-friendly design products;

* Grace Camara (Sierra Leone) for social innovation, with RemitFund, which transforms the African diaspora funds’ transfers into social investments.

Roland Berger and Women In Africa published on this occasion their third study on African Women Entrepreneurs. Although Africa has more women entrepreneurs than any of the other continents (24% of women are entrepreneurs), African business women could make their startup companies more sustainable and profitable if access to professional training, support, telecommunications and banking structures were developed.

Other personalities such as Awa Ndiaye Seck (UN Women), Cathia Lawson Hall (Société Générale), Viviane Onano (Leading Light Initiative), Swaady Martin (Yswara), Alyse Nelson (President of Vital Voices), Rokia Traoré (singer-songwriter and cultural entrepreneur), Aïssata Diakité (Zabaan Holding), Francine Ntoumi, Oby Ezekwesili (#BringBackOurGirls) and Veronica Colondam (YCAB Foundation) participated in conversations that spanned from financial inclusion, women in science, arts & culture, the impact of climate change, development of women’s leadership, investing in the new generation of young digital innovators, facilitating women’s access to finance and agriculture markets, corruption and gender among others

Women in Africa also celebrated the African Man of the Year with the AMOYA 2019

AMOYA: African Man Of the Year Award
The AMOYA Award was presented this year to Younes El Mechrafi, Director General of the Moroccan Games and Sport (MDJS) and Vice-President Africa of the World Federation Federation for Company Sport.

“This award recognizes Younes El Mechrafi’s commitment to women’s sport through the MDJS,” said de Thuin.

Indeed, the MDJS supports and sponsors initiatives for the inclusion of women in sport:

* The association “Women, Achievements and Values”, chaired by Moroccan track and field champion Nezha Bidouane, organizes women’s races to mobilize and raise awareness on the importance of physical exercise.

* The Aicha des Gazelles rally

* Rabat Bike, for women’s cycling in Rabat

* TIBU Women’s Camp, which offers intensive basketball courses

* The Sahrawi women’s solidarity raid in Dakhla

African Agricultural Woman of the Year Award
“Women play a major role in agricultural production and product processing, and their role is essential in the development of food security,” explained Abiola.

In 2020, Women in Africa and Moroccan company OCP will present for the first time the African Agricultural Woman of the Year Award to recognize in Africa and beyond a woman leader in agriculture for her good practices and innovative solutions.

The work of Women in Africa has also been made possible thanks to an engaged network of 34 Ambassadors, and 22 of them traveled to Marrakesh this year from faraway places such as Djibouti and Colombia. For the two days preceding the summit, OCP hosted this group of committed senior women leaders at their Polytechnique University Mohammed VI of Benguérir for a series of brainstorming meetings led by Roland Berger. WIA Ambassadors devised new actions and projects to reach out to women leaders throughout the African continent including the works of WIA Agriculture, WIA Education, WIA Mentoring and local debates on culture and education, thus conceiving new directions for Women in Africa.

Closing the conference with a conversation with Alaa Salah, Abiola invited the activist-who studies architecture-to become the first young leader of Women in Africa, a program to be launched in 2020 and told her that she has now a group of women leaders who will cheer for her to become a politician, and perhaps not in the distant future, President of Sudan. The delegates of Women in Africa actually did not wait: they jumped on the stage, and one after the other, they all gave Salah a hug.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Women In Africa.

About Women In Africa
Women in Africa (WIA), founded by Aude de Thuin in 2016 and chaired by Hafsat Abiola, is an international platform dedicated to the economic development and support of leading and high potential African women. Through this initiative, WIA wishes to reveal the potential of African women and connect them at a continental and international level. The 3rd WIA Initiative Summit will be held in Marrakech on June 27-28, 2019 and will be under the high patronage of His Majesty King Mohammed VI.

www.wia-initiative.com – #WIASUMMIT – #WIAInitiative – #Womenempowerment – #WIAPhilanthropy #Projet54 | #WIAPhilantropy

Press Contact WIA
Sophie Touchot
+33 7 77 98 25 58
sophie.touchot@havas.com

Press Contact WIA Maroc
Dounia Z. Mseffer
+212 667 54 54 11
msefferdounia@gmail.com

Press Contact for North America
JC Agid
+19173498361
Jcagid@thirstyseveneast.com

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Boeing Pledges Support to Families, Communities Affected by Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 Accidents
July 4, 2019 | 0 Comments
CHICAGO, July 4th, 2019 -/African Media Agency (AMA)/- Ahead of Independence Day in the U.S., Boeing [NYSE: BA] announced $100 million in funds to address family and community needs of those affected by the tragic accidents of Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. These funds will support education, hardship and living expenses for impacted families, community programs, and economic development in impacted communities. Boeing will partner with local governments and non-profit organizations to address these needs. This initial investment will be made over multiple years.

“We at Boeing are sorry for the tragic loss of lives in both of these accidents and these lives lost will continue to weigh heavily on our hearts and on our minds for years to come. The families and loved ones of those on board have our deepest sympathies, and we hope this initial outreach can help bring them comfort,” said Dennis Muilenburg, Boeing chairman, president and CEO.

“We know every person who steps aboard one of our airplanes places their trust in us. We are focused on re-earning that trust and confidence from our customers and the flying public in the months ahead.”

Boeing will release additional information in the near future.

Consistent with Boeing’s regular process for employee charitable donations, company employees will also have the opportunity to make donations in support of the families and communities impacted by the accidents. Boeing will match these employee donations through December 31, 2019.


Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Boeing. 
 
Contacts

Members of the news media should direct queries to media@boeing.com.

For all other questions related to this announcement, please contact BoeingCommunitySupport@boeing.com.

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Libya: UN arms embargo violations put Tripoli’s 1.2 million civilians in grave danger
July 3, 2019 | 0 Comments

GENEVA, Switzerland, July 3, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- The lives and security of Tripoli’s 1.2 million civilians hang in the balance as warring parties use a range of sophisticated weapons imported into Libya in contravention of a UN arms embargo, Amnesty International said today as it released a new video marking three months since the battle began.

The escalating violence since 4 April has forced more than 100,000 civilians to flee from their homes and knocked out the electricity supply for long periods each day – impacting health care and other basic services in many parts of the city. Rocket and artillery strikes often hit civilian areas far from the frontline and frequently disrupt flights into Tripoli’s only functioning airport.

“The drastic impact of the battle for Tripoli is even visible from space, with satellite imagery showing large swathes of the city now cloaked in darkness. Meanwhile footage and photographic evidence we have gathered and verified from the ground show that civilian areas, homes and infrastructure are bearing the brunt of the damage,” said Magdalena Mughrabi, Deputy Middle East and North Africa Director at Amnesty International. 

“The UN arms embargo is meant to protect civilians in Libya. But Jordan, the United Arab Emirates and Turkey, among others, are blatantly flouting it by providing sophisticated armoured vehicles, drones, guided missiles and other weapons. The UN Security Council must urgently take steps to enforce the embargo, and the warring parties must respect international humanitarian law and stop recklessly endangering civilians.”

Background

Armed conflict in and around Tripoli escalated on 4 April 2019, when forces from the self-proclaimed Libyan National Army, led by General Khalifa Haftar, launched an offensive to capture the city from Libya’s internationally recognized Government of National Accord.

Since the offensive began, both through sources on the ground and analysis of verified video content and satellite imagery, Amnesty International has documented both sides violating international humanitarian law – including potential war crimes – with indiscriminate attacks on residential areas and attacks on migrant and refugee detention centres. 

The UN Security Council imposed a comprehensive arms embargo on arms supplies to and from Libya in February 2011 (Res 1970). Since June 2016 (Res 2292), the Security Council has authorized member states to inspect vessels on the high seas off Libya’s coast believed to be in violation of the arms embargo.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Amnesty International. 

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Egypt: Series of draconian laws ‘legalizes’ unprecedented repression six years since fall of Morsi
July 3, 2019 | 0 Comments

GENEVA, Switzerland, July 3, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- The Egyptian authorities are attempting to normalize human rights violations by passing a series of laws to “legalize” their escalating crackdown on freedom of expression, association and assembly, said Amnesty International, six years since recently deceased former President Mohamed Morsi was ousted from power on 3 July 2013.

The organization has today published a damning overview of human rights in Egypt since President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi’s ascent to power, which has been submitted to the UN Human Rights Council ahead of Egypt’s upcoming periodic review of its human rights record in November.

“Since President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi came to power, the human rights situation in Egypt has experienced a catastrophic and unprecedented deterioration. Through a series of draconian laws and repressive tactics by its security forces, President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi’s government has orchestrated a concerted campaign to bolster the state’s grip on power by further eroding judicial independence and imposing suffocating restrictions on the media, NGOs, trade unions, political parties, and independent groups and activists,” said Magdalena Mughrabi, Deputy Middle East and North Africa Director at Amnesty International.

Under his rule and under the guise of fighting terrorism, Egypt has witnessed thousands of arbitrary arrests including hundreds targeting peaceful critics and protesters, as well as continuing impunity for widespread human rights violations including torture and other ill-treatment, mass enforced disappearances, extrajudicial executions, and excessive use of force.

Since 2014, more than 1,891 death sentences have been handed down and at least 174 people executed, often following grossly unfair trials.

Of the 300 human rights recommendations made to Egypt by other states during its previous review at the UN Human Rights Council in 2014, Egypt accepted 237 and partially accepted a further 11. However, Amnesty International’s research indicates that in practice Egypt has failed to implement any reforms in line with these recommendations.

Legalizing repression

Egypt’s 2017 NGO law is a prime example of the draconian laws the Egyptian authorities have introduced to stifle freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly. The law grants the authorities the powers to deny registration to NGOs, curtails their activities and funding, and permits prosecution of staff for vaguely worded offences. Plans to amend the NGO law were announced in December 2018 but it remains unclear whether the proposed amendments would address human rights concerns. Since 2014, at least 31 NGO staff members have faced travel bans and the authorities have frozen the assets of 10 individuals and seven NGOs as part of an ongoing criminal investigation into the foreign funding of NGOs.

In 2018 Egyptian authorities approved new media and cybercrime laws which have further empowered them to censor print, online and broadcast media. According to the Association for Freedom of Thought and Expression, since May 2017, the authorities have blocked at least 513 websites, including news sites and websites of human rights organizations.

A series of legislative amendments signed by President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi in 2017 have also allowed the authorities to carry out mass arbitrary arrests, permit indefinite pre-trial detention and undermine the right to a fair trial.

Since 2013, thousands have been held in pre-trial detention for prolonged periods, sometimes for up to five years, often in inhuman and cruel conditions lacking adequate medical care and with little or no access to family visits. In some cases, police have even detained individuals for months after the courts had ordered their release.

Throughout the period, the Egyptian authorities have routinely relied on a colonial era law on assembly, adopted in 1914, and the draconian protest law of 2013 as well as and the 2015 counter-terrorism law to arbitrarily restrict freedom of expression, peaceful assembly and association.

During an intensified crackdown between December 2017 and January 2019, at least 158 people were arrested for peacefully criticizing the authorities, attending political gatherings or taking part in protests. More recently, in May and June 2019, the Egyptian authorities arrested at least 10 peaceful opponents, including a former member of parliament, opposition party leaders, journalists and activists.

Egypt’s Military Justice Code also continues, contrary to international standards, to allow trials of civilians before military courts, which lack independence and are inherently unfair. Hundreds have been sentenced to death after unfair mass trials. 

The authorities have also passed laws that have enhanced restrictions on independent trade unions and have bolstered impunity for senior members of the armed forces for crimes committed between 2013 and 2016, a period during which hundreds of protesters were unlawfully killed by security forces. 

Amendments to Egypt’s constitution adopted in 2019 weaken the rule of law, undermine the independence of the judiciary, expand military trials for civilians, further erode fair trial guarantees and enshrine impunity for members of the armed forces.

The constitutional amendments will also enable President al-Sisi to fully control the implementation of laws that “legalize” repression by granting him far-reaching powers to appoint senior judges and oversee judicial affairs.

“Under President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi’s rule, laws and the judicial system, which are meant to uphold the rule of law and protect people’s rights, have been transformed into tools of repression used to prosecute anyone who peacefully criticizes the authorities, while security forces routinely use torture to extract false confessions and obtain convictions in grossly unfair trials,” said Magdalena Mughrabi. 

“The international community must stop being silent witnesses to the Egyptian authorities’ decimation of civil society, crushing of all signs of dissent and jailing of peaceful critics and opponents who face torture, enforced disappearances and cruel and inhuman prison conditions. States, particularly those who made human rights recommendations to Egypt during its last UN review have a duty to speak out to stop this catastrophic human rights decline.”

Amnesty International is also calling on all states to take concrete action and suspend the transfer of policing equipment and surveillance technology being used by Egyptian authorities to repress peaceful opposition.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Amnesty International.

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DR Congo: UN food agency triples aid in strife-hit Ituri province
July 3, 2019 | 0 Comments

Food aid is being tripled for troubled Ituri province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), to respond to what the World Food Programme (WFP) has described as the world’s second largest hunger crisis in the world, after Yemen.

NEW YORK, United States of America, July 3, 2019-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- In addition to worsening hunger, communities in north-east DRC face a deadly Ebola outbreak and inter-ethnic clashes that claimed at least 117 lives between 10 and 13 June, according to a recent report by the UN human rights office, OHCHR.

Announcing the aid scale-up operation on Tuesday, WFP spokesperson Hervé Verhoosel warned that “people are dying of hunger, or, malnutrition is such that they are dying”.

He added that although there is no accurate data on the total number of deaths from hunger in Ituri, 13 million people are food insecure nationally, including five million acutely malnourished children.

The situation has worsened because of an increase in clashes between Hema herders and Lendu farmers that have driven people from their homes, along with rising food prices; a lack of income and access to a varied diet; and crop damage due to insects; and disease epidemics.

‘Senseless cruelty’

Addressing the rising violence, Mr. Verhoosel said: “This senseless cruelty comes right at harvest time, where the newly displaced have had to flee their homes in rural villages with very little or nothing”. He added that “many victims of this increase in violence are malnourished and have been forced to move numerous times…they are seeking security in urban centres and in the bush.”

According to the UN refugee agency, UNHCR, inter-ethnic violence has led to the mass displacement of 300,000 people since June, while some 7,500 people have crossed into neighbouring Uganda from DRC, across Lake Albert.

Together with North Kivu province, people in Ituri are also living through the DRC’s worst recorded Ebola virus outbreak, which WFP is helping to contain by providing assistance to people infected by the often fatal disease and their families and friends, in a bid to prevent at-risk populations from making unnecessary journeys.

In its latest Ebola update, the UN and authorities reported that since the outbreak began on 1 August 2018, 2,338 people have been infected with Ebola, including 2,244 confirmed and 94 probable cases.

A total of 1,571 people have died (1,477 confirmed and 94 probable) and 653 have recovered from the illness.

To help 5.2 million people across DRC for the next six months, the UN food agency said that it needs $155 million, including $35 million to respond directly to Ebola.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of the United Nations.

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Facilitating Agricultural Results, Modernization, and Educational Resources (FARMER) NOFO
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments

TUNIS, Tunisia, July 2, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- Assistance Unit and Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs Office of Assistance Coordination (NEA/AC) announce a Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) to support the development of the Tunisian agriculture sector, the Facilitating Agricultural Results, Modernization, and Educational Resources (FARMER). 

This NOFO aims to support the development of the Tunisian agriculture sector by providing technical assistance to the Agence de la Vulgarisation et de la Formation Agricoles  (AVFA) (Agricultural Training and Extension Agency) and modernizing vocational training centers around the country.  

The deadline to apply for this opportunity is July 31, 2019.  Contingent on the availability of funds, approximately $5,000,000 will be available to support one (1) award.  For more information, please visit the following link: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=317882

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of the US Embassy in Tunis.

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Prosper Africa – Initiative to Boost Trade and Investment Between the U.S. and Africa
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments

ABUJA, Nigeria, July 2, 2019 ,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- The new Prosper Africa initiative reflects the U.S. government’s belief that open and transparent economies should determine the future of African countries.  On his recent trip to Sudan, Ethiopia, Mozambique, and South Africa, U.S. Assistant Secretary for African Affairs, Tibor Nagy stressed that the US wants to be Africa’s trade and investment partner.

He explained that the initiative will focus on synchronizing the efforts of U.S. government agencies to facilitate more deals between U.S. and African businesses and to address trade and investment barriers.

“The US recognizes that Africa is a vibrant economy and critical trade partner, with six of the 10 fastest-growing economies in the world and more than 1-billion consumers. The continent is already playing a pivotal role in the global economy, with consumer purchasing power reaching $1.6 trillion in 2017,” Assistant Secretary Nagy stated.

Emphasizing that Prosper Africa is not a new development, but a strategic investment, Mr. Nagy said, the initiative will greatly benefit countries that support private sector ambition and innovation.

“Meanwhile, producers in African countries can see a US consumer market of more than 300-million people with a purchasing power of $13-trillion – the largest in the world,” Mr. Nagy said.

This initiative will also expand mutually beneficial trade and investment, increase the self-reliance of African economies, grow the middle class in African countries and improve business climates across the continent.  Prosper Africa will also actively support African companies’ efforts to trade and partner with US companies and invest in the US’s vast market.

The initiative will focus on three primary activities:

First, it will modernize and synchronize US government capabilities and efforts by providing a “one-stop shop” capability for two-way trade and investment with the African continent.

Second, it will facilitate transactions by coordinating US government agencies to help facilitate, expedite and mitigate the risk of transactions between American and African firms and investors.

And third, it will focus US agencies’ support to African partner governments, helping them identify and address policy, regulatory, capacity and logistical barriers to private sector trade and investment with the goal of fostering business climates that are mutually beneficial for the US and Africa.

You can read more details on Prosper Africa initiative.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of the U.S. Mission in Nigeria.

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“The staff at the clinic are very friendly. I am an old client so they all know me very well”
July 2, 2019 | 0 Comments

WINDHOEK, Namibia, July 2, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- Sometimes it is best to go where everyone does not know your name, but where you feel welcome just the same. It is that way for many sex workers and men who have sex with men (MSM) in Namibia, who bear the brunt of criticism, repulsion and stigmatism in almost all aspects of their daily lives.

As a result, these men and women shy away from accessing essential health services, such as HIV testing/treatment, prophylaxis (PrEP), condoms, lubricants and contraceptives.

According to the first ever integrated bio-behavioral surveillance study (IBBSS) 2014, among MSM in Namibia, HIV prevalence among MSM was estimated to be 10.2 per cent in Keetmanshoop, 7.1 per cent in Oshakati, 10.1 per cent in Swakopmund/Walvis Bay, and 20.9 per cent in Windhoek the capital city.

The estimated HIV prevalence estimated among MSM in Oshakati and Swakopmund/Walvis Bay approximated that of the general population of adult males in the surrounding Oshana and Erongo regions, as measured by the Namibia Demographic and Health Survey, 2013.

HIV prevalence among MSM in Keetmanshoop was slightly lower than that of the general population of adult males in Karas Region, while HIV prevalence among MSM in Windhoek was nearly twice as high as HIV prevalence among adult males of the general population in Khomas Region.

Non-judgemental care

In 2018, the Namibia Planned Parenthood Association (NAPPA) with support from United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Namibia convened several advocacy meetings with key partners aimed at establishing a drop in centre at the Out Right Namibia offices.

Out Right Namibia is a Namibian organisation working with the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) community aimed at advancing the rights, interests and expectations of the LGBTI community in Namibia. 

Both the drop in centre and NAPPA Okuryangava clinic had flexible working hours to allow key population to access sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and HIV services at their convenient times, it also involved opening the clinic on Saturdays to allow key population to access services without fear of stigma and discrimination. 

All service providers and staff at the drop in centre and clinic were trained and sensitised on the importance of quality, non-judgemental service provision to key population. The staff at Outright Namibia were also mobilised to build awareness and information about the services being provided at the drop in centre and clinic.

Pleasant experience

“I have had a very pleasant experience visiting NAPPA. As a sex worker, it is important that I feel comfortable and go to clinics where I’m free of judgement. NAPPA has opened their doors for me and I feel at home. There are no complications here as the services are free and I prefer this clinic over local hospitals,” said sex worker, Martha Keto (not her real name).

