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New paradigms for the protection of African people

June 30, 2014

By Jacques Sotero Agboton*

189720_100714040010526_6329127_nThere may be an awareness of an increasing scramble by foreign forces on Africa’s resources, and by and large, the response of Africans has been to seek to protect the landmass from expropriation when there are in addition some vicious exactions against the masses of people.

If those who benefit from crumbs of their masters feign to see the reality, there has been an agenda of deliberately orchestrated confusion prolonged by decades-long misinformation and coaching by foreign operatives such that even the political rhetoric is awash of generic code words such as colonialism or imperialism while no progress has been attained in the liberation of African people from oppression.

It is oppression, expressed in the multiples exactions against the masses of our people, which bring us to channel a unique perspective based on the protection foremost of the masses. Our conviction stands on the basis of our experience of slavery. Here, our notion of slavery is clearly the forms of dehumanizing slavery experienced by only Black people.

We have observed over the decades and since the beginning of the so-called post-independence processes those skewed strategies of the same oppressors who brought our rulers into alliances even denouncing colonialism and imperialism so as to shift all focus from them.  In a nutshell, Africans wasted years and a lot of energy into endless battles without a positive outcome.

It is our conviction that we could reverse the trend by shifting to new paradigms for the protection of exclusively Black people because it is atypical historically, and sinful spiritually to spare the enemy who seeks to destroy us.

In other words, our alliances with the enemies of our people have been wrong. Our dependence on our oppressors for defense and sustenance has been wrong. Our sharing of hope and misplaced appeal to the humanity of others is as wrong as the innate hypocrisy they show to exploit us.

Henceforth, we must dismantle or profoundly reconfigure the organic and structural frameworks of agencies and institutions so as to break out of the clutches of our oppressors. One such framework is the African Union in which Blacks have poured-in their emotions rather than their rational power. Others of such organic frameworks are the so-called regional or sub-regional bodies with the same systemic dysfunctions. How can a group of nations, already subservient to the same people which oppressed them, depend on the latter for funding? What autonomy does any nation much less political organization or institution seeks when it depends on external or international sources for financing its administration’s budget or purported programs?

These institutions or bodies cannot be reconfigured or dismantled or replaced until we reckon and seek to deal with the systemic financial bottlenecks which rig member-states into debtor nations or recurrent bankruptcy-prone states. Until that is done, nothing will change within the established systems because no predatory system can produce regeneration.

The independence processes were a means to an end; not an end to a means. Africans lost sight of this fact and therefore, regressed instead of taking the trajectory towards collective development and personal achievements which should have propelled each country to a superpower status.

Here again, there a need to recognize that the propaganda of the West is deceptive. Those Africans who were credulous and believed in earlier promises such as in emancipation, and later, in independence have seen the results. If Africa is the cradle of the human civilization from which Europe emerge, how is it that the clueless is promising to birth its mother?

This should bring Africans to think that the increment of productions of products without direct benefits to the people is not growth but exploitation. The increment of services to cater to so-called world consumers is no measure of growth whatever the scale, but exploitation. Exploitation is slavery.

The defense of free-trade policy in relation to those nations of predators who underdeveloped Africa so that their industries prosper will produce wanton consumerism without the creation of nationally owned self-sufficient and self-sustained production units. Impoverishing any nation is not economic emergence, but a crime against humanity.

The propaganda of an economic emergence to which Africans must be racing is a cockamamie as deep as the depravity of westerners. Africans must understand this fact once and for all because the only development that translates the aspiration of a nation is the elevation of each citizen to its conscious responsibilities as a pillar of society. Any system of exploitation impoverishing the citizens on behalf of castes of Regents or of the oppressors is slavery.

As it stands today, we have only enclaves of slaves in Black Africa; each with different levels or strata of men and women but all beholding to the same predators. Those posturing as free men and free women in ignorance of their role are as dangerous those conscious of their treasonous acts.

Those who understand this fact and who have the courage to contribute their talents and competence in the struggle to liberate our people must consolidate their efforts. Those who maintain this system of oppression must suffer the same fate as Africa’s enemies.

*Jacques Sotero Agboton is an international political analyst and can be reached through facebook.

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