Keto, 30, has been a sex worker for almost 12 years and has been receiving PrEP treatment at the clinic since October 2017. ”I come regularly for my tests and for PrEP treatment which keeps me protected from contracting HIV. The testing I receive here not only keeps me updated on my HIV or STI status, but it keeps up with my overall health. I am informed about a lot of health information including my liver and the nurses are even able to tell if my alcohol consumption is too high,” she said.

“The staff at the clinic are very friendly. I am an old client so they all know me very well. I would recommend NAPPA services to my colleagues who are also workers. Their doors are always open for us, even during weekends we are able to come in if needed.  There is a large number of sex workers in Namibia and I hope the services provided by NAPPA could be exposed so that more sex workers will be informed of the free services that are offered here,” she said.

Keto’s sentiments are shared by Cinton Nati and Gideon Markus, (not their real names) who are both homosexual males receiving services at the NAPPA clinic.

“If it had not been for the friendly staff at the NAPPA clinic and their constant support and encouragement, I would have not visited the clinic as recommended by the nurse,” said Nati. He said this made it easy for him to develop a personal relationship with the clinic’s staff because they were very encouraging and as a result, he was able to see major improvements not only in his health but also his confidence.

Prior to visiting NAPPA, Nati experienced emotional and mental difficulties associated with being newly diagnosed with HIV. As a result, he would often miss his appointments as he found it difficult to accept the reality of being newly diagnosed with HIV.

“Since the very first time my partner and I went to the NAPPA clinics, both at Out Right Namibia and at Okuryangava, we have been treated very well and the staff have gone out of their way to make us feel safe. I have had counselling sessions to make sure that I am doing alright and also checkups to make sure the medication is not having any side effects on my body and that I remain healthy. The staff at the clinics have also regularly checked that we understand how to look after ourselves and that we practice sound sexual health guidelines,” said Markus.

“Each time we visited the clinic at Okuryangava, Sister Fungai Bhera (Senior Registered Nurse) would first make time to chat to us about how we have been.  This might sound like a small thing to others, but to me, it means the world as I know she cares about us and that I am taken care of and in safe hands,” said Van Den Berg.

He alluded: “LGBTI community in Namibia has never had proper support from our country’s leaders and as a result, there is still a lot of LGBTI people that get discriminated against and live in fear of their communities as we do not enjoy the same legal rights. Hence we live very secretive lives, sometimes even double lives. I think it is these secret lives that make it easy for LGBTI people in Namibia to land in situations where they are highly vulnerable to getting infected with HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.”

More KPs accessing services

In 2018, a total of 523 KPs were reached with sexual and reproductive health services at the two sites. This included 233 sex workers, 188 men who have sex with men 70 truck drivers and 32 women who have sex with women.  A total of ten outreach events were held targeting KPs at various hotspots in Windhoek.

The comprehensive service package provided at the two sites included: HIV testing and counselling, those who tested positive were immediately enrolled for treatment; PrEP services, those who tested negative were also counselled and informed about PrEP services and those who agreed were enrolled on PrEP; family planning services including condoms; sexually transmitted infections (STIs) screening and treatment; and information education related to SRH, HIV and gender-based violence.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of UNAIDS.

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Outstanding Young Hero From Cote d’Ivoire, Meganne Lorraine Ceday Boho, Receives Award In Memory Of Princess Diana
July 1, 2019 | 0 Comments

Young person from Côte d’Ivoire is honoured with The Diana Award for going above and beyond in their daily life to create and sustain positive change.

ABIDJAN, Cote d’Ivoire, July 1, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- MEGANNE LORRAINE CEDAY BOHO from Côte d’Ivoire has been recognised with the highest accolade a young person can achieve for social action or humanitarian efforts – The Diana Award. This year The Diana Award celebrates its 20th anniversary year.

Established in memory of Diana, Princess of Wales, the Award is given out by the charity of the same name and has the support of both her sons, The Duke of Cambridge and The Duke of Sussex.

Meganne Lorraine Ceday Boho

Meganne Lorraine Ceday Boho

Passionate about putting gender equality at the heart of economic development, Meganne started providing free coaching to people applying for fellowships. With her association SEPHIS, she set up “The SEPHIS National Tour for Women Empowerment”. In the last two years, they have raised more than $30,000, and trained more than 1,800 young women. She is dedicated to providing young women with the opportunities to further their career, for example, she gave free French classes to English speaking participants at a fellowship gathering 100 young people from West Africa. Through her position of Account Manager at African Media Agency (AMA), she has been able to work on big events like the Africa CEO Forum, The Next Einstein Forum and Africa 2018 Forum.

Tessy Ojo, CEO of The Diana Award, said: “We congratulate all our new International Diana Award Holders who are changemakers for their generation. We know by receiving this honour they will inspire more young people to get involved in their communities and begin their own journey as active citizens. For over twenty years, The Diana Award has valued and invested in young people encouraging them to continue to make positive change in their communities and lives of others.”

Commenting on Meganne’s award, Sefora Kodjo Kouassi, President of SEPHIS added “I am very proud of Meganne who constantly impresses us with her positive impact on the Association. This distinction is a testimony that Meganne is a truly inspiring model for her generation”.

“This Award is the recognition of Meganne’s dedicated work to women’s empowerment. We hope she will continue to inspire many young women in Africa to create a better future for generations to come”, commented Eloïne Barry, CEO of Africa Media Agency.

WHAT IS THE NOMINATION PROCESS?
Award Holders have been put forward by adults who know the young people in a professional capacity and recognised their efforts as a positive contribution to society. Through a rigorous nomination process, these nominators had to demonstrate the nominee’s impact in five key areas: Vision, Social Impact, Inspiring Others, Youth Leadership, and Service Journey.

There are 13 Diana Award Judging Panels representing each UK region or nation and a further two panels representing countries outside of the UK. Each panel consist of four judges; Two Diana Award Holders, an education or youth work professional, and a business or government representative. The panels have an important main purpose: to determine which nominations from each UK region/nation will receive The Diana Award.

Nominations are judged using the Criteria Guide and Scoring Guide which have been created to measure quality of youth social action.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA).

About The Diana Award
The Diana Award develops and inspires positive change in the lives of young people through three key programmes which include; a mentoring programme for young people at risk, a youth-led anti-bullying ambassadors campaign and a prestigious award which publicly recognises young people – The Diana Award.

Social media : Facebook, Twitter & Instagram

For interviews or further information please contact
Emma Pelling
07958 558172
emma@pellingpr.co.uk
www.diana-award.org.uk 

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DRC: Withdraw armed forces from Fungurume mines to avert bloodshed
July 1, 2019 | 0 Comments

GENEVA, Switzerland, July 1, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- Following reports that the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) army has deployed hundreds of soldiers to forcibly remove an estimated 10,000 artisanal miners from the Tenke Fungurume mines in Lualaba Province to the south of the country from 2 July, Amnesty International’s Deputy Regional Director for East Africa, the Horn and the Great Lakes, Sarah Jackson said:

Given the long history of excessive use of force by the Congolese army and its lack of appropriate training in managing public order, the DRC government must immediately withdraw its armed forces from the mines to avert unlawful killings. These artisanal miners are merely try to eke out a living and sending in the army against them would be completely irresponsible.”

Background on cobalt mining in DRC

Lualaba province is part of the former Katanga province in southern DRC and is the country’s most significant copper and cobalt mining area. The government estimates that 20% of the cobalt currently exported from the DRC comes from Katanga’s artisanal miners.

There are about 110,000 regular artisanal miners in the Katanga region, rising to about 150,000 on a seasonal basis. In the absence of authorised artisanal mining areas, many artisanal miners illegally enter private concessions.

Tenke Fungurume Mining Complex in DRC hosts one of the largest, highest-grade producing copper and cobalt mines in the world and is owned by China Molybdenum Co., Ltd., which is listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Amnesty International.

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BRAND AFRICA 100: AFRICA’S BEST BRANDS 2018/19 – UGANDA’S BEST BRANDS
June 28, 2019 | 0 Comments

* MUKWANO IS THE MOST ADMIRED MADE IN UGANDA BRAND
* CENTENARY BANK IS THE MOST ADMIRED FINANCIAL SERVICES BRAND MADE IN UGANDA
* NBS IS THE MOST ADMIRED MEDIA BRAND MADE IN UGANDA
* NTV IS THE MOST ADMIRED AFRICAN MEDIA BRAND IN UGANDA
* COCA COLA IS THE OVERALL MOST ADMIRED BRAND IN UGANDA
* NIKE IS THE MOST ADMIRED BRAND IN EAST AFRICA AND RETAINS ITS POSITION AS OVERALL MOST ADMIRED BRAND IN AFRICA
* NON AFRICAN BRANDS DOMINATE AFRICA AT 86% OF TOP 100 BRANDS IN AFRICA

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KAMPALA, Uganda, June 28, 2019 -/African Media Agency (AMA)/- Brand Africa in partnership with Brand Leadership, Geopoll and Kantar and Publics Africa today announced the results of the Most Admired Brands in Uganda. The list, the 7th annual Brand Africa 100: Africa’s Best Brands, is based on the comprehensive pan-Africa survey of the most admired brands among African consumers. In the Uganda and regional results, which are dominated by non-African brands, Coca Cola was recognized as the overall Most Admired Brand in Uganda. Mukwano leads as the Most Admired Brand Made in Uganda.

In recognizing the catalytic impact of media and financial services in Africa, Brand Africa has a separate prompted question in the survey to highlight the Most Admired Financial Services Brands and Most Admired Media Brands in Africa.
In the media sub-survey, where the pan-African list is dominated by Europe (40%), North America (20%) and Asia (20%) by global media brands with extensive pan-African reach, UK’s BBC, South Africa’s DSTV, USA’s CNN, Qatar’s Al Jazeera and France’s RFI lead the list of most admired media in Africa. In Uganda, NBS was recognised as the Most Admired Media Brand Made in Uganda with NTV recognised as the Most Admired African Media Brand in Uganda.

Where the pan-African media category albeit dominated by global brands, remains fragmented with numerous local and regional brands in all markets, the financial services category is relatively consolidated and African – with 64% of the Top 25 financial services brands, led by Togo’s Ecobank (#1), South Africa’s FNB (#2) and ABSA (#3) among the Top 10, are all made in Africa and pan-African. Uganda’s Centenary Bank was recognised as the Most Admired Financial Services Brand Made in Uganda. Safaricom’s Mpesa (#13), retained its pole position among mobile money brands with Orange Money (#18), MTN Mobile Money (#19) and Tigo (#23), underscores the impact of not only Mpesa as the catalyst, but mobile as a key enabler for financial access.

In a comparison of the most admired brands in Uganda versus East Africa region, while Nike is the leading brand in East Africa, Coke is the leading brand in Uganda. Eighty percent of the brands, all non-African – Coca Cola, Samsung, Airtel, Apple,Pepsi and Techno – are common between Uganda and the region.

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In a category analysis, Mukwano (Consumer Non-Cyclical), NBS (Media), Nile Breweries (Alcoholic Beverages), Centenary Bank (Financial Services) and Movit (Personal Care) are the leading Made in Uganda brands in a list that’s 42% African (Kenya) and 58% non-African.
Established in 2011, the Brand Africa rankings, developed by pan-African branding and reputation advisory firm, Brand Leadership Group supported by GeoPoll the world’s leading mobile surveying platform, and strategic analysis and insights by Kantar, the world’s leading data, insights and consulting company. The rankings are based on a comprehensive survey among a representative sample of respondents 18 years and older, conducted in 25 countries which collectively account for 80% of Africa’s population and 75% of the continent’s GDP.

In the main overall Brand Africa 100: Africa’s Best Brands list announced in May at the JSE in South Africa, while the top 100 is relatively stable, African brands faltered to an all-time low of 14% share of the Top 100 most admired brands in Africa. Over the past three years Africa’s share of the most admired brands has declined from a high of 25% in 2013/14 to lows of 16% in 2015/16, 16% in 2016/17 and 17% in 2017/18 respectively. In the Top 100, the US sports and fitness mega brand, Nike retained the overall #1 brand in Africa spontaneously recalled by consumers. The most admired African brands spontaneously recalled by Africans were South Africa’s leading pan-African telecoms brand, MTN, followed by Ethiopia’s Anbessa and Nigeria’s, Dangote. Where consumers were prompted to recall an African brand, Nigeria’s Dangote, was the most admired African brand, with South Africa’s MTN and Ethiopia’s Anbessa rounding out the Top 3.

In a geographical spread that covers brands from 25 countries in Africa, North America, Europe and Asian brands lead the list with 41%, 28%, and 17% respectively rounding up the continental spread of brands Africans admire.

“One of the biggest challenges facing Africa is transforming its vibrant entrepreneurial energy and environment to create competitive brands that meet the needs of its growing consumer market, says Thebe Ikalafeng, Founder and Chairman of Brand Africa and Brand Leadership. “More importantly, as is evident with Mukwano, Nile Breweries, and Movit, the leading made in Uganda brands, the next biggest challenge is retaining the ownership of these brands and ultimately the profits in Africa. These rankings are an important metric of and challenge for creating home-grown competitive African brands that will transform the African promise and change its narrative and image as a competitive continent.”
GeoPoll used their sophisticated mobile survey platform and its proprietary access to a database of over 250 million respondents in emerging markets around the globe to identify the most admired brands in Africa among a representative sample of African consumers.

“The scope of the Brand Africa study across such a diverse sample and geographic spread would be impossible to achieve using traditional research methodologies,” says Nicholas Becker, GeoPoll CEO. “Using GeoPoll’s mobile-based research platform and large panel of respondents, we were able to quickly gather more than 15,000 brand mentions from 25 countries in Africa, providing brands with valuable data that will inform their growth. GeoPoll was pleased to partner with Brand Africa once again to gather this vital research across Africa.”

Kantar analyzed the resultant 15 500+ brand mentions and 2 200+ individual brands and created a weighted scoring to produce the Top 100 brands.

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“The key to success for building sustainable brands, irrespective of origins or domicile, is to establish an emotional connection, creating intimacy and being more present in consumers everyday lives. This survey, a complex analysis of diverse data and countries to arrive at a representative ranking, is an important metric of the brands that play that are doing a better job and playing a vital role in Africa,” says Karin Du Chenne, Kantar, Chief Growth Officer Africa Middle East.

The Brand Africa 100 results are published in the June edition of the African Business Magazine now on sale globally and also available online to subscribers at www.africanbusinessmag.com and www.brandafrica. The results are distributed across Africa by African Media Agency (AMA) and media relations is handled by BWC I Burson Cohn & Wolfe is Brand Africa 100 globally.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Brand Africa 100.

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MEDIA ENQUIRIES
Joseph Kanyamunyu
Publics Africa
Cell +256757600100
Tel +256392001709
joseph.kasamunyu@publicsafrica.com

Charmaine Lodewyk
GM: PR and Events
Brand Leadership
(o) +27 11 463 5091
(m) +27 71 490 6559
charmaine@brandleadership.com
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BRAND AFRICA CONTACTS
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Brand Africa
www.brandafrica.org
Thebe Ikalafeng
Chairman, Brand Africa and Brand Leadership Group
+27 82 447 9130
Thebe@Brand.Africa

GeoPoll
www.geopoll.com
Roxana Elliott
Director of Marketing, GeoPoll
roxana@geopoll.com

Patricia Githua
VP Commercial Sales, Africa
+254 724 847198
patricia@geopoll.com

Kantar
www.kantar.com
Karin Du Chenne
Chief Growth Officer Africa Middle East
m +27 83 6314870
(o). +27 11 202 7000
e Karin.duchenne@kantar.com

African Business
www.icpublications.com
Omar Ben Yedder
Group Publisher and Managing Director
+44 774 704 6670
o.benyedder@icpublications.com

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BRAND AFRICA

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Brand Africa is an intergenerational movement to inspire a great Africa through promoting a positive image of Africa, celebrating its diversity and driving its competitiveness. It is a brand-led movement which recognizes that in the 21st century, brands are an asset and a vector of image, reputation and competitiveness of nations. Brand Africa seeks to inspire a brand-led African renaissance.

Brand Africa 100: Africa’s Best Brands is a Brand Africa initiative to survey, rank and recognize the best brands in Africa.

Brand Africa is an independent Non-Profit Organisation registered in the Republic of South Africa (NPC 2013/146300/08) and a signatory to the Independent Code of Governance for Non-Profit Organisations in Africa (www.governance.org.za).
www.brand.africa

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BA 100 PARTNERS

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Brand Leadership

Brand Leadership is a pan-African branding and integrated marketing communications partner for decision-makers and brand builders interested in and/or invested in Africa. Established in 2002, Brand Leadership has over the years delivered brand-led solutions that respond to African conditions, needs and ambitions for brands in diverse industries and markets in the private and public sector brands in Africa across www.brandleadership.com

GeoPoll

GeoPoll is a leader in providing fast, high quality market research from areas that are difficult to access using traditional methods. Working with clients including global brands, media houses, and international development groups, GeoPoll facilitates projects that measure ROI of TV advertisements, demonstrate demand for new products, and assess food security around the world. GeoPoll combines a robust mobile surveying platform that has the ability to conduct research via multiple modes with a database of over 250 million respondents in emerging markets around the globe. Strengths lie in GeoPoll’s ability to target extremely specific populations, deploy surveys in multiple countries, and provide expert guidance on how to collect accurate, reliable data through the mobile phone. www.geopoll.com

Kantar
Kantar is the world’s leading data, insights and consulting company. We understand more about how people think, feel, shop, share, vote and view than anyone else. Combining our expertise in human understanding with advanced technologies, Kantar’s 30,000 people help the world’s leading organisations succeed and grow. www.kantar.com

BCW
BCW (Burson Cohn & Wolfe), one of the world’s largest full-service global communications agencies, is in the business of moving people on behalf of clients. Founded by the merger of Burson-Marsteller and Cohn & Wolfe, BCW delivers digitally and data-driven creative content and integrated communications programs grounded in earned media and scaled across all channels for clients in the B2B, consumer, corporate, crisis management, CSR, healthcare, public affairs and technology sectors.

BCW Africa is the pre-eminent African public relations network. Through our network of partners in 52 African countries – 36 of them branded BCW – we offer an unequalled footprint and tailored for Africa approach tested over 25+ years, that combines local agency insight and connectivity with seamless project delivery driven out of our Africa hub office in Johannesburg, South Africa.

BCW is a part of WPP (NYSE: WPP), a creative transformation company. For more information, visit www.bcw-global.com.

African Business
African Business is the best-selling pan-African business magazine with an award-winning team widely respected for its editorial excellence. It provides the all-important tools enabling decision makers to maintain a critical edge in a continent that is changing the world. African Business special reports profile a wide range of sectors and industries including transport, energy, mining, construction, aviation and agriculture. www.africanbusinessmagazine.com

Publics Africa
Publics Africa Communications is Uganda’s leading Public Relations agency with a proven track record of a highly systemised approach to communications and is stress tested and successful for a host of national and global blue-chip clients. We have harnessed an understanding of the varying African Audiences in their African contexts thus enabling us communicate to them with Above, Through and Below the line (ALT,TTL and BTL) strategies that will not only better our clients bottom line but inevitably expound their brand footprint.
Publics Africa Communications is a pan African public relations and integrated communications agency. We specialize in Public Relations, Corporate identity, online reputation management, Social Media, Video production, Community management, internal communications, Reputation management, Media training, Events, Publications, Advertising, Media Relations, Crisis communications, and Stakeholder Engagement. Www.publicsafrica.com/About-Us

PR over Coffee AFRICA
The PR over Coffee is a leading PR community based forum,an information empowering forum created to promote and stimulate the growth of Uganda’s communication industry and our client’s brands through networking, collaboration, matchmaking and innovation in various professional fields using international conferences, publications and web community portals. Www.publicsafrica.com/Pr-Over-Coffee

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Madagascar villagers learn dangers of outdoor defecation
June 28, 2019 | 0 Comments

The discussion with villagers starts early in the morning. Volunteers are invited to draw a map of their village on the ground with chalk. One woman’s sketch shows 17 families – a total of 65 people – living in 11 red clay houses. She explains they share the three latrines that have been there for some time.

NEW YORK, United States of America, June 28, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- “The latrines in the village are not well maintained,” offered another participant, “so many of us go to the outskirts of the village to finish our business.”

The village is Andoharanovelona, 60 kilometers south of Antananarivo, the capital of Madagascar – one of the world’s poorest countries – where the UN estimates that some 11.3 million people defecate in the open.

The conversation in the village is led by a team of four sanitation practitioners working with a local non-governmental organization known as Miarintsoa.

Eugène Rasamoelina, the head of Miarintsoa, asks the participants how often the latrines are used and whether three latrines are enough for all 65 residents. At first, they are too shy to respond, mumbling that this is none of their concern. But Mr Rasamoelina persists and they reluctantly acknowledge that, in fact, they rarely use the latrines at all and instead defecate on the ground, a practice known as open defecation.

Careful to ensure the villagers are comfortable continuing the conversation, Mr Rasamoelina takes out a bag of sawdust and asks them to sprinkle its contents on a drawing of the village sketched into the dusty ground to indicate where they defecate. Eucalyptus trees and a pond at the outskirts of the village are soon covered with piles of wood particles, with a few piles placed inside the village, as well.

As they take a long, hard look at the sawdust piles, Eugène Rasamoelina raises the issue of flies and their role in oral-fecal transmission “Flies can transfer fecal material to the food and then to the mouth,” he explains, and a startling revelation comes over the village dwellers. “That’s why I was feeling sick,” said one, “I didn’t realize the danger to our children.”

In the “community triggering” approach employed by Eugène and his team, practitioners serve merely as facilitators. Their role is not to pressure community members to stop open defecation immediately but rather to give them the power to make well-informed decisions and to lead their own initiatives to  transform their villages.

“When we visit villages that practice open defecation, our main message is how human excrement can contaminate or pollute human beings,” he says. 

According to the World Bank, 77 per cent of the Malagasy population, some 24 million people, is estimated to live on less than US$1.90 a day, which places Madagascar among the poorest countries in the world. Open defecation is often related to poverty.

With the support of the Global Sanitation Fund, managed by the UN’s Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), community triggering is being used by 18 implementing partner organizations across Madagascar with the goal of eliminating open defecation.  As of December 2018, more than 17,000 villages have been declared open defecation free and 3.74 million people use improved latrines.

Villagers are recommended to clean up or transform open defecation sites into playgrounds or other public gathering places to stop the contamination and transmission of disease.

Any new latrines need to be fly-proof to prevent excrement being passed between people and animals and all people are encouraged to practice good hygiene by washing their hands after using a latrine.

WSSCC’s Sue Coates, says that stopping open defecation is not a final stop for the communities, but just the beginning of a series of life improvements.

“After working hard to make their own villages free from open defecation,” says Ms Coates, “communities become increasingly resilient and willing to continue sanitation improvements. And they’re better-positioned to tackle other issues such as menstrual hygiene management, health, nutrition and economic growth.”

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of the United Nations.

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Mauritania: Authorities must exercise restraint in policing protests and lift the internet shutdown
June 28, 2019 | 0 Comments

GENEVA, Switzerland, June 28, 2019,-/African Media African (AMA)/- The Mauritanian authorities must ensure respect for the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and exercise restraint when policing the protests planned for later today, amid signs of increasing repression in the country including an internet shutdown and arrests of opposition figures, Amnesty International said today.

“This afternoon’s protest is an important medium for the people of Mauritania to express their opinions about the human rights situation in the country following the presidential election,” said François Patuel, Amnesty International’s West Africa Researcher.

“The authorities must exercise restraint in dealing with the protesters, including ensuring their safety and opening up the internet space so that people can freely express themselves and share information.”

Presidential elections took place in Mauritania on 22 June and the internet was shutdown on the 23 June after the ruling party’s candidate, Mohamed Ould Ghazouani, declared he won the election. This constitutes a violation of the right to freedom of expression. It has prevented journalists, human rights defenders and opposition members from freely accessing and exchanging information and should be restored immediately.

In an apparent continuation of the post-election repression, a number of opposition figures have been arrested. These include Samba Thiam, the leader of the Forces progressistes pour le changement (Progressist forces for change); and Cheikhna Mohamed Lemine Cheikh, the campaign manager of the Coalition Sawab/Initiative de resurgence du mouvement abolitionniste (Initiative for the resurgence of the abolitionist movement) in the Ksar neighbourhood in Nouakchott. All of these individuals must be released or charged with a recognizable offence. 

“The authorities are justifying their heavy-handed repression by using tired rhetoric that blames foreign nationals from neighboring countries for the election-related protests. This is toxic and highly problematic in a country that is still battling entrenched racial discrimination,” said François Patuel.

“The Mauritanian authorities should immediately stop manipulating divisive and hateful tropes, and instead commit to respect, protecting, promoting and fulfilling everyone’s human rights, including those of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees.”

Background

Demonstrations by the opposition groups were scheduled to take place this afternoon in Mauritania to contest the results of the 22 June presidential election. However, the authorities banned the protest and several opposition figures called for it to be postponed. Due to the lack of efficient communication owing to the internet blackout, it is likely protests will still be held today.

The Minister of Interior, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, and high-ranking officials in the police force have made public statements blaming foreign nationals for the election-related protests.

On the eve of the elections, Amnesty International and 32 local other human rights organizations called on the presidential candidates to commit to protect and promote human rights, including combatting discriminatory practices and protecting the rights of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Amnesty International.

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Africa pledges to deliver Blue Economy at ABEF 2019
June 27, 2019 | 0 Comments
  • International and Pan-African organizations agree to collaborate on initiatives following successful ABEF2019

TUNIS, Tunisia, June 27th, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- The prospect of a fully sustainable Blue Economy for Africa gathered significant momentum following the second Africa Blue Economy Forum (ABEF2019) held in Tunis on 25-26 June.

Fishing, aquaculture, shipping, ports, energy and finance industries all came under the spotlight at ABEF2019, which drew in Government ministers, business leaders, international investors, academics and environmental organisations from across the globe.

 

From left to right - Henry Bonsu, Torsten Thiele, Angelique Pouponneau, James Maton, Marc Naidoo, Dr Frannie Leautier

From left to right – Henry Bonsu, Torsten Thiele, Angelique Pouponneau, James Maton, Marc Naidoo, Dr Frannie Leautier

 

The need for direct action to deliver the environmental, economic and social benefits for Africa, and particularly its coastal nations given 90 per cent of Africa’s trade is conducted by sea, was stressed during the two days of insight. Speakers at ABEF2019 agreed on the urgent need for better cooperation between the ocean stakeholders, better governance and law enforcement. Regional, national and local strategies are required to build a long-term plan and develop partnerships that are beyond short-term projects. Engaging with new technologies and innovative financing mechanisms are also key to shaping a sustainable Blue Economy in Africa. 

 

From left to right - Lazhar Bali, Ezzedine Kacem, Paul Holthus, Leila Ben Hassen

From left to right – Lazhar Bali, Ezzedine Kacem, Paul Holthus, Leila Ben Hassen

 

Leila Ben Hassen, ABEF founder and CEO of Blue Jay Communication, which organised the forum, said: “We can no longer just dip our toe in the water, we must dive in and be decisive in making and delivering change that will serve Africa for many years to come. It is no longer business as usual. Africa must have a sustainable Blue Business plan which will have a positive impact on the environment, on the economy and on society.” 
 
A sustainable Blue Business plan will accelerateAfrica’s transformation, create jobs, sustain livelihoods and empower communities, while offering impactful climate change measures. 
 
This was acknowledged at ABEF2019 across a range of panels with topics that explored how governments and private sectors can collaborate; tackling ocean pollution; innovative funding solutions; enhanced food security and sustainable growth for the fishing industry; sustainable ocean energy; how to engage more women to work in the maritime value chains and the opportunities to embrace the youth generation in the Blue Economy. 
 
Key outcomes from ABEF2019 saw the World Ocean Council, Tunisian Maritime Cluster and SETAP Tunisia signed a Memorandum of Understanding to create a platform to connect, share information, scientific research and technologies between the Mediterranean and the coastal African countries. In addition, WIMA Africa (Women in Maritime Association) launched the Tunisia Chapter with the objective of empowering women and reinforcing collaborations between Tunisian and African women in the maritime industry. 
 
From left to right- HE Samir Taieb, HE Elizabeth Naa Afoley Quaye, Leila Ben Hassen, HE Mokhtar Hammami

From left to right- HE Samir Taieb, HE Elizabeth Naa Afoley Quaye, Leila Ben Hassen, HE Mokhtar Hammami

 

The event attracted a significant number of high-level speakers, who can drive change and opinions, including government ministers HE Samir Taieb, Minister of Agriculture, Hydraulic Resources and Fisheries, Republic of Tunisia; HE Mokhtar Hammami, Minister of Environment, Republic of Tunisia; HE Elizabeth Naa Afoley Quaye, Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture, Republic of Ghana and HE Kwaku Ofori Asiamah, Minister of Transport, Republic of Ghana. 
 
Information on ABEF2019 can be found on website. Details of ABEF2020 will be released later this year.
Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA)on behalf of Blue Jay Communication.
 
About ABEF: 
The Africa Blue Economy Forum (ABEF) is an annual event organized by Blue Jay Communication. 
 
ABEF is thinking about accelerating Africa’s structural transformation and creating jobs for a young population on the rise. 
 
It provides a unique platform for ocean stakeholders to share insights on how to achieve SDG 14 and to present new investment opportunities in both traditional and emerging ocean industries, while making public-private partnerships and networking easier. 
 
#ABEF2019 
 
About Blue Jay Communication: 
Founded by publishing and media expert Leila Ben Hassen, Blue Jay Communication (BJC) is a global communications, branding, PR and events consultancy specializing in Africa. 
 
BJC’s mission is to enhance its customers’ brands, make connections and develop their business and investment opportunities. By doing so, its ambition is to contribute to job creation while reducing gender and sustainable growth in Africa. 
 
PRESS CONTACT: 
Selma Lakhoua 
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SAP and BMZ join forces to create more jobs in the digital sector in Africa
June 27, 2019 | 0 Comments

BERLIN, GERMANY, June 27, 2019 -/African Media Agency (AMA)/- German software company SAP and the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) plan to jointly create 450 jobs for highly qualified personnel in the IT sector in ten African countries. The collaboration, which was presented in Berlin today by German Development Minister Gerd Müller and by Michael Kleinemeier, member of the Executive Board of SAP SE and head of SAP Digital Business Services, targets unemployed university graduates. They will undergo a three-month training programme, followed by assistance to help them find jobs in local companies.

The programme will cover Algeria, Angola, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria and Tunisia. These countries have great potential for jobs and growth in the digital sector, but they lack well-trained specialists who can support companies and institutions as they introduce and operate software products. The project addresses this bottleneck. Its first phase will start this year in Egypt, Ethiopia, Morocco, Tunisia and Nigeria. As part of the overall programme, 600 unemployed university graduates will receive training and certification for jobs in the local IT sector, the aim being to place at least three out of four programme graduates into employment. This means that a minimum of 450 new jobs could be created which employers previously could not fill because applicants did not have the necessary skills.

(left to right): German Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller; Michael Kleinemeier (Member of the Executive Board of SAP SE and Head of SAP Digital Business Services); Marita Mitschein (Senior Vice President Digital Skills EMEA South & Managing Director SAP Training & Development Institute); Ellen Michel (Head of Programme, Development Partnerships - develoPPP for jobs Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH) "Africa's young people need opportunities for the future - and they urgently need jobs that are viable and that help close the digital divide and make headway on development. To that end, we have to seize the great opportunities offered by digital technology. That will only be possible by working together with the private sector. I thus greatly welcome our cooperation with SAP. We need more projects of this type in order to create lasting momentum for Africa's development, especially in the field of technology," said German Development Minister Gerd Müller.

(left to right): German Development Minister Dr. Gerd Müller; Michael Kleinemeier (Member of the Executive Board of SAP SE and Head of SAP Digital Business Services); Marita Mitschein (Senior Vice President Digital Skills EMEA South & Managing Director SAP Training & Development Institute); Ellen Michel (Head of Programme, Development Partnerships – develoPPP for jobs Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH)
“Africa’s young people need opportunities for the future – and they urgently need jobs that are viable and that help close the digital divide and make headway on development. To that end, we have to seize the great opportunities offered by digital technology. That will only be possible by working together with the private sector. I thus greatly welcome our cooperation with SAP. We need more projects of this type in order to create lasting momentum for Africa’s development, especially in the field of technology,” said German Development Minister Gerd Müller.

SAP Executive Board Member Michael Kleinemeier said, “Africa has the youngest population in the world. By 2050, its population will double, reaching more than 2.5 billion. Giving young people digital skills and IT training will create jobs and boost growth in Africa. SAP has been supporting Africa for several years through training and upskilling programmes in the digital sector, for instance the Young Professional Program and Africa Code Week. Our new collaboration with the BMZ provides additional opportunities for Africa’s young people and helps the continent to tap its enormous potential.”

The joint programme is planned to cover a period of three years. It emerged from the Strategic Partnership “Digital Africa”, a network uniting German development cooperation players and European companies. The BMZ supports the joint endeavour through its develoPPP for jobs programme, which fosters sustainable private sector initiatives in selected countries in Africa as part of the Special Initiative on Training and Job Creation.

The programme will be implemented by the SAP Training and Development Institute as part of SAP’s established Young Professional Program, which has already created more than 2,200 jobs for jobseekers with higher education degrees in 22 countries around the world.

For more information, visit www.bmz.de/digitalesafrika (in German), https://www.developpp.de/en/ and www.sap.com/mena/tdi

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of SAP Africa.

For more information, visit the SAP News Center. Follow SAP on Twitter at @sapnews, @SAPAfrica.

About SAP
As the cloud company powered by SAP HANA®, SAP is the market leader in enterprise application software, helping companies of all sizes and in all industries run at their best: 77% of the world’s transaction revenue touches an SAP® system. Our machine learning, Internet of Things (IoT), and advanced analytics technologies help turn customers’ businesses into intelligent enterprises. SAP helps give people and organizations deep business insight and fosters collaboration that helps them stay ahead of their competition. We simplify technology for companies so they can consume our software the way they want – without disruption. Our end-to-end suite of applications and services enables more than 425,000 business and public customers to operate profitably, adapt continuously, and make a difference. With a global network of customers, partners, employees, and thought leaders, SAP helps the world run better and improve people’s lives. For more information, visit www.sap.com.
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© 2019 SAP SE. All rights reserved.
SAP and other SAP products and services mentioned herein as well as their respective logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of SAP SE in Germany and other countries. Please see https://www.sap.com/copyright for additional trademark information and notices.

Note to editors:
To preview and download broadcast-standard stock footage and press photos digitally, please visit www.sap.com/photos. On this platform, you can find high resolution material for your media channels. To view video stories on diverse topics, visit www.sap-tv.com. From this site, you can embed videos into your own Web pages, share video via email links, and subscribe to RSS feeds from SAP TV.
For customers interested in learning more about SAP products:
South Africa: +27 11 235 6000

For more information, press only:
Adam Hunter, SAP Africa, +27 (711) 787 035, adam.hunter@sap.com

Delia Sieff, SAP Africa, +27 (11) 235 6000, delia.sieff@sap.com

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Eritrea: Government officials and supporters target critics abroad as repression stretches beyond borders
June 27, 2019 | 0 Comments

GENEVA, Switzerland, June 27, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- As Eritrea sits in the foremost human rights body, the UN Human Rights Council, government officials and supporters abroad are harassing and intimidating exiled human rights defenders (HRDs) and activists simply for criticizing the oppressive regime, shows a new Amnesty International briefing out today.

The briefing, Repression without borders found that HRDs are particularly at risk in Kenya, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, where Amnesty International documented attacks by Eritrean government officials and supporters on government critics, including an Eritrean Nobel Peace Prize nominee, Father Mussie Zerai, and former BBC Africa Editor Martin Plaut.

“For many HRDs, fleeing Eritrea has not provided them with much respite from the repression many people die trying to escape. They have to constantly look over their shoulders and watch every word they say, afraid of the long arm of the Eritrean government which evidently extends across borders,” said Joan Nyanyuki, Amnesty International’s Director for East Africa, the Horn and the Great Lakes.

Supporters of Eritrea’s ruling party and government officials use all manner of tactics to harass and intimidate critics of President Isaias Afwerki’s government and its human rights violations. These tactics include death threats, physical assault and spreading of lies.

The briefing, which examines the period from 2011 to May 2019, also highlights the authorities’ use of the militant youth wing of the ruling party to “fight the country’s enemies” in Europe and the USA.

In April this year, Eritrea’s Minister of Information Yemane Gebre Meskel, the ambassador to Japan, Estifanos Afeworki, and his counterpart in Kenya, Beyene Russom, took to Twitter and harassed, intimidated and disparaged organizers and participants of a conference in London on ‘Building Democracy in Eritrea’. In his tweet, Minister Gebre Meskel dismissed the organizers as “Eritrean quislings”.

“Such Twitter tirades by government officials clearly show the authorities’ intolerance of dissent and criticism by anyone anywhere, even at a time when the country is a member of the UN Human Rights Council,” said Joan Nyanyuki.

Militant party supporters

Supporters of Eritrea’s ruling People’s Front for Democracy and Justice (PFDJ), and notably its youth wing, the Young People’s Front for Democracy and Justice (YPFDJ), are at the forefront of these attacks on Eritrean human rights defenders and activists in Europe.

In deciding a defamation case in Amsterdam, a Dutch court in Feb 2016 ruled as follows:

“…YPFDJ receives instructions from the PFDJ, that the YPFDJ has (support of) the regime of Afwerki as its goal and that members of the YPFDJ are acting as informants for (the embassies of) the regime in Eritrea. The YPFDJ can thus, at this point, be called the extended arm of a dictatorial regime.”

Winta Yemane, born in Italy and eager to connect with her Eritrean roots, joined the youth wing while in high school, and participated in their 2011 annual conference held in Oslo, Norway. When she articulated her wishes for the country’s constitution, human rights and an independent judiciary, she quickly found herself on the wrong side of senior government officials in attendance.

“The officials said that I am a victim of misinformation by the western propaganda and enemies of Eritrea. They also said that my comments do not have weight because I am a minor. Three of the organizers even threatened to throw me out of the conference,” Winta told Amnesty International.

Upon returning home to Milan, she was stalked for a couple of weeks, received threatening phone calls from unknown numbers and was the victim of a smear campaign on social media.

Several other Eritreans living in the diaspora including Daniel Mekonnen, Director of the association of Eritrean lawyers in exile and Father Mussie Zerai, a Catholic priest nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2015 for his work with migrants, also said they found themselves on the wrong side of the ruling party’s supporters and endured similar harassment and attacks.

This treatment is, however, not reserved for Eritreans. Former BBC Africa Editor Martin Plaut on 30 November 2018 was lured into a meeting with an Eritrean “source” at the British Library in London and doused with a bucket of liquid for his journalistic work on human rights in the country, and called a “traitor”. Eritrea’s Ambassador to Japan Estifanos Afeworki praised the journalist’s attack on Twitter.

Nairobi: “Subversive, Terrorists”

In Nairobi in 2013, following an initiative to set up and register a diaspora civic organisation – the Eritrean Diaspora for East Africa (EDEA), the Eritrean Embassy revoked the Eritrean passport of Chairman and Co-founder Hussein Osman Said and had him arrested in South Sudan by alleging that he was a terrorist working to sabotage the Eritrean government.

EDEA officials told Amnesty International when they tried to launch the organisation in February 2015, two people who identified themselves as members of Kenya’s National Intelligence Service ordered them not to proceed with the event, alleging that they had intelligence that EDEA had been established to overthrow the Eritrean government.

Such baseless claims against activities planned by Eritreans in Kenya continued in 2017, when the Eritrean Embassy wrote to the United Nations Office in Nairobi (UNON) claiming some 13 guests invited for an art exhibition were “subversive”. UNON subsequently barred the 13 from entering the UN complex at Gigiri, where the exhibition was taking place.

“Eritrea’s use of its embassies abroad to harass and repress its critics must not be allowed to continue,” said Joan Nyanyuki.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Amnesty International.

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Significant new annual research grant of $150,000 for African environmental research
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, June 26, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- The Jennifer Ward Oppenheimer Research Grant (JWO Grant) is calling on the next generation of environmental researchers and conservation leaders from Africa to apply for an annual $150 000.00 grant.
Applications will open on 5 July 2019 to prospective grant recipients. 
The JWO Grant is set up to honour the late Mrs Jennifer Ward Oppenheimer and to continue her contribution to and passion for Africa, the environment and cutting-edge science.
Jonathan Oppenheimer said: “Jennifer was committed to the preservation of Africa’s natural heritage, and the need for investment into science to enable development. I am delighted to be launching this annual grant in her name and excited about the potential solutions that brilliant, young researchers, from the continent, will bring to this important endeavour.”
The JWO Grant will support an African-led research programme which significantly contributes to the advancement of environmental and allied sciences – specifically to identify and address real-world issues which affect Africa.
It aims to advance recognised environmental priorities across the African continent and the globe such as those in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the African Union’s Agenda 2063.
The Grant will be awarded annually to support a new three-year research programme. The JWO Grant will officially be launched with the announcement of the first grant winner at the annual 10th Oppenheimer Research Conference (ORC) – themed Advancing conservation consciousness – which will be held later this year between 1-3 October 2019.
Who qualifies?

The lead applicant should be an emerging African-born scientist, affiliated to a credible African institution. The proposed research should have a focus on solving African issues. The JWO Grant specifically targets inter- and multi-disciplinary research, concentrating on the natural environment, approached through a direct or supporting field. The fields include, but are not limited to:
Atmospheric sciences, Environmental technology, Archaeology, Environmental toxicology/pollution, Biology Environmental/ecological economics, Botany, Geosciences, Climate change, Hydrology, Conservation, Limnology, Ecology, Natural resource management, Energy, Oceanography, Environmental archaeology, Palaeontology, Environmental chemistry, Soil science, Environmental cultural anthropology/history, Sustainability science, Environmental engineering, Waste management, Environmental health, Water management, Environmental rehabilitation and remediation, Zoology and Environmental social science.
How to apply

The application process consists of two stages: the pre-proposal, which is open to all eligible applicants, and the full-proposal stage, which is by invitation only.
Pre-proposals must include the lead applicant’s details, a brief research concept, a project team overview, a high-level budget, a letter of support from the applicant’s institution and three references. Closing date for pre-proposals is 22 July 2019 at 5pm. Successful applicants will be notified via email.
Full proposals will include detailed technical and budget information. Invitations open 12 August and the full-proposal deadline is 9 September. The successful candidate will officially be awarded the JWO Research Grant at the annual 10th Oppenheimer Research Conference on 1 – 3 October 2019 in Midrand, Johannesburg, and will be required to present an overview of their research programme at the event.
 
Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA)on behalf of JWO Grant.
 
 
Please address all media queries to:
Kgomotso Moalusi 
(011) 566 6425
 
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Nairobi Moves Up In Mercer’s 25th Annual Cost Of Living Survey And Joins Other Expensive Cities
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments
  • Cities in Asia most expensive locations for employees working abroad
  • The world’s least expensive cities are Tunis, Tashkent and Karachi

NAIROBI, Kenya, June 26, 2019-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- Mercer, a global consulting leader in advancing health, wealth and careers, and a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies (NYSE: MMC), has released the results of its 2019 Cost of Living survey, ranking cities around the world.

Generally the cost of living in Nairobi, Kenya is moderate compared to other expat destinations. Last year, the Mercer Cost of Living report ranked it as a mid-range expense location (123rd out of 209 cities). However according to this year’s report, Nairobi has gone up from 123 to 97 on the ranking for the most costly cities.

N’Djamena, Chad takes the lead as the highest-ranking city in Africa. Kinshasa, Dem. Rep. of Congo (22) is in second place, rising fifteen places. Libreville, Gabon (24) is the next African city on the list, followed by Lagos, Nigeria (25), which moved up seventeen places. And despite dropping about 20 places, Luanda, Angola (26) still remains in fifth place.

“Each African country has its own unique economy and this is why multinationals need not approach their expatriate packages for Africa with one single strategy. Let’s look at it this way, while a city like N’Djamena in Chad has been listed as the 11th most expensive city in the world, whereas Mali comes in at the 124th position in terms of cost of living,” said Yolanda Sedlmaier, Principal Leader – Africa Mobility at Mercer.

In a rapidly changing world, mobility programs have become a core component of multinational organizations’ global talent strategy. Organizations realize that to thrive they must embrace change, adapt to new technologies, and build emerging skills to attract, motivate, and enhance talent.

“In a skill-focused economy driven by digital disruption and the need for a globally connected workforce, deploying expatriate employees is an increasingly important aspect of a competitive business strategy for global companies,” said Ilya Bonic, President of Mercer’s Career business. “There are numerous personal and organizational advantages for sending employees overseas, including career development, global experience, new skillsets, and re-allocation of resources. By offering fair and competitive compensation packages, organizations can facilitate moves that drive business results.”

Mercer’s 25th annual Cost of Living Survey finds that a number of factors, including currency fluctuations, cost of inflation for goods and services, and volatility in accommodation prices, contribute to the overall cost of expatriate packages for employees on international assignments.

Global ranking
Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey finds that eight out of the top ten of the world’s most expensive cities for expatriates are Asian cities, resulting from high costs for expatriate consumer goods and a dynamic housing market. Tokyo (2), Singapore (3) and Seoul (4) top the list, while the costliest city in the world for the second consecutive year is Hong Kong (1). Other cities appearing in the top ten are Zurich (5), Shanghai (6), Ashgabat (7), Beijing (8), New York City (9), and Shenzhen (10). The world’s least expensive cities for expatriates are Tunis (209), Tashkent (208), and Karachi (207).

Mercer’s widely recognized survey is one of the world’s most comprehensive, and is designed to help multinational companies and governments determine compensation allowances for their expatriate employees. New York City is used as the base city for all comparisons, and currency movements are measured against the US dollar. The survey includes over 500 cities throughout the world; this year’s ranking includes 209 cities across five continents and measures the comparative cost of more than 200 items in each location, including housing, transportation, food, clothing, household goods, and entertainment.

Mercer produces individual cost of living and rental accommodation cost reports for each city surveyed. For more information on city rankings, visit https://mobilityexchange.mercer.com/Insights/cost-of-living-rankings.

Notes for Editors
The figures for Mercer’s cost of living and rental accommodation cost comparisons are derived from a survey conducted in March 2019. Exchange rates from that time and Mercer’s international basket of goods and services from its Cost of Living Survey have been used as base measurements.

Governments and major companies use data from this survey to protect the purchasing power of their employees when transferred abroad; rental accommodation costs data is used to assess local expatriate housing allowances. The choice of cities surveyed is based on demand for data.

Mercer Cost of Living Survey – Worldwide Rankings 2019
(Mercer international basket, including rental accommodation costs)

Rank as of March

City

Country/Region

2018

2019

1

1

HONG KONG

Hong Kong (SAR)

2

2

TOKYO

Japan

4

3

SINGAPORE

Singapore

5

4

SEOUL

South Korea

3

5

ZURICH

Switzerland

7

6

SHANGHAI

China

43

7

ASHGABAT

Turkmenistan

9

8

BEIJING

China

13

9

NEW YORK CITY

United States

12

10

SHENZHEN

China

8

11

NDJAMENA

Chad

10

12

BERN

Switzerland

11

13

GENEVA

Switzerland

21

14

VICTORIA

Seychelles

16

15

TEL AVIV

Israel

28

16

SAN FRANCISCO

United States

15

17

GUANGZHOU

China

35

18

LOS ANGELES

United States

23

19

OSAKA

Japan

14

20

COPENHAGEN

Denmark

26

21

DUBAI

United Arab Emirates

37

22

KINSHASA

Dem. Rep. of the Congo

19

23

LONDON

United Kingdom

18

24

LIBREVILLE

Gabon

42

25

LAGOS

Nigeria

6

26

LUANDA

Angola

17

27

MOSCOW

Russia

25

27

NANJING

China

22

29

NOUMEA

New Caledonia

24

30

ABIDJAN

Côte d’Ivoire

31

30

CHENGDU

China

29

32

TIANJIN

China

40

33

ABU DHABI

United Arab Emirates

41

33

NAGOYA

Japan

27

35

TAIPEI

Taiwan

45

35

RIYADH

Saudi Arabia

51

37

CHICAGO

United States

54

38

HONOLULU

United States

19

39

BRAZZAVILLE

Congo

52

40

BANGKOK

Thailand

36

41

QINGDAO

China

56

42

WASHINGTON

United States

32

43

DUBLIN

Ireland

60

44

MIAMI

United States

33

45

MILAN

Italy

38

45

SHENYANG

China

34

47

PARIS

France

66

47

DHAKA

Bangladesh

70

49

BOSTON

United States

29

50

SYDNEY

Australia

39

51

VIENNA

Austria

43

52

YAOUNDE

Cameroon

65

53

BEIRUT

Lebanon

48

54

BANGUI

Central African Republic

46

55

ROME

Italy

79

56

WHITE PLAINS

United States

77

57

MANAMA

Bahrain

50

58

AMSTERDAM

Netherlands

73

59

DJIBOUTI

Djibouti

86

59

HOUSTON

United States

47

61

OSLO

Norway

85

62

DALLAS

United States

63

63

ACCRA

Ghana

90

64

SEATTLE

United States

53

65

HELSINKI

Finland

73

66

DOUALA

Cameroon

55

67

MUMBAI

India

57

67

MUNICH

Germany

95

69

ATLANTA

United States

75

70

MONTEVIDEO

Uruguay

97

70

MORRISTOWN

United States

62

72

DAKAR

Senegal

95

72

SAN JUAN

Puerto Rico

68

74

FRANKFURT

Germany

49

75

ST. PETERSBURG

Russia

94

75

AMMAN

Jordan

67

77

BRUSSELS

Belgium

102

78

MINNEAPOLIS

United States

58

79

MELBOURNE

Australia

69

79

SANTIAGO

Chile

71

81

BERLIN

Germany

64

82

MADRID

Spain

97

83

PORT OF SPAIN

Trinidad & Tobago

71

84

LUXEMBOURG

Luxembourg

99

85

ABUJA

Nigeria

58

86

SAO PAULO

Brazil

61

87

PERTH

Australia

106

88

CONAKRY

Guinea

81

89

AUCKLAND

New Zealand

116

90

DETROIT

United States

79

91

BARCELONA

Spain

82

92

DUSSELDORF

Germany

114

93

PANAMA CITY

Panama

122

94

ST. LOUIS

United States

93

95

LISBON

Portugal

77

96

CANBERRA

Australia

83

97

PRAGUE

Czech Republic

123

97

NAIROBI

Kenya

125

97

PITTSBURGH

United States

88

100

HAMBURG

Germany

117

100

JEDDAH

Saudi Arabia

106

102

BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN

Brunei

84

103

BRISBANE

Australia

117

103

MUSCAT

Oman

117

105

JAKARTA

Indonesia

125

106

CLEVELAND

United States

130

107

PORTLAND

United States

142

108

PHNOM PENH

Cambodia

87

109

ADELAIDE

Australia

138

109

MANILA

Philippines

92

111

RIGA

Latvia

109

112

VANCOUVER

Canada

137

112

HANOI

Vietnam

101

114

WELLINGTON

New Zealand

109

115

TORONTO

Canada

115

115

DOHA

Qatar

91

117

YANGON

Myanmar

103

118

NEW DELHI

India

121

119

KUWAIT CITY

Kuwait

124

120

HO CHI MINH CITY

Vietnam

99

121

RIO DE JANEIRO

Brazil

132

121

LIMA

Peru

105

123

LYON

France

120

124

BAMAKO

Mali

104

125

POINTE A PITRE

Guadeloupe

108

126

STUTTGART

Germany

89

127

STOCKHOLM

Sweden

111

128

COTONOU

Benin

112

128

ATHENS

Greece

128

128

CASABLANCA

Morocco

113

131

BRATISLAVA

Slovakia

141

131

SAN JOSE

Costa Rica

76

133

BUENOS AIRES

Argentina

165

133

HAVANA

Cuba

128

135

BIRMINGHAM

United Kingdom

130

136

GUATEMALA CITY

Guatemala

134

137

ABERDEEN

United Kingdom

161

138

WINSTON SALEM

United States

147

139

MONTREAL

Canada

140

140

TALLINN

Estonia

145

141

KUALA LUMPUR

Malaysia

132

142

LJUBLJANA

Slovenia

138

143

ZAGREB

Croatia

157

144

MEXICO CITY

Mexico

134

145

LOME

Togo

134

145

OUAGADOUGOU

Burkina Faso

148

145

GLASGOW

United Kingdom

156

148

QUITO

Ecuador

143

149

NIAMEY

Niger

173

150

KIEV

Ukraine

145

151

NUREMBERG

Germany

148

152

VILNIUS

Lithuania

154

153

CALGARY

Canada

144

154

CHENNAI

India

163

154

ISTANBUL

Turkey

150

156

LEIPZIG

Germany

164

157

KINGSTON

Jamaica

152

158

BELFAST

United Kingdom

179

159

MAPUTO

Mozambique

165

160

RABAT

Morocco

153

161

LIMASSOL

Cyprus

160

161

OTTAWA

Canada

161

161

PORT LOUIS

Mauritius

151

164

BUDAPEST

Hungary

125

165

PORT AU PRINCE

Haiti

172

166

TIRANA

Albania

174

166

SAN SALVADOR

El Salvador

188

166

CAIRO

Egypt

178

169

SANTO DOMINGO

Dominican Republic

168

170

BOGOTA

Colombia

180

171

DAR ES SALAAM

Tanzania

183

171

ADDIS ABABA

Ethiopia

154

173

WARSAW

Poland

158

174

BRASILIA

Brazil

169

175

KIGALI

Rwanda

176

176

BUCHAREST

Romania

175

177

SOFIA

Bulgaria

186

178

BAKU

Azerbaijan

170

179

BENGALURU

India

170

180

CAPE TOWN

South Africa

181

181

BELGRADE

Serbia

158

182

COLOMBO

Sri Lanka

192

183

KAMPALA

Uganda

195

184

ALGIERS

Algeria

177

185

JOHANNESBURG

South Africa

183

186

ASUNCION

Paraguay

193

187

MONTERREY

Mexico

165

188

HARARE

Zimbabwe

182

189

KOLKATA

India

189

189

GABORONE

Botswana

187

191

ALMATY

Kazakhstan

194

192

NOUAKCHOTT

Mauritania

204

193

BLANTYRE

Malawi

191

194

SARAJEVO

Bosnia and Herzegovina

199

195

LA PAZ

Bolivia

185

196

LUSAKA

Zambia

198

197

YEREVAN

Armenia

202

198

MINSK

Belarus

201

199

TEGUCIGALPA

Honduras

200

200

MANAGUA

Nicaragua

197

201

SKOPJE

Macedonia

203

202

TBILISI

Georgia

190

203

ISLAMABAD

Pakistan

196

204

WINDHOEK

Namibia

206

204

BANJUL

Gambia

207

206

BISHKEK

Kyrgyzstan

205

207

KARACHI

Pakistan

209

208

TASHKENT

Uzbekistan

208

209

TUNIS

Tunisia

Source: Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Mercer.

About Mercer
Mercer delivers advice and technology-driven solutions that help organizations meet the health, wealth and career needs of a changing workforce. Mercer’s more than 23,000 employees are based in 44 countries and the firm operates in over 130 countries. Mercer is a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies(NYSE: MMC), the leading global professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. With 75,000 colleagues and annualized revenue approaching $17 billion, Marsh & McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. Marsh & McLennan Companies is also the parent company of Marsh, which advises individual and commercial clients of all sizes on insurance broking and innovative risk management solutions; Guy Carpenter, which develops advanced risk, reinsurance and capital strategies that help clients grow profitably and pursue emerging opportunities; and Oliver Wyman, which serves as a critical strategic, economic and brand advisor to private sector and governmental clients.For more information, visit www.mercer-africa.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn Mercer Africa.

Media Contact
Zwile Nkosi
zwile.nkosi@mercer.com
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Lagos, Nigeria Listed By Mercer As The 4th Costliest City In Africa
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments
  • N’Djamena is the highest ranking in Africa
  • The world’s least expensive cities are Tunis, Tashkent and Karachi
  • Cities in Asia most expensive locations for employees working abroad

LAGOS, Nigeria, June 26, 2019-/African Media Agency(AMA)/- Incomparison with other cities in the world, Lagos, Nigeria continues to remain attractive for foreign investments despite being one of the most expensive in Africa. Mercer’s 25th annual Cost of Living Survey finds that a number of factors, including currency fluctuations, cost of inflation for goods and services, and volatility in accommodation prices, contribute to the overall cost of expatriate packages for employees on international assignments

Lagos, Nigeria is the 25th most expensive city in the world. Having moved up seventeen places from last year’s ranking, Nigeria’s commercial hub is one of Mercer’s top 5 costliest cities in Africa. Kinshasa, Dem. Rep. of Congo (22) is in second place, rising fifteen places. Libreville, Gabon (24) is the next African city on the list, followed by Lagos, Nigeria (25). Despite dropping about 20 places, Luanda, Angola (26) still remains in fifth place.

“Each African country has its own unique economy and this is why multinationals need not approach their expatriate packages for Africa with one single strategy. Let’s look at it this way, while a city like N’Djamena in Chad has been listed as the 11th most expensive city in the world, whereas Mali comes in at the 124th position in terms of cost of living,” said Yolanda Sedlmaier, Principal Leader – Africa Mobility at Mercer.

Global ranking
Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey finds that eight out of the top ten of the world’s most expensive cities for expatriates are Asian cities, resulting from high costs for expatriate consumer goods and a dynamic housing market. Tokyo (2), Singapore (3) and Seoul (4) top the list, while the costliest city in the world for the second consecutive year is Hong Kong (1). Other cities appearing in the top ten are Zurich (5), Shanghai (6), Ashgabat (7), Beijing (8), New York City (9), and Shenzhen (10). The world’s least expensive cities for expatriates are Tunis (209), Tashkent (208), and Karachi (207).

Mercer’s widely recognized survey is one of the world’s most comprehensive, and is designed to help multinational companies and governments determine compensation allowances for their expatriate employees. New York City is used as the base city for all comparisons, and currency movements are measured against the US dollar. The survey includes over 500 cities throughout the world; this year’s ranking includes 209 cities across five continents and measures the comparative cost of more than 200 items in each location, including housing, transportation, food, clothing, household goods, and entertainment.

Mercer produces individual cost of living and rental accommodation cost reports for each city surveyed. For more information on city rankings, visit https://mobilityexchange.mercer.com/Insights/cost-of-living-rankings.

Notes for Editors
The figures for Mercer’s cost of living and rental accommodation cost comparisons are derived from a survey conducted in March 2019. Exchange rates from that time and Mercer’s international basket of goods and services from its Cost of Living Survey have been used as base measurements.

Governments and major companies use data from this survey to protect the purchasing power of their employees when transferred abroad; rental accommodation costs data is used to assess local expatriate housing allowances. The choice of cities surveyed is based on demand for data.

Mercer Cost of Living Survey – Worldwide Rankings 2019
(Mercer international basket, including rental accommodation costs)

Rank as of March

City

Country/Region

2018

2019

1

1

HONG KONG

Hong Kong (SAR)

2

2

TOKYO

Japan

4

3

SINGAPORE

Singapore

5

4

SEOUL

South Korea

3

5

ZURICH

Switzerland

7

6

SHANGHAI

China

43

7

ASHGABAT

Turkmenistan

9

8

BEIJING

China

13

9

NEW YORK CITY

United States

12

10

SHENZHEN

China

8

11

NDJAMENA

Chad

10

12

BERN

Switzerland

11

13

GENEVA

Switzerland

21

14

VICTORIA

Seychelles

16

15

TEL AVIV

Israel

28

16

SAN FRANCISCO

United States

15

17

GUANGZHOU

China

35

18

LOS ANGELES

United States

23

19

OSAKA

Japan

14

20

COPENHAGEN

Denmark

26

21

DUBAI

United Arab Emirates

37

22

KINSHASA

Dem. Rep. of the Congo

19

23

LONDON

United Kingdom

18

24

LIBREVILLE

Gabon

42

25

LAGOS

Nigeria

6

26

LUANDA

Angola

17

27

MOSCOW

Russia

25

27

NANJING

China

22

29

NOUMEA

New Caledonia

24

30

ABIDJAN

Côte d’Ivoire

31

30

CHENGDU

China

29

32

TIANJIN

China

40

33

ABU DHABI

United Arab Emirates

41

33

NAGOYA

Japan

27

35

TAIPEI

Taiwan

45

35

RIYADH

Saudi Arabia

51

37

CHICAGO

United States

54

38

HONOLULU

United States

19

39

BRAZZAVILLE

Congo

52

40

BANGKOK

Thailand

36

41

QINGDAO

China

56

42

WASHINGTON

United States

32

43

DUBLIN

Ireland

60

44

MIAMI

United States

33

45

MILAN

Italy

38

45

SHENYANG

China

34

47

PARIS

France

66

47

DHAKA

Bangladesh

70

49

BOSTON

United States

29

50

SYDNEY

Australia

39

51

VIENNA

Austria

43

52

YAOUNDE

Cameroon

65

53

BEIRUT

Lebanon

48

54

BANGUI

Central African Republic

46

55

ROME

Italy

79

56

WHITE PLAINS

United States

77

57

MANAMA

Bahrain

50

58

AMSTERDAM

Netherlands

73

59

DJIBOUTI

Djibouti

86

59

HOUSTON

United States

47

61

OSLO

Norway

85

62

DALLAS

United States

63

63

ACCRA

Ghana

90

64

SEATTLE

United States

53

65

HELSINKI

Finland

73

66

DOUALA

Cameroon

55

67

MUMBAI

India

57

67

MUNICH

Germany

95

69

ATLANTA

United States

75

70

MONTEVIDEO

Uruguay

97

70

MORRISTOWN

United States

62

72

DAKAR

Senegal

95

72

SAN JUAN

Puerto Rico

68

74

FRANKFURT

Germany

49

75

ST. PETERSBURG

Russia

94

75

AMMAN

Jordan

67

77

BRUSSELS

Belgium

102

78

MINNEAPOLIS

United States

58

79

MELBOURNE

Australia

69

79

SANTIAGO

Chile

71

81

BERLIN

Germany

64

82

MADRID

Spain

97

83

PORT OF SPAIN

Trinidad & Tobago

71

84

LUXEMBOURG

Luxembourg

99

85

ABUJA

Nigeria

58

86

SAO PAULO

Brazil

61

87

PERTH

Australia

106

88

CONAKRY

Guinea

81

89

AUCKLAND

New Zealand

116

90

DETROIT

United States

79

91

BARCELONA

Spain

82

92

DUSSELDORF

Germany

114

93

PANAMA CITY

Panama

122

94

ST. LOUIS

United States

93

95

LISBON

Portugal

77

96

CANBERRA

Australia

83

97

PRAGUE

Czech Republic

123

97

NAIROBI

Kenya

125

97

PITTSBURGH

United States

88

100

HAMBURG

Germany

117

100

JEDDAH

Saudi Arabia

106

102

BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN

Brunei

84

103

BRISBANE

Australia

117

103

MUSCAT

Oman

117

105

JAKARTA

Indonesia

125

106

CLEVELAND

United States

130

107

PORTLAND

United States

142

108

PHNOM PENH

Cambodia

87

109

ADELAIDE

Australia

138

109

MANILA

Philippines

92

111

RIGA

Latvia

109

112

VANCOUVER

Canada

137

112

HANOI

Vietnam

101

114

WELLINGTON

New Zealand

109

115

TORONTO

Canada

115

115

DOHA

Qatar

91

117

YANGON

Myanmar

103

118

NEW DELHI

India

121

119

KUWAIT CITY

Kuwait

124

120

HO CHI MINH CITY

Vietnam

99

121

RIO DE JANEIRO

Brazil

132

121

LIMA

Peru

105

123

LYON

France

120

124

BAMAKO

Mali

104

125

POINTE A PITRE

Guadeloupe

108

126

STUTTGART

Germany

89

127

STOCKHOLM

Sweden

111

128

COTONOU

Benin

112

128

ATHENS

Greece

128

128

CASABLANCA

Morocco

113

131

BRATISLAVA

Slovakia

141

131

SAN JOSE

Costa Rica

76

133

BUENOS AIRES

Argentina

165

133

HAVANA

Cuba

128

135

BIRMINGHAM

United Kingdom

130

136

GUATEMALA CITY

Guatemala

134

137

ABERDEEN

United Kingdom

161

138

WINSTON SALEM

United States

147

139

MONTREAL

Canada

140

140

TALLINN

Estonia

145

141

KUALA LUMPUR

Malaysia

132

142

LJUBLJANA

Slovenia

138

143

ZAGREB

Croatia

157

144

MEXICO CITY

Mexico

134

145

LOME

Togo

134

145

OUAGADOUGOU

Burkina Faso

148

145

GLASGOW

United Kingdom

156

148

QUITO

Ecuador

143

149

NIAMEY

Niger

173

150

KIEV

Ukraine

145

151

NUREMBERG

Germany

148

152

VILNIUS

Lithuania

154

153

CALGARY

Canada

144

154

CHENNAI

India

163

154

ISTANBUL

Turkey

150

156

LEIPZIG

Germany

164

157

KINGSTON

Jamaica

152

158

BELFAST

United Kingdom

179

159

MAPUTO

Mozambique

165

160

RABAT

Morocco

153

161

LIMASSOL

Cyprus

160

161

OTTAWA

Canada

161

161

PORT LOUIS

Mauritius

151

164

BUDAPEST

Hungary

125

165

PORT AU PRINCE

Haiti

172

166

TIRANA

Albania

174

166

SAN SALVADOR

El Salvador

188

166

CAIRO

Egypt

178

169

SANTO DOMINGO

Dominican Republic

168

170

BOGOTA

Colombia

180

171

DAR ES SALAAM

Tanzania

183

171

ADDIS ABABA

Ethiopia

154

173

WARSAW

Poland

158

174

BRASILIA

Brazil

169

175

KIGALI

Rwanda

176

176

BUCHAREST

Romania

175

177

SOFIA

Bulgaria

186

178

BAKU

Azerbaijan

170

179

BENGALURU

India

170

180

CAPE TOWN

South Africa

181

181

BELGRADE

Serbia

158

182

COLOMBO

Sri Lanka

192

183

KAMPALA

Uganda

195

184

ALGIERS

Algeria

177

185

JOHANNESBURG

South Africa

183

186

ASUNCION

Paraguay

193

187

MONTERREY

Mexico

165

188

HARARE

Zimbabwe

182

189

KOLKATA

India

189

189

GABORONE

Botswana

187

191

ALMATY

Kazakhstan

194

192

NOUAKCHOTT

Mauritania

204

193

BLANTYRE

Malawi

191

194

SARAJEVO

Bosnia and Herzegovina

199

195

LA PAZ

Bolivia

185

196

LUSAKA

Zambia

198

197

YEREVAN

Armenia

202

198

MINSK

Belarus

201

199

TEGUCIGALPA

Honduras

200

200

MANAGUA

Nicaragua

197

201

SKOPJE

Macedonia

203

202

TBILISI

Georgia

190

203

ISLAMABAD

Pakistan

196

204

WINDHOEK

Namibia

206

204

BANJUL

Gambia

207

206

BISHKEK

Kyrgyzstan

205

207

KARACHI

Pakistan

209

208

TASHKENT

Uzbekistan

208

209

TUNIS

Tunisia

Source: Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Mercer.

About Mercer
Mercer delivers advice and technology-driven solutions that help organizations meet the health, wealth and career needs of a changing workforce. Mercer’s more than 23,000 employees are based in 44 countries and the firm operates in over 130 countries. Mercer is a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies(NYSE: MMC), the leading global professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. With 75,000 colleagues and annualized revenue approaching $17 billion, Marsh & McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. Marsh & McLennan Companies is also the parent company of Marsh, which advises individual and commercial clients of all sizes on insurance broking and innovative risk management solutions; Guy Carpenter, which develops advanced risk, reinsurance and capital strategies that help clients grow profitably and pursue emerging opportunities; and Oliver Wyman, which serves as a critical strategic, economic and brand advisor to private sector and governmental clients.For more information, visit www.mercer-africa.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn Mercer Africa.

Media Contact
Zwile Nkosi
zwile.nkosi@mercer.com
+27 66 483 8974

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Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey Ranks Morocco as the 128th Most Expensive City in the World For Expatriates to Live
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments
  • The world’s least expensive cities are Tunis, Tashkent and Karachi
  • Cities in Asia most expensive locations for employees working abroad

RABAT, Morocco, June 26, 2019 -/African Media Agency( AMA)/-According to Mercer’s 2019 cost of living survey, Casablanca is the 128th most expensive city in the world, the same position it held last year. Rabat, on the other hand, has gone up from 165 to 160. N’Djamena, Chad takes the lead as the highest-ranking city in Africa, while Kinshasa, Dem. Rep. of Congo (22) is in second place, rising fifteen places. Additionally, Libreville, Gabon (24) is the next African city on the list, followed by Lagos, Nigeria (25), which moved up seventeen places. And despite dropping about 20 places, Luanda, Angola (26) still remains in fifth place.

Mercer’s 25th annual Cost of Living Survey finds that a number of factors, including currency fluctuations, cost of inflation for goods and services, and volatility in accommodation prices, contribute to the overall cost of expatriate packages for employees on international assignments.

“Each African country has its own unique economy and this is why multinationals need not approach their expatriate packages for Africa with one single strategy. Let’s look at it this way, while a city like N’Djamena in Chad has been listed as the 11th most expensive city in the world, whereas Mali comes in at the 124th position in terms of cost of living,” said Yolanda Sedlmaier, Principal Leader – Africa Mobility at Mercer.

Global ranking

In a rapidly changing world, mobility programs have become a core component of multinational organizations’ global talent strategy. Organizations realize that to thrive they must embrace change, adapt to new technologies, and build emerging skills to attract, motivate, and enhance talent.

“In a skill-focused economy driven by digital disruption and the need for a globally connected workforce, deploying expatriate employees is an increasingly important aspect of a competitive business strategy for global companies,” said Ilya Bonic, President of Mercer’s Career business. “There are numerous personal and organizational advantages for sending employees overseas, including career development, global experience, new skillsets, and re-allocation of resources. By offering fair and competitive compensation packages, organizations can facilitate moves that drive business results.”

Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey finds that eight out of the top ten of the world’s most expensive cities for expatriates are Asian cities, resulting from high costs for expatriate consumer goods and a dynamic housing market. Tokyo (2), Singapore (3) and Seoul (4) top the list, while the costliest city in the world for the second consecutive year is Hong Kong (1). Other cities appearing in the top ten are Zurich (5), Shanghai (6), Ashgabat (7), Beijing (8), New York City (9), and Shenzhen (10). The world’s least expensive cities for expatriates are Tunis (209), Tashkent (208), and Karachi (207).

Mercer’s widely recognized survey is one of the world’s most comprehensive, and is designed to help multinational companies and governments determine compensation allowances for their expatriate employees. New York City is used as the base city for all comparisons, and currency movements are measured against the US dollar. The survey includes over 500 cities throughout the world; this year’s ranking includes 209 cities across five continents and measures the comparative cost of more than 200 items in each location, including housing, transportation, food, clothing, household goods, and entertainment.

Notes for Editors

The figures for Mercer’s cost of living and rental accommodation cost comparisons are derived from a survey conducted in March 2019. Exchange rates from that time and Mercer’s international basket of goods and services from its Cost of Living Survey have been used as base measurements.

Governments and major companies use data from this survey to protect the purchasing power of their employees when transferred abroad; rental accommodation costs data is used to assess local expatriate housing allowances. The choice of cities surveyed is based on demand for data.

Mercer Cost of Living Survey – Worldwide Rankings 2019
(Mercer international basket, including rental accommodation costs)

Rank as of March

City

Country/Region

2018

2019

1

1

HONG KONG

Hong Kong (SAR)

2

2

TOKYO

Japan

4

3

SINGAPORE

Singapore

5

4

SEOUL

South Korea

3

5

ZURICH

Switzerland

7

6

SHANGHAI

China

43

7

ASHGABAT

Turkmenistan

9

8

BEIJING

China

13

9

NEW YORK CITY

United States

12

10

SHENZHEN

China

8

11

NDJAMENA

Chad

10

12

BERN

Switzerland

11

13

GENEVA

Switzerland

21

14

VICTORIA

Seychelles

16

15

TEL AVIV

Israel

28

16

SAN FRANCISCO

United States

15

17

GUANGZHOU

China

35

18

LOS ANGELES

United States

23

19

OSAKA

Japan

14

20

COPENHAGEN

Denmark

26

21

DUBAI

United Arab Emirates

37

22

KINSHASA

Dem. Rep. of the Congo

19

23

LONDON

United Kingdom

18

24

LIBREVILLE

Gabon

42

25

LAGOS

Nigeria

6

26

LUANDA

Angola

17

27

MOSCOW

Russia

25

27

NANJING

China

22

29

NOUMEA

New Caledonia

24

30

ABIDJAN

Côte d’Ivoire

31

30

CHENGDU

China

29

32

TIANJIN

China

40

33

ABU DHABI

United Arab Emirates

41

33

NAGOYA

Japan

27

35

TAIPEI

Taiwan

45

35

RIYADH

Saudi Arabia

51

37

CHICAGO

United States

54

38

HONOLULU

United States

19

39

BRAZZAVILLE

Congo

52

40

BANGKOK

Thailand

36

41

QINGDAO

China

56

42

WASHINGTON

United States

32

43

DUBLIN

Ireland

60

44

MIAMI

United States

33

45

MILAN

Italy

38

45

SHENYANG

China

34

47

PARIS

France

66

47

DHAKA

Bangladesh

70

49

BOSTON

United States

29

50

SYDNEY

Australia

39

51

VIENNA

Austria

43

52

YAOUNDE

Cameroon

65

53

BEIRUT

Lebanon

48

54

BANGUI

Central African Republic

46

55

ROME

Italy

79

56

WHITE PLAINS

United States

77

57

MANAMA

Bahrain

50

58

AMSTERDAM

Netherlands

73

59

DJIBOUTI

Djibouti

86

59

HOUSTON

United States

47

61

OSLO

Norway

85

62

DALLAS

United States

63

63

ACCRA

Ghana

90

64

SEATTLE

United States

53

65

HELSINKI

Finland

73

66

DOUALA

Cameroon

55

67

MUMBAI

India

57

67

MUNICH

Germany

95

69

ATLANTA

United States

75

70

MONTEVIDEO

Uruguay

97

70

MORRISTOWN

United States

62

72

DAKAR

Senegal

95

72

SAN JUAN

Puerto Rico

68

74

FRANKFURT

Germany

49

75

ST. PETERSBURG

Russia

94

75

AMMAN

Jordan

67

77

BRUSSELS

Belgium

102

78

MINNEAPOLIS

United States

58

79

MELBOURNE

Australia

69

79

SANTIAGO

Chile

71

81

BERLIN

Germany

64

82

MADRID

Spain

97

83

PORT OF SPAIN

Trinidad & Tobago

71

84

LUXEMBOURG

Luxembourg

99

85

ABUJA

Nigeria

58

86

SAO PAULO

Brazil

61

87

PERTH

Australia

106

88

CONAKRY

Guinea

81

89

AUCKLAND

New Zealand

116

90

DETROIT

United States

79

91

BARCELONA

Spain

82

92

DUSSELDORF

Germany

114

93

PANAMA CITY

Panama

122

94

ST. LOUIS

United States

93

95

LISBON

Portugal

77

96

CANBERRA

Australia

83

97

PRAGUE

Czech Republic

123

97

NAIROBI

Kenya

125

97

PITTSBURGH

United States

88

100

HAMBURG

Germany

117

100

JEDDAH

Saudi Arabia

106

102

BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN

Brunei

84

103

BRISBANE

Australia

117

103

MUSCAT

Oman

117

105

JAKARTA

Indonesia

125

106

CLEVELAND

United States

130

107

PORTLAND

United States

142

108

PHNOM PENH

Cambodia

87

109

ADELAIDE

Australia

138

109

MANILA

Philippines

92

111

RIGA

Latvia

109

112

VANCOUVER

Canada

137

112

HANOI

Vietnam

101

114

WELLINGTON

New Zealand

109

115

TORONTO

Canada

115

115

DOHA

Qatar

91

117

YANGON

Myanmar

103

118

NEW DELHI

India

121

119

KUWAIT CITY

Kuwait

124

120

HO CHI MINH CITY

Vietnam

99

121

RIO DE JANEIRO

Brazil

132

121

LIMA

Peru

105

123

LYON

France

120

124

BAMAKO

Mali

104

125

POINTE A PITRE

Guadeloupe

108

126

STUTTGART

Germany

89

127

STOCKHOLM

Sweden

111

128

COTONOU

Benin

112

128

ATHENS

Greece

128

128

CASABLANCA

Morocco

113

131

BRATISLAVA

Slovakia

141

131

SAN JOSE

Costa Rica

76

133

BUENOS AIRES

Argentina

165

133

HAVANA

Cuba

128

135

BIRMINGHAM

United Kingdom

130

136

GUATEMALA CITY

Guatemala

134

137

ABERDEEN

United Kingdom

161

138

WINSTON SALEM

United States

147

139

MONTREAL

Canada

140

140

TALLINN

Estonia

145

141

KUALA LUMPUR

Malaysia

132

142

LJUBLJANA

Slovenia

138

143

ZAGREB

Croatia

157

144

MEXICO CITY

Mexico

134

145

LOME

Togo

134

145

OUAGADOUGOU

Burkina Faso

148

145

GLASGOW

United Kingdom

156

148

QUITO

Ecuador

143

149

NIAMEY

Niger

173

150

KIEV

Ukraine

145

151

NUREMBERG

Germany

148

152

VILNIUS

Lithuania

154

153

CALGARY

Canada

144

154

CHENNAI

India

163

154

ISTANBUL

Turkey

150

156

LEIPZIG

Germany

164

157

KINGSTON

Jamaica

152

158

BELFAST

United Kingdom

179

159

MAPUTO

Mozambique

165

160

RABAT

Morocco

153

161

LIMASSOL

Cyprus

160

161

OTTAWA

Canada

161

161

PORT LOUIS

Mauritius

151

164

BUDAPEST

Hungary

125

165

PORT AU PRINCE

Haiti

172

166

TIRANA

Albania

174

166

SAN SALVADOR

El Salvador

188

166

CAIRO

Egypt

178

169

SANTO DOMINGO

Dominican Republic

168

170

BOGOTA

Colombia

180

171

DAR ES SALAAM

Tanzania

183

171

ADDIS ABABA

Ethiopia

154

173

WARSAW

Poland

158

174

BRASILIA

Brazil

169

175

KIGALI

Rwanda

176

176

BUCHAREST

Romania

175

177

SOFIA

Bulgaria

186

178

BAKU

Azerbaijan

170

179

BENGALURU

India

170

180

CAPE TOWN

South Africa

181

181

BELGRADE

Serbia

158

182

COLOMBO

Sri Lanka

192

183

KAMPALA

Uganda

195

184

ALGIERS

Algeria

177

185

JOHANNESBURG

South Africa

183

186

ASUNCION

Paraguay

193

187

MONTERREY

Mexico

165

188

HARARE

Zimbabwe

182

189

KOLKATA

India

189

189

GABORONE

Botswana

187

191

ALMATY

Kazakhstan

194

192

NOUAKCHOTT

Mauritania

204

193

BLANTYRE

Malawi

191

194

SARAJEVO

Bosnia and Herzegovina

199

195

LA PAZ

Bolivia

185

196

LUSAKA

Zambia

198

197

YEREVAN

Armenia

202

198

MINSK

Belarus

201

199

TEGUCIGALPA

Honduras

200

200

MANAGUA

Nicaragua

197

201

SKOPJE

Macedonia

203

202

TBILISI

Georgia

190

203

ISLAMABAD

Pakistan

196

204

WINDHOEK

Namibia

206

204

BANJUL

Gambia

207

206

BISHKEK

Kyrgyzstan

205

207

KARACHI

Pakistan

209

208

TASHKENT

Uzbekistan

208

209

TUNIS

Tunisia

Source: Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Mercer.

About Mercer
Mercer delivers advice and technology-driven solutions that help organizations meet the health, wealth and career needs of a changing workforce. Mercer’s more than 23,000 employees are based in 44 countries and the firm operates in over 130 countries. Mercer is a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies(NYSE: MMC), the leading global professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. With 75,000 colleagues and annualized revenue approaching $17 billion, Marsh & McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. Marsh & McLennan Companies is also the parent company of Marsh, which advises individual and commercial clients of all sizes on insurance broking and innovative risk management solutions; Guy Carpenter, which develops advanced risk, reinsurance and capital strategies that help clients grow profitably and pursue emerging opportunities; and Oliver Wyman, which serves as a critical strategic, economic and brand advisor to private sector and governmental clients.For more information, visit www.mercer-africa.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn Mercer Africa.

Media Contact
Zwile Nkosi
zwile.nkosi@mercer.com
+27 66 483 8974

Read More
Mercer’s 25th Annual Cost Of Living Survey Ranks South Africa As One Of The Least Expensive Cities In The World
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments
  • The world’s least expensive cities are Tunis, Tashkent and Karachi
  • Cities in Asia most expensive locations for employees working abroad

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, June 26, 2019-/African Media Agency(AMA)/-Mercer, a global consulting leader in advancing health, wealth and careers, and a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies (NYSE: MMC), has released the results of its 2019 Cost of Living survey, ranking cities around the world. Mercer’s 25th annual Cost of Living Survey finds that a number of factors, including currency fluctuations, cost of inflation for goods and services, and volatility in accommodation prices, contribute to the overall cost of expatriate packages for employees on international assignments.

According to the report, South Africa’s Cape Town and Johannesburg both dropped from 170 to 180 and 177 to 185 respectively. Thus making these cities some of the least expensive in Africa. N’Djamena, Chad takes the lead as the highest-ranking city in Africa. Kinshasa, Dem. Rep. of Congo (22) is in second place, rising fifteen places. Libreville, Gabon (24) is the next African city on the list, followed by Lagos, Nigeria (25), which moved up seventeen places. And despite dropping about 20 places, Luanda, Angola (26) still remains in fifth place.

However, cities like Banjul in Gambia (204) and Windhoek, Namibia (204) are among the bottom 10 cities on the ranking.

“Each African country has its own unique economy and this is why multinationals need not approach their expatriate packages for Africa with one single strategy. Let’s look at it this way, while a city like N’Djamena in Chad has been listed as the 11th most expensive city in the world, whereas Mali comes in at the 124th position in terms of cost of living,” said Yolanda Sedlmaier, Principal Leader – Africa Mobility at Mercer.

 

Global ranking

In a rapidly changing world, mobility programs have become a core component of multinational organizations’ global talent strategy. Organizations realize that to thrive they must embrace change, adapt to new technologies, and build emerging skills to attract, motivate, and enhance talent.

“In a skill-focused economy driven by digital disruption and the need for a globally connected workforce, deploying expatriate employees is an increasingly important aspect of a competitive business strategy for global companies,” said Ilya Bonic, President of Mercer’s Career business. “There are numerous personal and organizational advantages for sending employees overseas, including career development, global experience, new skillsets, and re-allocation of resources. By offering fair and competitive compensation packages, organizations can facilitate moves that drive business results.”

Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey finds that eight out of the top ten of the world’s most expensive cities for expatriates are Asian cities, resulting from high costs for expatriate consumer goods and a dynamic housing market. Tokyo (2), Singapore (3) and Seoul (4) top the list, while the costliest city in the world for the second consecutive year is Hong Kong (1). Other cities appearing in the top ten are Zurich (5), Shanghai (6), Ashgabat (7), Beijing (8), New York City (9), and Shenzhen (10). The world’s least expensive cities for expatriates are Tunis (209), Tashkent (208), and Karachi (207).

Mercer’s widely recognized survey is one of the world’s most comprehensive, and is designed to help multinational companies and governments determine compensation allowances for their expatriate employees. New York City is used as the base city for all comparisons, and currency movements are measured against the US dollar. The survey includes over 500 cities throughout the world; this year’s ranking includes 209 cities across five continents and measures the comparative cost of more than 200 items in each location, including housing, transportation, food, clothing, household goods, and entertainment.

Mercer produces individual cost of living and rental accommodation cost reports for each city surveyed. For more information on city rankings, visit https://mobilityexchange.mercer.com/Insights/cost-of-living-rankings.

Notes for Editors

The figures for Mercer’s cost of living and rental accommodation cost comparisons are derived from a survey conducted in March 2019. Exchange rates from that time and Mercer’s international basket of goods and services from its Cost of Living Survey have been used as base measurements.

Governments and major companies use data from this survey to protect the purchasing power of their employees when transferred abroad; rental accommodation costs data is used to assess local expatriate housing allowances. The choice of cities surveyed is based on demand for data.
https://mobilityexchange.mercer.com/Insights/cost-of-living-rankings

Mercer Cost of Living Survey – Worldwide Rankings 2019

 

Mercer Cost of Living Survey – Worldwide Rankings 2019

(Mercer international basket, including rental accommodation costs)

Rank as of March

City

Country/ Region

2018

2019

1

1

HONG KONG

Hong Kong (SAR)

2

2

TOKYO

Japan

4

3

SINGAPORE

Singapore

5

4

SEOUL

South Korea

3

5

ZURICH

Switzerland

7

6

SHANGHAI

China

43

7

ASHGABAT

Turkmenistan

9

8

BEIJING

China

13

9

NEW YORK CITY

United States

12

10

SHENZHEN

China

8

11

NDJAMENA

Chad

10

12

BERN

Switzerland

11

13

GENEVA

Switzerland

21

14

VICTORIA

Seychelles

16

15

TEL AVIV

Israel

28

16

SAN FRANCISCO

United States

15

17

GUANGZHOU

China

35

18

LOS ANGELES

United States

23

19

OSAKA

Japan

14

20

COPENHAGEN

Denmark

26

21

DUBAI

United Arab Emirates

37

22

KINSHASA

Dem. Rep. of the Congo

19

23

LONDON

United Kingdom

18

24

LIBREVILLE

Gabon

42

25

LAGOS

Nigeria

6

26

LUANDA

Angola

17

27

MOSCOW

Russia

25

27

NANJING

China

22

29

NOUMEA

New Caledonia

24

30

ABIDJAN

Côte d’Ivoire

31

30

CHENGDU

China

29

32

TIANJIN

China

40

33

ABU DHABI

United Arab Emirates

41

33

NAGOYA

Japan

27

35

TAIPEI

Taiwan

45

35

RIYADH

Saudi Arabia

51

37

CHICAGO

United States

54

38

HONOLULU

United States

19

39

BRAZZAVILLE

Congo

52

40

BANGKOK

Thailand

36

41

QINGDAO

China

56

42

WASHINGTON

United States

32

43

DUBLIN

Ireland

60

44

MIAMI

United States

33

45

MILAN

Italy

38

45

SHENYANG

China

34

47

PARIS

France

66

47

DHAKA

Bangladesh

70

49

BOSTON

United States

29

50

SYDNEY

Australia

39

51

VIENNA

Austria

43

52

YAOUNDE

Cameroon

65

53

BEIRUT

Lebanon

48

54

BANGUI

Central African Republic

46

55

ROME

Italy

79

56

WHITE PLAINS

United States

77

57

MANAMA

Bahrain

50

58

AMSTERDAM

Netherlands

73

59

DJIBOUTI

Djibouti

86

59

HOUSTON

United States

47

61

OSLO

Norway

85

62

DALLAS

United States

63

63

ACCRA

Ghana

90

64

SEATTLE

United States

53

65

HELSINKI

Finland

73

66

DOUALA

Cameroon

55

67

MUMBAI

India

57

67

MUNICH

Germany

95

69

ATLANTA

United States

75

70

MONTEVIDEO

Uruguay

97

70

MORRISTOWN

United States

62

72

DAKAR

Senegal

95

72

SAN JUAN

Puerto Rico

68

74

FRANKFURT

Germany

49

75

ST. PETERSBURG

Russia

94

75

AMMAN

Jordan

67

77

BRUSSELS

Belgium

102

78

MINNEAPOLIS

United States

58

79

MELBOURNE

Australia

69

79

SANTIAGO

Chile

71

81

BERLIN

Germany

64

82

MADRID

Spain

97

83

PORT OF SPAIN

Trinidad & Tobago

71

84

LUXEMBOURG

Luxembourg

99

85

ABUJA

Nigeria

58

86

SAO PAULO

Brazil

61

87

PERTH

Australia

106

88

CONAKRY

Guinea

81

89

AUCKLAND

New Zealand

116

90

DETROIT

United States

79

91

BARCELONA

Spain

82

92

DUSSELDORF

Germany

114

93

PANAMA CITY

Panama

122

94

ST. LOUIS

United States

93

95

LISBON

Portugal

77

96

CANBERRA

Australia

83

97

PRAGUE

Czech Republic

123

97

NAIROBI

Kenya

125

97

PITTSBURGH

United States

88

100

HAMBURG

Germany

117

100

JEDDAH

Saudi Arabia

106

102

BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN

Brunei

84

103

BRISBANE

Australia

117

103

MUSCAT

Oman

117

105

JAKARTA

Indonesia

125

106

CLEVELAND

United States

130

107

PORTLAND

United States

142

108

PHNOM PENH

Cambodia

87

109

ADELAIDE

Australia

138

109

MANILA

Philippines

92

111

RIGA

Latvia

109

112

VANCOUVER

Canada

137

112

HANOI

Vietnam

101

114

WELLINGTON

New Zealand

109

115

TORONTO

Canada

115

115

DOHA

Qatar

91

117

YANGON

Myanmar

103

118

NEW DELHI

India

121

119

KUWAIT CITY

Kuwait

124

120

HO CHI MINH CITY

Vietnam

99

121

RIO DE JANEIRO

Brazil

132

121

LIMA

Peru

105

123

LYON

France

120

124

BAMAKO

Mali

104

125

POINTE A PITRE

Guadeloupe

108

126

STUTTGART

Germany

89

127

STOCKHOLM

Sweden

111

128

COTONOU

Benin

112

128

ATHENS

Greece

128

128

CASABLANCA

Morocco

113

131

BRATISLAVA

Slovakia

141

131

SAN JOSE

Costa Rica

76

133

BUENOS AIRES

Argentina

165

133

HAVANA

Cuba

128

135

BIRMINGHAM

United Kingdom

130

136

GUATEMALA CITY

Guatemala

134

137

ABERDEEN

United Kingdom

161

138

WINSTON SALEM

United States

147

139

MONTREAL

Canada

140

140

TALLINN

Estonia

145

141

KUALA LUMPUR

Malaysia

132

142

LJUBLJANA

Slovenia

138

143

ZAGREB

Croatia

157

144

MEXICO CITY

Mexico

134

145

LOME

Togo

134

145

OUAGADOUGOU

Burkina Faso

148

145

GLASGOW

United Kingdom

156

148

QUITO

Ecuador

143

149

NIAMEY

Niger

173

150

KIEV

Ukraine

145

151

NUREMBERG

Germany

148

152

VILNIUS

Lithuania

154

153

CALGARY

Canada

144

154

CHENNAI

India

163

154

ISTANBUL

Turkey

150

156

LEIPZIG

Germany

164

157

KINGSTON

Jamaica

152

158

BELFAST

United Kingdom

179

159

MAPUTO

Mozambique

165

160

RABAT

Morocco

153

161

LIMASSOL

Cyprus

160

161

OTTAWA

Canada

161

161

PORT LOUIS

Mauritius

151

164

BUDAPEST

Hungary

125

165

PORT AU PRINCE

Haiti

172

166

TIRANA

Albania

174

166

SAN SALVADOR

El Salvador

188

166

CAIRO

Egypt

178

169

SANTO DOMINGO

Dominican Republic

168

170

BOGOTA

Colombia

180

171

DAR ES SALAAM

Tanzania

183

171

ADDIS ABABA

Ethiopia

154

173

WARSAW

Poland

158

174

BRASILIA

Brazil

169

175

KIGALI

Rwanda

176

176

BUCHAREST

Romania

175

177

SOFIA

Bulgaria

186

178

BAKU

Azerbaijan

170

179

BENGALURU

India

170

180

CAPE TOWN

South Africa

181

181

BELGRADE

Serbia

158

182

COLOMBO

Sri Lanka

192

183

KAMPALA

Uganda

195

184

ALGIERS

Algeria

177

185

JOHANNESBURG

South Africa

183

186

ASUNCION

Paraguay

193

187

MONTERREY

Mexico

165

188

HARARE

Zimbabwe

182

189

KOLKATA

India

189

189

GABORONE

Botswana

187

191

ALMATY

Kazakhstan

194

192

NOUAKCHOTT

Mauritania

204

193

BLANTYRE

Malawi

191

194

SARAJEVO

Bosnia and Herzegovina

199

195

LA PAZ

Bolivia

185

196

LUSAKA

Zambia

198

197

YEREVAN

Armenia

202

198

MINSK

Belarus

201

199

TEGUCIGALPA

Honduras

200

200

MANAGUA

Nicaragua

197

201

SKOPJE

Macedonia

203

202

TBILISI

Georgia

190

203

ISLAMABAD

Pakistan

196

204

WINDHOEK

Namibia

206

204

BANJUL

Gambia

207

206

BISHKEK

Kyrgyzstan

205

207

KARACHI

Pakistan

209

208

TASHKENT

Uzbekistan

208

209

TUNIS

Tunisia

Source: Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Mercer.

About Mercer

Mercer delivers advice and technology-driven solutions that help organizations meet the health, wealth and career needs of a changing workforce. Mercer’s more than 23,000 employees are based in 44 countries and the firm operates in over 130 countries. Mercer is a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies(NYSE: MMC), the leading global professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. With 75,000 colleagues and annualized revenue approaching $17 billion, Marsh & McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. Marsh & McLennan Companies is also the parent company of Marsh, which advises individual and commercial clients of all sizes on insurance broking and innovative risk management solutions; Guy Carpenter, which develops advanced risk, reinsurance and capital strategies that help clients grow profitably and pursue emerging opportunities; and Oliver Wyman, which serves as a critical strategic, economic and brand advisor to private sector and governmental clients.For more information, visit www.mercer-africa.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn Mercer Africa.

 

Media Contact

Zwile Nkosi 

zwile.nkosi@mercer.com 

+27 66 483 8974

Read More
Mercer’s 25th annual Cost of Living Survey reveals N’Djamena is the highest ranking in Africa
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments
  • Cities in Asia most expensive locations for employees working abroad
  • Multinationals’ focus on mobility as a workforce strategy supports career growth and global competitiveness

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa, June 26, 2019-/African Media Agency(AMA)/-Mercer, a global consulting leader in advancing health, wealth and careers, and a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies (NYSE: MMC), has released the results of its 2019 Cost of Living survey, ranking cities around the world. Mercer’s 25th annual Cost of Living Survey finds that a number of factors, including currency fluctuations, cost of inflation for goods and services, and volatility in accommodation prices, contribute to the overall cost of expatriate packages for employees on international assignments. According to the report, N’Djamena, Chad takes the lead as the highest-ranking city in Africa. 

In a rapidly changing world, mobility programs have become a core component of multinational organizations’ global talent strategy. Organizations realize that to thrive they must embrace change, adapt to new technologies, and build emerging skills to attract, motivate, and enhance talent.

“In a skill-focused economy driven by digital disruption and the need for a globally connected workforce, deploying expatriate employees is an increasingly important aspect of a competitive business strategy for global companies,” said Ilya Bonic, President of Mercer’s Career business. “There are numerous personal and organizational advantages for sending employees overseas, including career development, global experience, new skillsets, and re-allocation of resources. By offering fair and competitive compensation packages, organizations can facilitate moves that drive business results.”

Key African Findings

Kinshasa, Dem. Rep. of Congo (22) is in second place, rising fifteen places. Libreville, Gabon (24) is the next African city on the list, followed by Lagos, Nigeria (25), which moved up seventeen places.
Despite dropping about 20 places, Luanda, Angola (26) still remains in fifth place.

As compared to last year’s report, some African countries like Conakry in Guinea and Nairobi, Kenya have gone up from 106 to 88 and from 123 to 97 respectively.

Douala in Cameroon and Maputo in Mozambique have seen a noticeable increase in exchange rates. Whereas the opposite has been recorded for Brazzaville, Congo (39). Other costly African cities include are Dakar (72) and Abuja (85).
“Contrary to the perception that the African market is very volatile, certain factors like currency fluctuations and housing costs contribute to varying Cost of Living differentials in developed economies,” said Yolanda Sedlmaier, Principal Leader – Africa Mobility at Mercer. “Each African country has its own unique economy and this is why multinationals need not approach their expatriate packages for Africa with one single strategy. Let’s look at it this way, while a city like N’Djamena in Chad has been listed as the 11th most expensive city in the world, whereas Mali comes in at the 124th position in terms of cost of living,” Yolanda Sedlmaier, added.

Global ranking

Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey finds that eight out of the top ten of the world’s most expensive cities for expatriates are Asian cities, resulting from high costs for expatriate consumer goods and a dynamic housing market. Tokyo (2), Singapore (3) and Seoul (4) top the list, while the costliest city in the world for the second consecutive year is Hong Kong (1). Other cities appearing in the top ten are Zurich (5), Shanghai (6), Ashgabat (7), Beijing (8), New York City (9), and Shenzhen (10). The world’s least expensive cities for expatriates are Tunis (209), Tashkent (208), and Karachi (207).

Mercer’s widely recognized survey is one of the world’s most comprehensive, and is designed to help multinational companies and governments determine compensation allowances for their expatriate employees. New York City is used as the base city for all comparisons, and currency movements are measured against the US dollar. The survey includes over 500 cities throughout the world; this year’s ranking includes 209 cities across five continents and measures the comparative cost of more than 200 items in each location, including housing, transportation, food, clothing, household goods, and entertainment.
Mercer produces individual cost of living and rental accommodation cost reports for each city surveyed. For more information on city rankings, visit https://mobilityexchange.mercer.com/Insights/cost-of-living-rankings.

Notes for Editors

The figures for Mercer’s cost of living and rental accommodation cost comparisons are derived from a survey conducted in March 2019. Exchange rates from that time and Mercer’s international basket of goods and services from its Cost of Living Survey have been used as base measurements.

Governments and major companies use data from this survey to protect the purchasing power of their employees when transferred abroad; rental accommodation costs data is used to assess local expatriate housing allowances. The choice of cities surveyed is based on demand for data.

Mercer Cost of Living Survey – Worldwide Rankings 2019

Mercer Cost of Living Survey – Worldwide Rankings 2019

(Mercer international basket, including rental accommodation costs)

Rank as of March

City

Country/ Region

2018

2019

1

1

HONG KONG

Hong Kong (SAR)

2

2

TOKYO

Japan

4

3

SINGAPORE

Singapore

5

4

SEOUL

South Korea

3

5

ZURICH

Switzerland

7

6

SHANGHAI

China

43

7

ASHGABAT

Turkmenistan

9

8

BEIJING

China

13

9

NEW YORK CITY

United States

12

10

SHENZHEN

China

8

11

NDJAMENA

Chad

10

12

BERN

Switzerland

11

13

GENEVA

Switzerland

21

14

VICTORIA

Seychelles

16

15

TEL AVIV

Israel

28

16

SAN FRANCISCO

United States

15

17

GUANGZHOU

China

35

18

LOS ANGELES

United States

23

19

OSAKA

Japan

14

20

COPENHAGEN

Denmark

26

21

DUBAI

United Arab Emirates

37

22

KINSHASA

Dem. Rep. of the Congo

19

23

LONDON

United Kingdom

18

24

LIBREVILLE

Gabon

42

25

LAGOS

Nigeria

6

26

LUANDA

Angola

17

27

MOSCOW

Russia

25

27

NANJING

China

22

29

NOUMEA

New Caledonia

24

30

ABIDJAN

Côte d’Ivoire

31

30

CHENGDU

China

29

32

TIANJIN

China

40

33

ABU DHABI

United Arab Emirates

41

33

NAGOYA

Japan

27

35

TAIPEI

Taiwan

45

35

RIYADH

Saudi Arabia

51

37

CHICAGO

United States

54

38

HONOLULU

United States

19

39

BRAZZAVILLE

Congo

52

40

BANGKOK

Thailand

36

41

QINGDAO

China

56

42

WASHINGTON

United States

32

43

DUBLIN

Ireland

60

44

MIAMI

United States

33

45

MILAN

Italy

38

45

SHENYANG

China

34

47

PARIS

France

66

47

DHAKA

Bangladesh

70

49

BOSTON

United States

29

50

SYDNEY

Australia

39

51

VIENNA

Austria

43

52

YAOUNDE

Cameroon

65

53

BEIRUT

Lebanon

48

54

BANGUI

Central African Republic

46

55

ROME

Italy

79

56

WHITE PLAINS

United States

77

57

MANAMA

Bahrain

50

58

AMSTERDAM

Netherlands

73

59

DJIBOUTI

Djibouti

86

59

HOUSTON

United States

47

61

OSLO

Norway

85

62

DALLAS

United States

63

63

ACCRA

Ghana

90

64

SEATTLE

United States

53

65

HELSINKI

Finland

73

66

DOUALA

Cameroon

55

67

MUMBAI

India

57

67

MUNICH

Germany

95

69

ATLANTA

United States

75

70

MONTEVIDEO

Uruguay

97

70

MORRISTOWN

United States

62

72

DAKAR

Senegal

95

72

SAN JUAN

Puerto Rico

68

74

FRANKFURT

Germany

49

75

ST. PETERSBURG

Russia

94

75

AMMAN

Jordan

67

77

BRUSSELS

Belgium

102

78

MINNEAPOLIS

United States

58

79

MELBOURNE

Australia

69

79

SANTIAGO

Chile

71

81

BERLIN

Germany

64

82

MADRID

Spain

97

83

PORT OF SPAIN

Trinidad & Tobago

71

84

LUXEMBOURG

Luxembourg

99

85

ABUJA

Nigeria

58

86

SAO PAULO

Brazil

61

87

PERTH

Australia

106

88

CONAKRY

Guinea

81

89

AUCKLAND

New Zealand

116

90

DETROIT

United States

79

91

BARCELONA

Spain

82

92

DUSSELDORF

Germany

114

93

PANAMA CITY

Panama

122

94

ST. LOUIS

United States

93

95

LISBON

Portugal

77

96

CANBERRA

Australia

83

97

PRAGUE

Czech Republic

123

97

NAIROBI

Kenya

125

97

PITTSBURGH

United States

88

100

HAMBURG

Germany

117

100

JEDDAH

Saudi Arabia

106

102

BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN

Brunei

84

103

BRISBANE

Australia

117

103

MUSCAT

Oman

117

105

JAKARTA

Indonesia

125

106

CLEVELAND

United States

130

107

PORTLAND

United States

142

108

PHNOM PENH

Cambodia

87

109

ADELAIDE

Australia

138

109

MANILA

Philippines

92

111

RIGA

Latvia

109

112

VANCOUVER

Canada

137

112

HANOI

Vietnam

101

114

WELLINGTON

New Zealand

109

115

TORONTO

Canada

115

115

DOHA

Qatar

91

117

YANGON

Myanmar

103

118

NEW DELHI

India

121

119

KUWAIT CITY

Kuwait

124

120

HO CHI MINH CITY

Vietnam

99

121

RIO DE JANEIRO

Brazil

132

121

LIMA

Peru

105

123

LYON

France

120

124

BAMAKO

Mali

104

125

POINTE A PITRE

Guadeloupe

108

126

STUTTGART

Germany

89

127

STOCKHOLM

Sweden

111

128

COTONOU

Benin

112

128

ATHENS

Greece

128

128

CASABLANCA

Morocco

113

131

BRATISLAVA

Slovakia

141

131

SAN JOSE

Costa Rica

76

133

BUENOS AIRES

Argentina

165

133

HAVANA

Cuba

128

135

BIRMINGHAM

United Kingdom

130

136

GUATEMALA CITY

Guatemala

134

137

ABERDEEN

United Kingdom

161

138

WINSTON SALEM

United States

147

139

MONTREAL

Canada

140

140

TALLINN

Estonia

145

141

KUALA LUMPUR

Malaysia

132

142

LJUBLJANA

Slovenia

138

143

ZAGREB

Croatia

157

144

MEXICO CITY

Mexico

134

145

LOME

Togo

134

145

OUAGADOUGOU

Burkina Faso

148

145

GLASGOW

United Kingdom

156

148

QUITO

Ecuador

143

149

NIAMEY

Niger

173

150

KIEV

Ukraine

145

151

NUREMBERG

Germany

148

152

VILNIUS

Lithuania

154

153

CALGARY

Canada

144

154

CHENNAI

India

163

154

ISTANBUL

Turkey

150

156

LEIPZIG

Germany

164

157

KINGSTON

Jamaica

152

158

BELFAST

United Kingdom

179

159

MAPUTO

Mozambique

165

160

RABAT

Morocco

153

161

LIMASSOL

Cyprus

160

161

OTTAWA

Canada

161

161

PORT LOUIS

Mauritius

151

164

BUDAPEST

Hungary

125

165

PORT AU PRINCE

Haiti

172

166

TIRANA

Albania

174

166

SAN SALVADOR

El Salvador

188

166

CAIRO

Egypt

178

169

SANTO DOMINGO

Dominican Republic

168

170

BOGOTA

Colombia

180

171

DAR ES SALAAM

Tanzania

183

171

ADDIS ABABA

Ethiopia

154

173

WARSAW

Poland

158

174

BRASILIA

Brazil

169

175

KIGALI

Rwanda

176

176

BUCHAREST

Romania

175

177

SOFIA

Bulgaria

186

178

BAKU

Azerbaijan

170

179

BENGALURU

India

170

180

CAPE TOWN

South Africa

181

181

BELGRADE

Serbia

158

182

COLOMBO

Sri Lanka

192

183

KAMPALA

Uganda

195

184

ALGIERS

Algeria

177

185

JOHANNESBURG

South Africa

183

186

ASUNCION

Paraguay

193

187

MONTERREY

Mexico

165

188

HARARE

Zimbabwe

182

189

KOLKATA

India

189

189

GABORONE

Botswana

187

191

ALMATY

Kazakhstan

194

192

NOUAKCHOTT

Mauritania

204

193

BLANTYRE

Malawi

191

194

SARAJEVO

Bosnia and Herzegovina

199

195

LA PAZ

Bolivia

185

196

LUSAKA

Zambia

198

197

YEREVAN

Armenia

202

198

MINSK

Belarus

201

199

TEGUCIGALPA

Honduras

200

200

MANAGUA

Nicaragua

197

201

SKOPJE

Macedonia

203

202

TBILISI

Georgia

190

203

ISLAMABAD

Pakistan

196

204

WINDHOEK

Namibia

206

204

BANJUL

Gambia

207

206

BISHKEK

Kyrgyzstan

205

207

KARACHI

Pakistan

209

208

TASHKENT

Uzbekistan

208

209

TUNIS

Tunisia

 

Source: Mercer’s 2019 Cost of Living Survey

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Mercer.

About Mercer

Mercer delivers advice and technology-driven solutions that help organizations meet the health, wealth and career needs of a changing workforce. Mercer’s more than 23,000 employees are based in 44 countries and the firm operates in over 130 countries. Mercer is a wholly owned subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan Companies(NYSE: MMC), the leading global professional services firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. With 75,000 colleagues and annualized revenue approaching $17 billion, Marsh & McLennan helps clients navigate an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. Marsh & McLennan Companies is also the parent company of Marsh, which advises individual and commercial clients of all sizes on insurance broking and innovative risk management solutions; Guy Carpenter, which develops advanced risk, reinsurance and capital strategies that help clients grow profitably and pursue emerging opportunities; and Oliver Wyman, which serves as a critical strategic, economic and brand advisor to private sector and governmental clients.For more information, visit www.mercer-africa.com. Follow Mercer on LinkedIn Mercer Africa.

Mercer also provides advice and market data on international and expatriate compensation management, and works with multinational companies and governments worldwide. It maintains one of the most comprehensive databases on international assignment policies; compensation practices; and data on worldwide cost of living, housing, and hardship allowances. Its annual global mobility conferences and other events provide companies with the latest trends and research on mobility issues. Visit https://mobilityexchange.mercer.com/ for details. Follow Mercer’s mobility news on Twitter @Mercer.

 

Media Contact

Zwile Nkosi 

zwile.nkosi@mercer.com 

+27 66 483 8974

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Commonwealth Secretary-General, Patricia Scotland, to Deliver Keynote Address At The 3rd Africa Summit, London
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments

PORTSMOUTH, United Kingdom, June 26, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/-Commonwealth Secretary-General, Hon. Patricia Scotland OBE, will deliver the keynote address at the 3rd Africa Summit which is set to take place in the prestigious Dorchester Hotel, London. Mrs Scotland is expected to speak on trade relations between Commonwealth nations and the organization’s activities in facilitating bilateral trade among member and non-member nations alike.

The British politician and barrister who served in ministerial positions within the UK government, most notably as the Attorney General for England & Wales and Advocate General for Northern Ireland, was elected the 6th Secretary-General of the Commonwealth of Nations at the 2015 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting and took office on 1 April 2016. She is the first woman to hold the position and is a dual citizen of the United Kingdom and Dominica.

Commonwhealth SG

This edition of the Africa Summit has the theme, Intra-Africa Trade: Beyond Rhetoric and Political Commitments. The summit will among other things, tackle key issues associated with the continent’s growth and development; host series of high-level panel discussions and keynote presentations. The event will also feature discussions and sustainable engagement to exchange experiences, evidence-based researches and practical approaches to boost and address emerging issues and challenges that will confront the full implementation of the Continental Free Trade agreement.

Already confirmed participants include HE Patricia Scotland OBE, Secretary General of the Commonwealth; Hon. Dr. Edward Hinga Sandy, Minister of Trade & Industry, Sierra Leone; Hon. Hamat K. Bah, Minister of Culture & Tourism Gambia; Hon. Souleymane Diarrassouba, Minister of Commerce, Industry, & SME Promotion, Cote d’Ívoire; Lord Dollar Popat, UK House of Lords; Jeremy Lefroy MP, UK House of Commons; Dr. Samuel Jibao, Commissioner-General of National Revenue Authority, Sierra Leone, Mr. François Guibert, Chief Executive Officer, Economic Development Board, Mauritius and a delegation of other distinguished business and political leaders from South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Mauritius, Cote d’Ivoire, Sierra Leone, Ghana, and across Africa and the UK.

Past participants of African Leadership events include Managing Director, First Bank of Nigeria, Akinsola Adeduntan, Honourable Minister of Culture & Tourism, Gambia, Hon. Hamat N.K Bah, Honourable Minister of Transport, Cote d’Iviore, Hon. Amadou Kone, President, CTA Mozambique, Agostinho Vuma, Group Chief Executive, Africa Reinsurance, Corneille Karakazi and many others.

The Africa Summit is a premier and annual event of the African Leadership magazine that brings together Business and Political Leaders as well as key stakeholders under one roof to connect with one another, celebrate innovation, entrepreneurship and development in the continent, and explore diverse thoughts and perspectives on issues relations to the social, economic and environmental sustainability of Africa. Previous editions of the summit have attracted over 250 leaders from across Africa, United States and the United Kingdom.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of African Leadership Magazine.

Venue
The Dorchester Hotel
53 Park Lane
London W1K 1QA, United Kingdom

For media enquiries, participation and sponsorship, contact:
Ehis Ayere
Group Head, Events and Sponsorship
T: +234 8061197781
E: ehis@www.africanleadershipmagazine.co.uk
W: www.africanleadership.co.uk

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Statement of the Chairperson regarding the situation in Ethiopia
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia, June 26, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- The Chairperson of the African Union Commission Moussa Faki Mahamat wishes to express his deepest condolences to the families of the national figures killed in the tragic events that occurred on Saturday 22 June 2019 in the Amhara region and in the capital Addis Abeba.

The Chairperson also wishes to reiterate the steadfast support of the African Union Commission to Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed and the government of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia in their pursuit of the national reform and reconciliation agenda in the country.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of the African Union Commission.

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Madagascar: Take decisive steps to end torture and killings by security forces
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments

GENEVA, Switzerland, June 26, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/-Malagasy authorities must take decisive steps to end the entrenched culture of impunity for killings, torture and other ill-treatment perpetrated by the country’s security forces, Amnesty International said today to mark the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture.

Acts of torture and other ill-treatment perpetrated by the police and the military forces are a common occurrence, with many of these violations happening in the context of the fight against alleged cattle rustlers.

“In the past few years, we have seen a spike in cases of torture against cattle rustlers, and sometimes gruesome killings. However these acts have gone unpunished, fuelling impunity,” said Deprose Muchena, Amnesty International’s Regional Director for Southern Africa.

“Malagasy authorities must promptly tackle the impunity for torture and other cases of ill-treatment. This begins with carrying out effective investigations into all known or reported cases and immediately removing suspected perpetrators from any official functions pending the outcome of the investigations. Suspected perpetrators must be brought to justice in fair trials.”

“Victims and their families must have access to effective remedies and justice.”

During searches for suspected cattle rustlers, Malagasy security forces have often raided and looted villages, burned down houses, and tortured or killed villagers. In January 2019, Amnesty International verified harrowing images of eight men in Betroka, Southern Madagascar, whose bodies were bullet-riddled after they were shot by police during a raid. They were accused of trying to steal from a shop.

Other recent cases include three men accused of stealing firearms, who were found dead, with their bodies tied up in the Onive river in Ampitatafika town on 31 May. They had been arrested by the military on 20 May and scars on their bodies indicated they had been subjected to beatings before they died.

In April, a 19-year old student was found dead after spending a night in police custody in Maroantsetra. He had been arrested the previous day on suspicion of robbery. According to a doctor’s report, the student was beaten to death.

“Malagasy authorities must immediately put measures in place to ensure that anyone suspected of any crime is protected from all forms of torture and other ill-treatment during their arrest and when they are in custody,” said Deprose Muchena.

“This includes ensuring that they have full access to legal representation. Any information extracted through torture should not be admitted as evidence against suspects.”

Background

In February 2017, police officers burnt down five villages in Antsakabary, norther Madagascar, and committed acts of torture and other ill-treatment on villagers after two police officers who had come to arrest people accused of stealing a duck were killed by a mob.

An elderly woman died from burns during the attack after she was unable to escape. More than two years later, no one has been held to account for the violations.

In a 2018 report, Amnesty International found that detention conditions in Malagasy prisons also constitute torture, with severe overcrowding and a failure to separate pre-trial detainees from convicted criminals. There is also a lack of food and healthcare.

While the organization welcomes the government’s new dietary plan for detainees, it is calling on the authorities to tackle overcrowding in prisons by reducing the use of pre-trial detention and ensuring that prison conditions are in line with international standards.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Amnesty International.

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Sierra Leone: Amnesty International joins legal challenge against government ban on pregnant girls attending school
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments

GENEVA, Switzerland, June 26, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- Amnesty International has joined a legal case brought by two non-governmental organizations, Equality Now and WAVES, to challenge the Sierra Leonean government’s ban on pregnant girls attending mainstream schools and sitting exams, the organization said today.

The announcement was made ahead of a hearing at the regional Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Community Court of Justice on 27 June 2019, where the case was initially filed in May 2018.

“We at Amnesty International believe this ban clearly conflicts with the right to education without discrimination, according to international and regional standards,” said Lucy Claridge, Director of Strategic Litigation at Amnesty International.

“Courts from South Africa, Zimbabwe to Colombia have already found that such bans violate the rights of women and girls to be treated equally and to receive education. This case represents the first time that a regional court in Africa has considered the issue. It therefore has the potential to impact the situation of pregnant girls outside of Sierra Leone and even beyond the ECOWAS community.”

Amnesty International has documented how the ban, which was imposed after the Ebola crisis in 2015 by Sierra Leone’s then Minister of Education, put the rights of thousands of girls under threat.

Background

On 17 May 2018, a Sierra Leonean NGO (WAVES) in partnership with Equality Now and the Institute for Human Rights and Development in Africa, filed a case before the ECOWAS Court challenging Sierra Leone’s ban on pregnant girls attending school and taking exams. This will be the second hearing in the case.

The Court has granted permission for Amnesty International to intervene as amicus curiae (“friend of the court”), to provide the Court with further information on how other international, regional and national bodies have treated policies that, like those in Sierra Leone, restrict the rights of pregnant girls to education, non-discrimination, bodily integrity and freedom from cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment.

Amnesty International has submitted third party and amicus curiae interventions before in a diverse range of domestic and international courts and bodies, including the ECOWAS Court, the European Court of Human Rights and Inter-American Court of Human Rights, providing expertise on matters of international human rights law, international criminal law and international humanitarian law.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of Amnesty International.

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Pushing for harm reduction success in Burundi
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments

GENEVA, Switzerland, June 26, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- Getting life-saving harm reduction services to people who use drugs in Burundi was the aim of a recent learning trip to Kenya supported by the World Health Organization (WHO). This saw a team of Burundian physicians and health advocates travel to Mombasa County, Kenya, to learn about good practice from one of the pioneers of harm reduction on the African continent.

Led by Burundian non-profit, Jeunesse au Clair Medical (JCM), the team will push for a comprehensive package of harm reduction interventions in Burundi. Like many other countries in Africa, injecting drug use is not often acknowledged, and a public health response therefore not implemented.

Drug use is widely criminalised and stigmatised and its complexities misunderstood. WHO defines harm reduction as an evidence-based public health response that includes the provision of needle and syringe programmes (NSP), opioid substitution therapy (OST) and access to testing and treatment of HIV, tuberculosis (TB) and viral hepatitis B and C.

Keen to gain insight into the Kenyan experience and inform the development of a programme in Burundi, the Burundian team of doctors, a counsellor and a national coordinator of a network of people who used drugs, visited the Reach Out Center Trust in Mombasa. They observed the delivery of OST programmes and learnt about advocacy with local influencers – in an excellent example of south-to-south learning.

Kenya’s response to minimising the adverse effects of drug use, although not without its own challenges, has succeeded largely through grassroots advocacy and on-boarding key influencers – making it easier for harm reduction to be accepted. This multi-level approach includes collaboration between government and civil society, involving both law enforcement and networks of people who use drugs.

At a visit to the Mombasa Inspectorate in charge of drug-related offences, the team learnt first-hand from the Chief Inspector the importance of police engagement, highlighting the negative impact drug use can have on young lives and the need for strategies that work. Today, some 100 police officers in Mombasa are trained on harm reduction with their work focusing on supporting, not punishing.

In addition to police buy-in, identifying other key influencers such as spiritual and village leaders, other government officials, and people who use drugs themselves, can ensure that harm reduction programmes are effective and sustainable.

Advocacy wasn’t the only thing on the agenda, the team from Burundi also saw in practice how the Kenyan clinics functioned, how methadone is dispensed, they spoke with peer educators and outreach officers, and were trained on data collection for programme monitoring. An important learning if they want to show evidence to get government and donors on their side.

While Kenya is several years ahead in its harm reduction journey, with local input, their learnings can be adapted to other contexts.

“The burden caused by drugs requires interventions at grassroots and education must be provided by trained people to avoid misinformation,” said Dr Egide Haragirimana, clinical officer at JCM.

JCM are putting into action their learnings and will next be involving networks of people who use drugs to better understand what their needs are, to inform future harm reduction initiatives.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of UNAIDS.

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BRAND AFRICA 100: AFRICA’S BEST BRANDS 2018/19 – KENYA’S BEST BRANDS
June 26, 2019 | 0 Comments

* SAFARICOM IS THE MOST ADMIRED MADE IN KENYA BRAND
* SAFARICOM IS THE MOST ADMIRED NSE LISTED BRAND
* KCB IS THE MOST ADMIRED FINANCIAL SERVICES BRAND IN KENYA
* CITIZEN IS THE MOST ADMIRED MEDIA BRAND IN KENYA
* COCA COLA IS THE OVERALL MOST ADMIRED BRAND IN KENYA
* NIKE IS THE MOST ADMIRED BRAND IN EAST AFRICA AND RETAINS ITS POSITION AS OVERALL MOST ADMIRED BRAND IN AFRICA
* NON AFRICAN BRANDS DOMINATE AFRICA AT 86% OF TOP 100 BRANDS IN AFRICA

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NAIROBI, Kenya, June 26, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- Today, the NSE in partnership with Geopoll, Kantar, Brand Leadership and africapractice, hosted Brand Africa’s announcement of the Most Admired Brands in Kenya. The list, the 7th annual Brand Africa 100: Africa’s Best Brands, is based on the comprehensive pan-Africa survey of the most admired brands among African consumers. In the Kenya and regional results, which are dominated by non-African brands, Coca Cola was recognized as the overall Most Admired Brand in Kenya. Safaricom leads as the Most Admired Brand Made in Kenya and the Most Admired Made in Kenya Brand Listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchage.

In recognizing the catalytic impact of media and financial services in Africa, Brand Africa has a separate prompted question in the survey to highlight the Most Admired Financial Services Brands and Most Admired Media Brands in Africa.
In the media sub-survey, where the pan-African list is dominated by Europe (40%), North America (20%) and Asia (20%) by global media brands with extensive pan-African reach, UK’s BBC, South Africa’s DSTV, USA’s CNN, Qatar’s Al Jazeera and France’s RFI lead the list of most admired media in Africa. In Kenya, Citizen Television was recognized as the Most Admired Media Brand Made in Kenya.
Where the pan-African media category albeit dominated by global brands, remains fragmented with numerous local and regional brands in all markets, the financial services category is relatively consolidated and African – with 64% of the Top 25 financial services brands, led by Togo’s Ecobank (#1), South Africa’s FNB (#2) and ABSA (#3) among the Top 10, are all made in Africa and pan-African. Kenya’s KCB was recognized as the most admired financial services brand in Kenya. Safaricom’s Mpesa (#13), retained its pole position among mobile money brands with Orange Money (#18), MTN Mobile Money (#19) and Tigo (#23), underscores the impact of not only Mpesa as the catalyst, but mobile as a key enabler for financial access.

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In a comparison of the most admired brands in Kenya versus East Africa region, while Nike is leading brand in East Africa, Coke is the leading brand in Kenya. Fifty percent of the brands, all non-African – Coca Cola, Samsung, Airtel, Apple and Nike – are common between Kenya and the region.

In a category analysis, Kenya Airways (Aviation/Transport), Citizen (Media), Safaricom (Telecoms), Tusker (Alcoholic Beverages), KCB (Financial Services) are the leading Made in Kenya brands in a list that’s 50% African (Kenya) and 50% non-African.
Established in 2011, the Brand Africa rankings, developed by pan-African branding and reputation advisory firm, Brand Leadership Group supported by GeoPoll the world’s leading mobile surveying platform, and strategic analysis and insights by Kantar, the world’s leading data, insights and consulting company. The rankings are based on a comprehensive survey among a representative sample of respondents 18 years and older, conducted in 25 countries which collectively account for 80% of Africa’s population and 75% of the continent’s GDP.
In the main overall Brand Africa 100: Africa’s Best Brands list announced in May at the JSE in South Africa, while the top 100 is relatively stable, African brands faltered to an all-time low of 14% share of the Top 100 most admired brands in Africa. Oover the past three years Africa’s share of the most admired brands has declined from a high of 25% in 2013/14 to lows of 16% in 2015/16, 16% in 2016/17 and 17% in 2017/18 respectively. In the Top 100, the US sports and fitness mega brand, Nike retained the overall #1 brand in Africa spontaneously recalled by consumers. The most admired African brands spontaneously recalled by Africans were South Africa’s leading pan-African telecoms brand, MTN, followed by Ethiopia’s Anbessa and Nigeria’s, Dangote. Where consumers were prompted to recall an African brand, Nigeria’s Dangote, was the most admired African brand, with South Africa’s MTN and Ethiopia’s Anbessa rounding out the Top 3.

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In a geographical spread that covers brands from 25 countries in Africa, North America, Europe and Asian brands lead the list with 41%, 28%, and 17% respectively rounding up the continental spread of brands Africans admire.

“One of the biggest challenges facing Africa is transforming its vibrant entrepreneurial energy and environment to create competitive brands that meet the needs of its growing consumer market, says Thebe Ikalafeng, Founder and Chairman of Brand Africa and Brand Leadership. “More importantly, as is evident with Safaricom, Mpesa and Tusker, the leading made in Kenya brands, the next biggest challenge is retaining the ownership of these brands and ultimately the profits in Africa. These rankings are an important metric of and challenge for creating home-grown competitive African brands that will transform the African promise and change its narrative and image as a competitive continent.”
GeoPoll used their sophisticated mobile survey platform and its proprietary access to a database of over 250 million respondents in emerging markets around the globe to identify the most admired brands in Africa among a representative sample of African consumers.
“The scope of the Brand Africa study across such a diverse sample and geographic spread would be impossible to achieve using traditional research methodologies,” says Nicholas Becker, GeoPoll CEO. “Using GeoPoll’s mobile-based research platform and large panel of respondents, we were able to quickly gather more than 15,000 brand mentions from 25 countries in Africa, providing brands with valuable data that will inform their growth. GeoPoll was pleased to partner with Brand Africa once again to gather this vital research across Africa.”

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Kantar analyzed the resultant 15 500+ brand mentions and 2 200+ individual brands and created a weighted scoring to produce the Top 100 brands.

“The key to success for building sustainable brands, irrespective of origins or domicile, is to establish an emotional connection, creating intimacy and being more present in consumers everyday lives. This survey, a complex analysis of diverse data and countries to arrive at a representative ranking, is an important metric of the brands that play that are doing a better job and playing a vital role in Africa,” says Karin Du Chenne, Kantar, Chief Growth Officer Africa Middle East.
“The Nairobi Securities Exchange applauds the businesses and specifically the Made in Kenya brands that were recognized as among Africa’s Best Brands in the 2019 Brand Africa 100 list which reflects Kenya’s position as East and Central Africa’s leading economy and hub for creating great brands,” Geoffrey Odundo, CEO – Nairobi Securities Exchange. “Our aim as the NSE is to continue to provide a world class platform that enables growth through innovative products to meet the needs of our clients and contribute to the wealth of the African continent.”
The Brand Africa 100 results are published in the June edition of the African Business Magazine now on sale globally and also available online to subscribers at www.africanbusinessmag.com and www.brandafrica. The results are distributed across Africa by African Media Agency (AMA) and media relations is handled by BWC I Burson Cohn & Wolfe is Brand Africa 100 globally.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA)on behalf of Brand Africa 100.

 

graph 1

 

graph 2

MEDIA ENQUIRIES

John Gachiri
Senior Media Executive
bcw I burson cohn & wolfe
o: +254 202 178 798
m: +254 720 539 129
john@engagebm.co.ke

Charmaine Lodewyk
GM: PR and Events
Brand Leadership
(o) +27 11 463 5091
(m) +27 71 490 6559
charmaine@brandleadership.com
———————————————————————————————
BRAND AFRICA CONTACTS
———————————————————————————————
Brand Africa
www.brandafrica.org
Thebe Ikalafeng
Chairman, Brand Africa and Brand Leadership Group
+27 82 447 9130
Thebe@Brand.Africa

GeoPoll
www.geopoll.com
Roxana Elliott
Director of Marketing, GeoPoll
roxana@geopoll.com

Patricia Githua
VP Commercial Sales, Africa
+254 724 847198
patricia@geopoll.com

Kantar
www.kantar.com
Karin Du Chenne
Chief Growth Officer Africa Middle East
m +27 83 6314870
(o). +27 11 202 7000
e Karin.duchenne@kantar.com

African Business
www.icpublications.com
Omar Ben Yedder
Group Publisher and Managing Director
+44 774 704 6670
o.benyedder@icpublications.com

———————————————————————————————
BRAND AFRICA

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Brand Africa is an intergenerational movement to inspire a great Africa through promoting a positive image of Africa, celebrating its diversity and driving its competitiveness. It is a brand-led movement which recognizes that in the 21st century, brands are an asset and a vector of image, reputation and competitiveness of nations. Brand Africa seeks to inspire a brand-led African renaissance.

Brand Africa 100: Africa’s Best Brands is a Brand Africa initiative to survey, rank and recognize the best brands in Africa.

Brand Africa is an independent Non-Profit Organisation registered in the Republic of South Africa (NPC 2013/146300/08) and a signatory to the Independent Code of Governance for Non-Profit Organisations in Africa (www.governance.org.za).
www.brand.africa

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BA 100 PARTNERS

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Brand Leadership

Brand Leadership is a pan-African branding and integrated marketing communications partner for decision-makers and brand builders interested in and/or invested in Africa. Established in 2002, Brand Leadership has over the years delivered brand-led solutions that respond to African conditions, needs and ambitions for brands in diverse industries and markets in the private and public sector brands in Africa across www.brandleadership.com

GeoPoll

GeoPoll is a leader in providing fast, high quality market research from areas that are difficult to access using traditional methods. Working with clients including global brands, media houses, and international development groups, GeoPoll facilitates projects that measure ROI of TV advertisements, demonstrate demand for new products, and assess food security around the world. GeoPoll combines a robust mobile surveying platform that has the ability to conduct research via multiple modes with a database of over 250 million respondents in emerging markets around the globe. Strengths lie in GeoPoll’s ability to target extremely specific populations, deploy surveys in multiple countries, and provide expert guidance on how to collect accurate, reliable data through the mobile phone. www.geopoll.com

Kantar
Kantar is the world’s leading data, insights and consulting company. We understand more about how people think, feel, shop, share, vote and view than anyone else. Combining our expertise in human understanding with advanced technologies, Kantar’s 30,000 people help the world’s leading organisations succeed and grow. www.kantar.com

BCW
BCW (Burson Cohn & Wolfe), one of the world’s largest full-service global communications agencies, is in the business of moving people on behalf of clients. Founded by the merger of Burson-Marsteller and Cohn & Wolfe, BCW delivers digitally and data-driven creative content and integrated communications programs grounded in earned media and scaled across all channels for clients in the B2B, consumer, corporate, crisis management, CSR, healthcare, public affairs and technology sectors.

BCW Africa is the pre-eminent African public relations network. Through our network of partners in 52 African countries – 36 of them branded BCW – we offer an unequalled footprint and tailored for Africa approach tested over 25+ years, that combines local agency insight and connectivity with seamless project delivery driven out of our Africa hub office in Johannesburg, South Africa.

BCW is a part of WPP (NYSE: WPP), a creative transformation company. For more information, visit www.bcw-global.com.

African Business
African Business is the best-selling pan-African business magazine with an award-winning team widely respected for its editorial excellence. It provides the all-important tools enabling decision makers to maintain a critical edge in a continent that is changing the world. African Business special reports profile a wide range of sectors and industries including transport, energy, mining, construction, aviation and agriculture. www.africanbusinessmagazine.com

africapractice
africapractice is a strategic advisory and communications consultancy that exists at the nexus between the private and public sectors. We are dedicated to supporting positive developmental impact and have a deep understanding of the challenges and opportunities that emerge as different stakeholders engage to find solutions to some of the most crucial and complex societal, environmental, political and economic problems. We advise some of the largest investors, intergovernmental bodies, international development partners, and governments across the Africa.
africapractice leverages its position and tried and tested methodology to bring stakeholders together, align their inherent interests and mobilise actors in a concerted manner through effective communications and engagement. Ultimately, at africapractice, we enable our clients to undertake transformative change, for themselves, their stakeholders, and their communities. www.africapractice.com

NSE
The Nairobi Securities Exchange (NSE) is a leading African Exchange, based in Kenya – one of the fastest-growing economies in Sub-Saharan Africa. Founded in 1954, NSE has a six decade heritage in listing equity and debt securities. It offers a world class trading facility for local and international investors looking to gain exposure to Kenya and Africa’s economic growth. NSE demutualized and self-listed in 2014. NSE is playing a vital role in the growth of Kenya’s economy by encouraging savings and investment, as well as helping local and international companies access cost-effective capital. NSE operates under the jurisdiction of the Capital Markets Authority of Kenya. It is a full member of the World Federation of Exchange, a founder member of the African Securities Exchanges Association (ASEA) and the East African Securities Exchanges Association (EASEA). The NSE is a member of the Association of Futures Market and is a partner exchange in the United Nations-led SSE initiative. www.nse.co.ke

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‘Wanton destruction’ in Sudan’s Darfur region, ‘blatant violation’ of international law
June 25, 2019 | 0 Comments

The looting and destruction of UN food relief agency premises and property in Sudan, has prompted the UN-African Union mission in Darfur (UNAMID) and UN Country Team, to condemn the assault as a “blatant violation of international humanitarian law”.

NEW YORK, United States of America, June 25, 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- On 19 June, a group of protestors ransacked the World Food Programme’s (WFP) Graida office, in South Darfur, stealing an unspecified amount of money and vandalizing four vehicles. They also invaded and destroyed offices and properties of the humanitarian organization, World Vision International (WVI).

“This behaviour is totally unacceptable, especially the looting and destruction of humanitarian property causing serious disruption to the work of humanitarians providing lifesaving assistance to the most vulnerable people of Graida”, said Gwi-Yeop Son, UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in Sudan.

“These actions constitute a blatant violation of international humanitarian law”, he spelled out.

Attacks against civilian populations in Darfur continue and appear to be increasing in severity. Some 1.64 million internally displaced persons in Darfur remain especially vulnerable and sexual and gender-based violence continues to restrict women and girls’ freedom of movement in IDP camps and areas of return, according to Fatou Bensouda, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), who briefed the Security Council last week.

She noted that this is part of a resurgence of grave crimes by former ‘Janjaweed’ militia fighters that are now part of the Transitional Military Council-sanctioned Rapid Support Forces and who were responsible more than a decade ago for many alleged atrocities in Darfur. 

For his part, UNAMID Joint Special Representative/Joint Chief Mediator, Jeremiah Mamabolo, decried the limited support given to UN entities facing dangerous attacks that risk the lives of staff and local citizens.

“This looting incident in Graida comes just a few weeks after a similar intrusion took place in El Geneina, west Darfur”, he pointed out. “Such wanton destruction of UN property and assets cannot continue with impunity”.

Although the situation has been brought under control and evacuated UN staff have safely arrived in Nyala, South Darfur, the Organization stressed the critical need to respect humanitarians assisting the most vulnerable in Darfur and the rest of Sudan.  

“The UN further reminds the Government of Sudan, as a member of the United Nations, and its citizenry in general, that they have a standing obligation to protect UN and other international staff operating in their country, including the organisation’s assets”, Mr. Mamabolo emphasized. “It is the responsibility of the of the Government of Sudan to be accountable and to protect all UN staff operating within Sudanese borders”, he underscored

In line with the protecting of civilians, UNAMID continues to monitor and facilitate humanitarian access in Darfur, as mandated by the Security Council.

Distributed by African Media Agency (AMA) on behalf of the United Nations.

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La générosité des Africains envers les réfugiés ne doit pas être considérée comme acquise (HCR)
June 25, 2019 | 0 Comments

La communauté internationale ne doit pas prendre la générosité des Africains envers les réfugiés pour acquis, a déclaré lundi le chef de l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) lors d’une réunion informelle des membres du Conseil de sécurité organisée au siège de l’ONU à New York.

NEW YORK, Etats Unis d’Amérique, le 25 Juin 2019,-/African Media Agency (AMA)/- S’exprimant par visioconférence depuis Genève, le Haut-Commissaire des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, Filippo Grandi, a décrit l’Afrique comme un « théâtre humanitaire », en référence au récent rapport de son agence faisant etat d’une augmentation significative du nombre de personnes contraintes de fuir en Afrique.

Et en même temps, l’Afrique est un « leader humanitaire » et un exemple positif pour d’autres régions du monde, a déclaré M. Grandi, de nombreux pays du continent défendant des politiques progressistes à l’égard des réfugiés. « Contrairement à d’autres régions, y compris celles où des pays ont plus de ressources et plus de moyens pour répondre, les frontières ont tendance à rester ouvertes aux flux de réfugiés ».

Le Conseil de sécurité doit « redoubler d’efforts » pour trouver des solutions politiques

Faisant référence au rôle du Conseil de sécurité dans la résolution des problèmes liés aux réfugiés, aux migrations et aux déplacements, M. Grandi a appelé les États à redoubler d’efforts politiques pour trouver des solutions, car, a-t-il déclaré, là où ils réussissent, – comme dans le cas relativement rare de la Côte d’Ivoire – les réfugiés et les personnes déplacées rentrent chez eux.

Le chef du HCR a conclu son intervention en rendant hommage à la solidarité manifestée par les Africains envers ceux qui sont contraints de fuir leur foyer, soulignant que, contrairement à d’autres parties du monde, cette solidarité n’était pas un sujet de débat politique: « Nous sommes redevables aux millions d’Africains ordinaires vivant dans des villages et des villes qui, par sens du devoir, par leurs traditions culturelles ou par leurs propres valeurs, gardent la porte ouverte et partagent des ressources souvent rares ».

Intervenant lors de cette réunion, Bience Gawanas, la Conseillère spéciale du Secrétaire général pour l’Afrique, a déclaré que le Conseil de sécurité avait la responsabilité de trouver des solutions cohérentes au déplacement, par opposition aux approches « cloisonnées » de la paix, des affaires humanitaires et du développement qui ne sont ni efficaces ni durables.

Mme Gawanas a déclaré que le meilleur moyen de faire face aux déplacements, était de s’attaquer aux causes profondes des problèmes, afin que les personnes ne soient pas obligées de fuir. La communauté internationale, a-t-elle poursuivi, doit écouter les jeunes qui ne veulent pas simplement de la stabilité, mais de meilleures perspectives et de l’espoir pour l’avenir.

Elle a déclaré qu’il était essentiel que le Conseil et la communauté internationale dans son ensemble continuent de soutenir les pays hôtes, à la fois financièrement et en supprimant les obstacles empêchant les réfugiés de travailler ou de s’intégrer pleinement au sein des communautés d’accueil.

La réunion informelle, intitulée ‘Répondre efficacement aux besoins des réfugiés, des personnes déplacées et des rapatriés : le rôle du Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies et de ses membres’, a été organisée par les trois membres africains du Conseil – la Guinée équatoriale, la Côte d’Ivoire et l’Afrique du Sud – conjointement avec la Mission permanente de l’Union africaine auprès de l’ONU.

La reunion avait pour objectif de trouver des moyens d’améliorer la situation des réfugiés, des personnes déplacées et des rapatriés ; de discuter du rôle du Conseil de sécurité dans la mise en œuvre du Pacte mondial sur les réfugiés – qui fournit des orientations sur la manière de répondre aux besoins des réfugiés et des communautés hôtes – et de réfléchir comment le partenariat entre l’Union africaine et l’ONU peut avoir un impact positif sur les réfugiés et les personnes déplacées à l’intérieur de leur pays.

La réunion s’est déroulée dans le cadre des efforts internationaux importants déployés pour faire face à la crise mondiale des réfugiés. Selon le HCR, plus de 70 millions de personnes sont actuellement déplacées de force (le nombre le plus élevé jamais enregistré), dont 25,9 millions de réfugiés, 41,3 millions de personnes déplacées à l’intérieur de leur propre pays et 3,5 millions de demandeurs d’asile.

Distribué par African Media Agency (AMA) pour les Nations Unies.

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